Author Topic: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?  (Read 619 times)

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Offline MartinJP

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How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« on: November 21, 2020, 10:13:44 am »
This question has been bugging me a lot these days.

Justin, in a lesson (I can't remember which lesson though; it's been a long time since I watched it) said that exploring notes and playing them and trying to find out which combinations of notes sound good is a great way to learn chords instead of memorizing tons of chord shapes.

Since then I've been doing this and I've found out a lot of great sounding chords but I don't know what chords they are; I cannot identify them.

Can somebody please help me out with this?

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Offline tobyjenner

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2020, 10:33:26 am »
Hi Martin and welcome to the forum.

Sounds like you need to start the journey of music theory. That will help you understand scales and chord construction and importantly chord inversions.

As all chords at based on a 3 note triad, they all have a formula. So for example a major chord will always be the 1st note or root in the key/scale, the 3rd and the 5th. A minor will have a flattened 3rd. You may know this already.

If you can identify the root note and the other notes you are playing, identifying which intervals they are in the key, will help you determine the chords. The intervals are also in the same relative position to each other on the fret board for example a major chord the 3rd is always (bar B string same fret) one string down one fret back from the root. The 5th, same fret as the root but the string above. So you'd play 5th 1st(R) 3rd, so a major chord but an inverted chord as the root is not the lowest note.

That is a very basic description and there are those here who will be able to give a simpler or eloquent explanation. But I'd suggest some PMT

Cheers

Toby
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Offline close2u

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2020, 10:59:22 am »
Welcome Martin.
As Toby says you definitely need to know some theory so go jump aboard the Practical Music Theory train.
https://www.justinguitar.com/categories/practical-fast-fun-music-theory

Can you give us one example of a 'chord' you are playing?

Offline MartinJP

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2020, 11:02:47 am »
Thanks Toby. I really appreciate your help.

I would have started my music theory journey by now but I can't afford to pay for it for the time being.

However I've done the first two free lessons of music theory and so far I know the basic concepts of major and minor chords and their construction. Nowadays I just fiddle with them and try and explore different chords and have a go at playing them.

I'll definitely start music theory lessons as soon as I'm able to pay for it myself.

Thanks again :)

- Martin

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« Last Edit: November 21, 2020, 11:41:34 am by close2u »

Offline MartinJP

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2020, 11:19:16 am »
Okay so one of the chords I've discovered is some form of an A chord I believe because the root note is A on the 6th string.

So the chord is this:

6th string - 5th fret (index finger)
5th string - 7th fret (ring finger)
4th string - 7th fret (pinkie)
3rd string - 6th fret (middle finger)
2nd string - Open
1st string - Open

This is one of the chords I've discovered...

There are lots more actually and most of them have same finger placements.

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« Last Edit: November 21, 2020, 11:41:41 am by close2u »

Online DarrellW

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2020, 11:35:25 am »
It looks and sounds like an A add B or A /B chord to me but I think that you would normally not play the high e; sounds nice though! You can also move it up or down 2 frets and get nice sounds still leaving the top two strings open!
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Offline close2u

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2020, 11:41:16 am »
6th string - 5th fret (index finger)
5th string - 7th fret (ring finger)
4th string - 7th fret (pinkie)
3rd string - 6th fret (middle finger)
2nd string - Open
1st string - Open


String - Fret - Note
e ------- 0 ---- [ E ]
B ------- 0 ---- [ B ]
G ------- 6 ---- [ C# ]
D ------ -7 ---- [ A ]
A ------- 7 ---- [ E ]
E ------- 5 ---- [ A ]


This is a very common guitar move.
Playing the shape of a full barre chord but without laying your index finger down as a barre so leaving the top two strings ringing open. It works at several places on the neck so move it around and listen for what sounds good.

This is a type of A chord.
A Major triad = A, C#, E
You have all three notes plus one further note which is a B note.

Look at the A Major scale:

A,   B,   C#,  D,   E,   F#,  G#,  A,   B,   C#,  D,   E,   F#,  G#,  A   etc
1,   2,   3,   4,   5,   6,   7,   8,   9,   10,  11,  12,  13,  14, 15   etc


The B note is the 2nd of the scale. So you may think that this is an Asus2. But it is not sus (suspended) as it has the 3rd of the chord ( the note C#). Also, due to convention, as the 3rd is present and the added note is higher than the first octave of the root, it would be viewed as the 9th not the 2nd. So you would call this Aadd9.

Online DarrellW

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2020, 12:59:23 pm »
The B note is the 2nd of the scale. So you may think that this is an Asus2. But it is not sus (suspended) as it has the 3rd of the chord ( the note C#). Also, due to convention, as the 3rd is present and the added note is higher than the first octave of the root, it would be viewed as the 9th not the 2nd. So you would call this Aadd9.
Ah, I see now so  /B would have been relevant if B wasn’t part of the root note scale?
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Offline LBro

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2020, 02:57:23 pm »
Hi,
You have to have flash on to use this sight and I hope it is updated soon so it still works when flash is dropped by Chrome!

You input the notes on the fretboard and it tells you the chord name. Not sure how deep it can go. Many other useful tools here as well:
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_name.php

Keep on rockin!
LB
You can rock a bit here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNOrtongjfX4RI33JWKwn7Q/featured

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Offline tobyjenner

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2020, 03:36:52 pm »
Or you get the free app SmartChord for you phone/tablet, that does a lot more than help identify chords.

https://smartchord.de/

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.smartchord.droid


Cheers

Toby
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Arrived here Mar 2013 Since completed BC, RUST 1 & 2, IM and MTMS Now on Blues Rhythm and Blues Lead
My Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/tobyjenner/
Roadcase : https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=39537.msg339454#msg33945

Offline MartinJP

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2020, 04:49:31 pm »

String - Fret - Note
e ------- 0 ---- [ E ]
B ------- 0 ---- [ B ]
G ------- 6 ---- [ C# ]
D ------ -7 ---- [ A ]
A ------- 7 ---- [ E ]
E ------- 5 ---- [ A ]


This is a very common guitar move.
Playing the shape of a full barre chord but without laying your index finger down as a barre so leaving the top two strings ringing open. It works at several places on the neck so move it around and listen for what sounds good.

This is a type of A chord.
A Major triad = A, C#, E
You have all three notes plus one further note which is a B note.

Look at the A Major scale:

A,   B,   C#,  D,   E,   F#,  G#,  A,   B,   C#,  D,   E,   F#,  G#,  A   etc
1,   2,   3,   4,   5,   6,   7,   8,   9,   10,  11,  12,  13,  14, 15   etc


The B note is the 2nd of the scale. So you may think that this is an Asus2. But it is not sus (suspended) as it has the 3rd of the chord ( the note C#). Also, due to convention, as the 3rd is present and the added note is higher than the first octave of the root, it would be viewed as the 9th not the 2nd. So you would call this Aadd9.
Thank you so much close2u !!!!!! :D

PS: I see that breaking down the scale of the root note is going to help me identify the chords I'm playing so thanks for pointing that out to me too :)

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Offline stitch101

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2020, 07:11:09 pm »
Ah, I see now so  /B would have been relevant if B wasn’t part of the root note scale?

Darrell a / or slash chord refers to a chord with another note other than the root as the
lowest note.
In the example Martin gives if the root A was muted the E on the 5th string would
be the lowest note making the chord Aadd9/E

You are correct in saying A add B but not by writing it as A/B

Online DarrellW

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2020, 08:03:49 pm »
Darrell a / or slash chord refers to a chord with another note other than the root as the
lowest note.
In the example Martin gives if the root A was muted the E on the 5th string would
be the lowest note making the chord Aadd9/E
You are correct in saying A add B but not by writing it as A/B
Thanks Stitch, I wondered what the difference was between ‘add’ and / chords was, something I’ve not really looked at theory wise, when I’ve played those types of chord I’ve not really investigated their existence.
Still here, still learning - no longer letting Fibromyalgia get in the way, it sucks but doesn’t have to mean your life stops!

Offline stitch101

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2020, 08:30:49 pm »
Darrell
Justin has a really good lesson in the new beginner course for slash chord.
It's a really good idea to go thought the new course there is way more in it
than the original BC course. It would only take you a couple of days to do
the whole course. You already know all the chords so it would only be the fun stuff
And there is lots of fun stuff.

Offline batwoman

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2020, 08:47:26 pm »
Darrell
Justin has a really good lesson in the new beginner course for slash chord.
It's a really good idea to go thought the new course there is way more in it
than the original BC course. It would only take you a couple of days to do
the whole course. You already know all the chords so it would only be the fun stuff
And there is lots of fun stuff.

This sounds like a very good idea stitch, thanks for the prompt.   
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Offline stitch101

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2020, 08:58:08 pm »
Don't want to hijack this thread but
Maggie with your new electric guitar you will have a blast.
With the licks and blues parts of the course. Justin even touches on soloing
With the minor pent and major scale.

Offline batwoman

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2020, 09:13:44 pm »
Don't want to hijack this thread but
Maggie with your new electric guitar you will have a blast.
With the licks and blues parts of the course. Justin even touches on soloing
With the minor pent and major scale.

You are a gem stitch, thankyou for pointing me towards more musical fun. I'm going to have to give up sleep to fit it all in.
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Online DarrellW

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2020, 09:27:31 pm »
You are a gem stitch, thankyou for pointing me towards more musical fun. I'm going to have to give up sleep to fit it all in.
Been there, done that the past few weeks! It’s paid off for me, I set myself the challenge to learn 3 pieces of music, one pop, one rock and one finger style - I’ve done and posted the first two and the last one could be finished tomorrow if all goes well, then I can have a bit of a rest!
Still here, still learning - no longer letting Fibromyalgia get in the way, it sucks but doesn’t have to mean your life stops!

Online DarrellW

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2020, 09:30:00 pm »
Darrell
Justin has a really good lesson in the new beginner course for slash chord.
It's a really good idea to go thought the new course there is way more in it
than the original BC course. It would only take you a couple of days to do
the whole course. You already know all the chords so it would only be the fun stuff
And there is lots of fun stuff.
Thanks Stitch, I may do it when I’ve completed my self challenge to post 3 pieces - it could be a bit more relaxing to do!
Still here, still learning - no longer letting Fibromyalgia get in the way, it sucks but doesn’t have to mean your life stops!

Offline HamrockGuitar

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2020, 03:37:17 am »
It's an A Major bar chord with the bottom 2 strings open. The 1st string open E is the 5th of the A chord so that doesn't change the chord name but the 2nd string open B is the 9th scale degree of the A chord (the 2nd scale degree an octave higher), therefore it's an Aadd9 chord.

Offline HamrockGuitar

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Re: How do I identify the chords that I discover on my own?
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2020, 03:38:45 am »
To answer your actual question... learn chord theory and the notes on the fretboard.  Cheers!

 

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