Author Topic: Syncopated Rhythms  (Read 262 times)

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Offline willsie01

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Syncopated Rhythms
« on: February 19, 2021, 02:00:30 pm »
I'm trying to remember those songs that have some syncopation (if that's the right word for it) in the rhythm. I know that over time I've done a few of the songs that Justin has done a video lesson on that have some. One I remember is Dock Of The Bay. Can't remember the others!
Want to have a list to discuss with my fellow retiree guitarists who are pretty inexperienced and can't grasp the concept. I'd like to illustrate it to them with some easy examples.

Edit: Seeing David's reply prompts me to try to clarify what I mean:
Dock Of the Bay a song I used to play a few years ago using Justin's video as a guide. There's a chord change from G to B7. The sequence from one to the next is | D X D X D U X U | X X D... as usual all the downs are on the beat and accented pretty much normal but the 4th beat isn't played and the B7 from the following bar "pushed" forward and played on the U strum. The 4 &. The accent shifts to this off beat. Syncopated...I think. Does this help?
« Last Edit: February 19, 2021, 05:11:59 pm by willsie01 »

Online DavidP

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2021, 03:01:09 pm »
Going to watch the replies with interest Willsie. Can't help you out.

I've managed to grasp shuffle or swing vs straight but could explain syncopated myself ...

Offline willsie01

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2021, 05:13:10 pm »
Going to watch the replies with interest Willsie. Can't help you out.

I've managed to grasp shuffle or swing vs straight but could explain syncopated myself ...

David, I've edited my post to, hopefully, clarify what I mean!

Offline DarrellW

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2021, 07:46:01 pm »
One of the best I can think of is by The Police - Don’t stand so close me,  and there’s these Sam and Dave - Soul man and Eddie Floyd - Knock on wood plus Stevie Wonder - Superstition. There’s loads of them, soul reggae and ska tend to be syncopated purely by the structure of the music.
3 little birds is another really good one!


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Offline guitarben

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2021, 10:34:21 am »
Edwyn Collins' A Girl Like You and The Beatles' Twist & Shout are the 2 that come to mind.

Not sure if it counts as syncopated, but there is a chord change on the & before the beat instead of on the beat.

Offline willsie01

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2021, 09:03:18 pm »
One of the best I can think of is by The Police - Don’t stand so close me,  and there’s these Sam and Dave - Soul man and Eddie Floyd - Knock on wood plus Stevie Wonder - Superstition. There’s loads of them, soul reggae and ska tend to be syncopated purely by the structure of the music.
3 little birds is another really good one!


I quickly listened to excerpts of the songs you quote but I don't hear the syncopation I'm thinking of in any of them. I'm thinking of rhythms where the stronger accent is placed somewhere other then any of the main beats. Not on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th beat. E.g., in 3 little birds I hear the strong accents on the 2nd & 3rd beats, so is not an example of what I mean.
Edit: Above I should have said "...in 3 little birds I hear the strong accents on the 2nd & 4th beats..."
« Last Edit: February 27, 2021, 09:43:14 pm by willsie01 »

Offline DarrellW

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2021, 09:29:32 pm »
I'm thinking of rhythms where the stronger accent is placed somewhere other then any of the main beats. Not on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th beat. E.g., in 3 little birds I hear the strong accents on the 2nd & 3rd beats, so is not an example of what I mean
Syncopation - https://iconcollective.edu/what-is-syncopation-in-music/
All of those songs are examples of syncopation, what you’re asking is more than syncopation I think. I’m not sure about it but I think it’s termed pushed.
This might help
https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=34939.0
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Offline willsie01

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Re: Syncopated Rhythms
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2021, 09:37:54 pm »
Edwyn Collins' A Girl Like You and The Beatles' Twist & Shout are the 2 that come to mind.

Not sure if it counts as syncopated, but there is a chord change on the & before the beat instead of on the beat.

I remembered I'd viewed Justin's video on Twist & Shout and took another look: his suggested way of playing definitely incorporates the type of syncopation I'm talking about. Strangely, when I listen to the Beatles recording the syncopation in the rhythm playing doesn't come through for me although there is a hint of it in the solo George plays.

 

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