Author Topic: Progression.  (Read 735 times)

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Offline tobyjenner

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #25 on: May 04, 2021, 10:36:59 am »
Always amazed me that a player can just pull out all sorts of different axes and away they go, yet each one has a different neck thickness, width, radius, etc...

Well once you have that foundation built you should be able to play anything. I don't even think about it when I swap around my collection. Its all down to practice so you don't think about it, especially the basics.
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Offline DarkPrognosis

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #26 on: May 04, 2021, 10:51:40 am »
Well once you have that foundation built you should be able to play anything. I don't even think about it when I swap around my collection. Its all down to practice so you don't think about it, especially the basics.
Simples.  8)
Well, to some extent, but those who don't think about it I lay odds have octopus tentacle length fingers.

As I was roaming around I actually saw a site say Jimi Hendrix had small hands.  I choked up with that one as the dude could wrap his fingers around two necks simultaneously, and probably have room enough to smoke with it too.

Offline Majik

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #27 on: May 04, 2021, 11:12:27 am »
As I was roaming around I actually saw a site say Jimi Hendrix had small hands.  I choked up with that one as the dude could wrap his fingers around two necks simultaneously, and probably have room enough to smoke with it too.

Yes, there's a lot of rubbish on the Internet (and a surprising number of gullible people who fall for some of the most egregious nonsense).



Cheers,

Keith


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Offline close2u

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #28 on: May 04, 2021, 12:11:50 pm »
I will always window shop. 

Please don't do that. If Justin suits your learning style then just stick with the Beginner course, step by step by step by step. Module by module by module. Lesson by lesson by lesson. It works. It has worked for thousands and thousands of JG students over the years. :)


DP, this was your first post in the forum (my emphasis). 
... I look at what is ahead of me and there is so much to know I don't look ahead any more as it makes me want to throw in the towel because it is so much to learn, and to know, I dunno.  This is why I do one thing at a time with blinders on.


For Module 2 Justin has this practice routine :
Quote
20-MINUTE PRACTICE BREAKDOWN
Here is my recommendation for a typical 20-minute practice session at this stage:

Chord Perfect – E Chord: 2 minutes
Chord Perfect – D Chord: 1 minute
Chord Perfect – A Chord: 1 minute

Anchor Finger Practice: 2 minutes

One Minute Changes - A to D: 1 minute
One Minute Changes - A to E: 1 minute
One Minute Changes - D to E: 1 minute

Peter Gunn Theme Riff Fun: 1 minute

Song work: 10 minutes

YOU'LL BE READY TO MOVE ON WHEN...
You memorized the E chord - as well as A and D chords, of course! :)
You are comfortable using an anchor finger for these chord changes
You can get around 30 chord changes in one minute between all chords learned so far
You had some fun with the Peter Gunn Theme
You had a go at playing a song (or two) using all three chords.


I was subsequently told that there are no, free training of an E/A/D song with Justin to follow along with as there was for A/D in module 1

Not true.

Go to the Songs page, use the filters on the left for Difficulty = White and Easy Chords = A, D, E and Tags = Just 3 chords and you will see all of these songs that all have video lessons.

Offline Jamolay

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #29 on: May 04, 2021, 01:25:31 pm »
DP, I want pictures of the new guitar when it comes!


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Offline Majik

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2021, 01:59:15 pm »
I know E, but that doesn't mean I am fluent with E.  Like knowing Spanish, but am I fluent in it?  Nope.

My point is, at this stage, you are still in the early stages of learning. To use your analogy (which is actually quite good), it's a little like turning up on day 1 of Spanish class with a Spanish dictionary and pulling out random words to remember. I'm sure learning the Spanish for, say , "traffic light" might become useful to you eventually but not so much whilst you are learning. And especially not if learning random words like this is distracting you from the practice you should be doing.

Just as the idea of learning a language, like Spanish, is not about knowing a bunch of random words, but about being able to converse, or read, the idea of learning guitar is to become a musician; to play music. The way to do this is to actually play songs and Justin's course is designed to get you playing songs quickly. Yes they are simple songs, but they are, nevertheless, songs and learning how to play them will build the musicianship you need to become a better player.

Go to the Songs page, use the filters on the left for Difficulty = White and Easy Chords = A, D, E and Tags = Just 3 chords and you will see all of these songs that all have video lessons.


I think what DP is looking for is full song play-throughs like the one for "Dance the Night Away", which most of the song lessons on Justin's site are not. Basically, I think he is looking for a free version of what is in the App.

I believe that exact thing isn't there but, there is enough of the video which can be played along to to be useful in most cases.

Quote
As far as knuckling down it wasn't that it was that I didn't have the video before.  Give me something that shows me what to do, and works with me in doing it, and my nature is to go in and conquer it.  If I don't have those two things I will discount it and not even try.  This is where the problem is at this stage as I am nowhere near ready for anyone to just throw a tab at me with three chords then tell me to sick it.  For me that will immediately mean failure.

Whilst using a "spoon-fed" play-along approach is useful to get going, I think it's quite important to move away from relying on this to prevent it becoming a crutch you rely on. It should be entirely possible to play these songs along either to a metronome or drumbeat at the right tempo, or to the original song/Youtube video.

Certainly, part of learning to play songs is being able to listen to the song and have an idea where you are and what is coming next. For songs like "Dance the Night Away" that should be easy as there are only two chords which change at regular intervals; there should be no reason why you can't remember what is coming next.

Now you have got up to speed on this with Justin's play-along I strongly suggest you try playing it along to the record instead. Use YouTube and slow it down again if you have to. It's possible you might struggle with this to start with, but stick with it and, within a couple of days I suspect you will be nailing it.

Once you have developed the confidence to be able to do this, then you will no longer be completely reliant on following play-throughs, and you will have developed yet another bit of musicianship.

By the way, you talk about "TAB" but, at this level and with most strum-along songs it's not really "TAB". It's probably, more accurately, a "Chord Chart". The two often get conflated and often appear together, but TAB shows individual strings, chord charts do not.

The chord-chart for "Dance the Night Away", for instance is really just:

|D   |A    |D    |A    |      Repeat

Which means "play D for one bar, then play A for one bar, then D, then A, then keep going". Frankly, for any two chord song you shouldn't need to follow along with a chord sheet like this; you should be able to look at it once and know everything about what to play in the whole song.

So my strong suggestion is: put away Justin's video and try playing along with this:





Obviously ignore the little musical interlude at the beginning with the guy in the supermarket, and you only need to play one strum per bar.

In future, chord charts will get more complicated including having different sequences of chords at different parts of the song. That will be a new challenge when you get to those and, in those cases, you may benefit from having chord sheet in front of you. I don't think you are there yet though.

Quote
Not sure I am ready for that to be honest as it is too much all at once to keep the time, strum, count, tap the foot all in sync while doing all of that but changing to an up strum when needed then back, and forth.

That's fine. Bear in mind that, although these are beginner songs and a lot of the instruction is aimed at following the beginner lesson track, they are also on YouTube as general song lessons for people who might want to learn the song who may already be past lesson one, and who may already have developed some strumming skills. It's totally optional and it's something that Justin will teach properly later.

At this point I think you need to continue to focus on one strum per bar, and learning to play songs with the E, D and A chords, including learning to be able to play them along to the record/YouTube video without being reliant on Justin providing a full play-through video every time.

Cheers,

Keith

Offline Jamolay

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #31 on: May 04, 2021, 04:37:46 pm »

At this point I think you need to continue to focus on one strum per bar, and learning to play songs with the E, D and A chords, including learning to be able to play them along to the record/YouTube video without being reliant on Justin providing a full play-through video every time.

Cheers,

Keith


I would emphasize the one strum per bar to start.

I tend to get bored and annoyed that “one strum per bar” doesn’t sound like I am playing the song at first.

But I am learning that my efforts to liven it up by trying to learn a more complex strumming pattern too soon is counter productive.

I do better if I spend some time with slow and boring. It pays off and I need to do this more.


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Offline close2u

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #32 on: May 04, 2021, 04:53:44 pm »

I would emphasize the one strum per bar to start ...

... trying to learn a more complex strumming pattern too soon is counter productive.

... It pays off and I need to do this more.

THIS
:) :) :)

Offline DarkPrognosis

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #33 on: May 05, 2021, 10:08:42 am »
I am using this thread as a point of reference to refer back to as a guide.

@Majik Hmmm, I will have trouble with a full-fledged song because there is so much happening all at once and here I am a noob/newb without the ability to filter out the noise so I don't get confused.  Sure, musicians do it all the time, but I need more foundation because jumping in on songs to play along with, even with just two chords, and the song has as much stuff as that one has going on, is akin to jumping into a volcano while trying to do a perfect backstroke.  I am sure I can do it for a few seconds then it is all she wrote.

Offline DavidP

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #34 on: May 05, 2021, 10:12:48 am »
I am using this thread as a point of reference to refer back to as a guide.

@Majik Hmmm, I will have trouble with a full-fledged song because there is so much happening all at once and here I am a noob/newb without the ability to filter out the noise so I don't get confused.  Sure, musicians do it all the time, but I need more foundation because jumping in on songs to play along with, even with just two chords, and the song has as much stuff as that one has going on is akin to jumping into a volcano while trying to do a perfect backstroke.  I am sure I can do it for a few seconds then it is all she wrote.

I have the same challenges, DP. It was only in my 4th year that I was finally able to play along with a couple of songs. And it was songs I knew well and had played quite often.

I find it much easier to follow along with Justin in a sing lesson. Perhaps that is a good next step.

So don't feel bad, be gentle with yourself and just keep taking that next small step to learn and improve.

Offline J.W.C.

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Re: Progression.
« Reply #35 on: May 05, 2021, 12:16:58 pm »
I agree; don't be too hard on yourself. It will come with practice. The more you do it, the easier it will get.

 

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