Author Topic: Gibson Les Paul Modern  (Read 606 times)

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Offline antheba

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Gibson Les Paul Modern
« on: October 15, 2020, 06:50:59 pm »
Ok... so I need a bit of advice and (maybe encouragement? not sure).

I've been learning since February, and practicing every day and making decent progress (in my opinion...). Learning to play the guitar is something I've wanted to do for a long time and i'm absolutely loving it to be honest.

I started on an acoustic that I've had since my first aborted attempt at learning 5 years previously (various reasons - not related to commitment). A friend also lent me his Fender Strat (Player I think? It's MIM) which I've started on as my tastes are more suited to electric (Rock, Metal, Blues predominantly but ranges far and wide beyond that).

The electric guitar is a loaner, and I longggg (GAS is real) to have my own electric. Something that gets me excited just to look at it. I like the Fender, but to be honest I love the look of Les Paul, love the sound they make.

Basically, I am considering buying:
- Gibson Les Paul Modern
- Katana Boss 100

I realise they're both pretty damn expensive, particularly for a beginners first guitar. Am I mental?

My logic is:
1. I want something that excites me, screams at me to pick it up and play every time I see, that sounds great and is cool - to me that's a Gibson Les Paul. I looked at other Les Paul but I like the idea of the weight relief, and to be honest love the sparkling burgundy.
2. I want something to grow into
3. If I buy something a more budget, I'll want to replace it in a years time and it'll feel like money wasted
4. The 100 is massive for bedroom playing but from reading other threads having the effects is v useful, I'll want an FX loop eventually so need mk100 rather than mk50, and you can turn it down to play at 0.5w
5. The guitar deserves a half decent amp
6. I'm in my 30s and can afford it

Things I'm concerned about:
1. Looking like a right tool in the guitar shop - all the gear no idea style. I'm learning to play for myself. I love it but I'm a bit performance shy. Currently don't even like my girlfriend listening in hah.

2. Making a choice that I'll later regret because its so obviously wrong

Is 2 a real thing?
With 1 - would it be crazy to just order online and skip the guitar shop experience entirely?

Insert your wisdom below please!
« Last Edit: October 15, 2020, 09:15:58 pm by close2u »

Offline DUrquhart

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2020, 07:18:30 pm »
I could have typed this post myself as I too would love to get a les Paul modern as my first electric.  But like you, I'm not sure if it would be wasted on me due to my advanced beginner skill set.  I'll definitely be going into the shop to sneak a feel though first before ordering.

I'll watch this thread with interest

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Offline DarrellW

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2020, 07:59:06 pm »
I’m going to throw a curved ball! I think at your stage bearing in mind you can afford it I would look at a few other options as well, there are quite a few singlecut options out there that are as good. For example Tokai make excellent look alikes that are really superb instruments, they make a made in China version that is less expensive but still very good and a made in Japan version that is arguably better than anything Gibson make. There is also the PRS singlecut guitars, the SE is their lower cost version, again very good and the American version that again is arguably better than a Gibson. Both of the lower cost ones are better than Epiphone’s offerings but do cost a bit more. If neither of them appeals to you then just go for it, I doubt that you will regret it!
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Offline marcusmarkmus

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2020, 08:10:38 pm »
Hi and welcome!
10 years ago or so I purchased a Gibson Les Paul, being in exactly your situation and having the same thoughts.
It's still my main guitar, played it countless hours, it has travelled the world with me, had it's neck broken, been forgotten at the airport and so on. You are not mad my friend :)
Your logic points are like if I had written them myselves.

Well one thing is different, I was in my late teens and couldn't afford a full priced one, but got lucky and found one with a tiny crack with half the price off. Which brings me to my second thought:
Does it have to be a Gibson? Many brands do fantastic looking and playing Les Paul style guitars, for example ESP has some I really like, and they might be cheaper.

Regarding expensive gear and "no" skills in the store. I understand you, dude. I also feel I must be "worthy" of nice things. But that is such a completely stupid concept, escpecially when the fear is from judgement from others! Like what the hell.
If a dude comes into a store, full of joy from discovering a new hobby, it's going so well he wants to upgrade his equipment to have even more fun, and uses his own hard earned cash to do it, what kind of sad, sad person will first of all bother to listen closely to the playing and check the price and then think like "uuhmmm.....that guitar is to good for you, you are clearly a level 3 player and should only buy guitars up to 57% of the price of that guitar you got there"? Then that person has much more problems in their life than you bro  ;D

2. Could be yes or no. I don't think you will go wrong with any decent guitar, maybe like a gibson les paul, as it seems like thats the sound you like(?). You won't be able to do whammy-bar divebombs or get that twangy fender twang, but you get that phat les paul-sound. You will probably want more than one guitar eventually no matter what you get though  ::)

But I would recommend going to the store (or stores?) and see how different guitars feel. The necks can be different, like Gibson les pauls can have different neck thickness, some fast soloing etc might benefit from a thinner neck, and other brands might have even thinner, some wider, and so on. And there might be a little tiny extra added price just for that "Gibson" on the headstock.

No matter what you buy now now though, odds are that not far away in the future you will be searching for pre-amp vaccuum tube reviews in the obscure parts of the internet at 2am trying to get that last damn piece of that godamn tone in your head down
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Offline stitch101

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2020, 08:13:08 pm »
You you can afford it get what you want. There is no such thing as a guitar being
to good for you. A guitar doesn't care how good you are and if it inspires you to
play then that's a good thing.
You'll get a lot of "You can do better for less" comments, usually from people who
have never own a Gibson or they just dislike them for some reason.

If your heart is set on getting a Gibson Les Paul then go and find the one that you
love and play your heart out.

I bought my first Gibson LP in 1979 and haven't regretted it. I also have 2 Gibson acoustics
and  even the haters want to play them when I take them to a Jam session.

Make sure you play alot of different brands of guitars. You don't want to limit your
taste to just one. 

Online close2u

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2020, 08:24:09 pm »
Hi and welcome to the forum.

First, you are right to want great gear. Especially given you have stuck it out and are becoming a guitarist who wants to go further. Especially as you can afford it. And why not chase down a dream. The guitar you buy now, in your 30s, could be the guitar you live with for years ahead - a true keeper. So don't stint for the sake of maybe a couple of hundred dollars.
That said, I wholly agree with people saying both go try some guitars in person and be open to the possibility that it will be a different guitar that really grabs you and melts your heart.

Offline Majik

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2020, 08:40:13 pm »
I realise they're both pretty damn expensive, particularly for a beginners first guitar. Am I mental?

The Katana isn't that expensive.

The Les Paul Modern? Are you talking about the £2,000-2,500 Gibson Les Paul Modern, or another model like the Epiphone equivalent which is more around the £500 range?

If you are talking about the Gibson one, that is a pretty high end guitar and, yes, it is expensive.

Quote
My logic is:
1. I want something that excites me, screams at me to pick it up and play every time I see, that sounds great and is fxxxing cool - to me that's a Gibson Les Paul. I looked at other Les Paul but I like the idea of the weight relief, and to be honest love the sparkling burgundy.
2. I want something to grow into
3. If I buy something a more budget, I'll want to replace it in a years time and it'll feel like money wasted

Having something that inspires you is absolutely the right thing. But it's also good to realize that you will be paying a premium for the Gibson badge, and that there is a law of diminishing returns on guitars after they pass around the £500-700 range. Very roughly speaking, a guitar costing £2,500 is not 5 x better than a guitar costing £500. It might only be 10% better (if you could measure it objectively).

On the basis I think you are looking at a £2,500 guitar, that is not a guitar that anyone would class as a beginner model. In fact it's not even a guitar that many professionals or experienced guitar players would have. And having such a high-end guitar is unlikely to stop you wanting other guitars in the future.

So, whilst I agree that buying a "budget" guitar (i.e. under £200) might lead you to replace it in the future, I would not say this is necessarily the case with a guitar costing, say, £400-600. Such guitars are normally great guitars and not "budget" in any meaningful sense. You will not *need* to grow into anything beyond this (although GAS might drive you to).

It's also important to realize that you can always sell on a guitar. And, frankly, no guitars are guaranteed to hold their value. So whilst you might resell on a Gibson for more than you would a different brand, you also paid more for it in the first place, so it balances out. And higher end guitar is going to be more difficult to sell.

Also, a lot of people keep their old guitars when they get new ones, partly so they can collect different styles as these can feel and play differently.

Another consideration is that you might actually find that, as much as you love how they look, the Les Paul isn't for you once you've played it a bit and learned what you like. Tastes change, and they can change with experience. You might find the humbuckers too dark for the sort of music you want to play, or the neck doesn't feel right, or that it's too heavy (Les Paul's tend to be pretty heavy).

These are all factors you should consider which, I'm afraid, go against your logic if you are looking at buying a high-end guitar.

I'm not saying you shouldn't get it, but you should consider it a luxury purchase than something you need, or which will be the only guitar you ever buy (almost guaranteed it won't be). Frankly you may desire it, but you don't need it and there are potential pitfalls in buying such an expensive guitar which you should consider.

Quote
4. The 100 is massive for bedroom playing but from reading other threads having the effects is v useful, I'll want an FX loop eventually so need mk100 rather than mk50, and you can turn it down to play at 0.5w

Clarification: all models of the Katana have the effects. The Katana 100 has the option for a better footswitch which makes them easier to select and use during a performance.

The "effects loop" is really only useful on the Katana if you think you might use a looper pedal. It's pretty much impractical to use the onboard effects on the Katana 50 with a looper pedal.

IMO if you want a Katana and can afford the 100 over the 50, it's worth getting it.

Quote
6. I'm in my 30s and can afford it

That's an entirely reasonable qualification, although I would still be wary of buying a high-end guitar as a beginner. But if you can afford it easily, why not.

Just be aware that, if you continue in your guitar journey, this will almost certainly not be the only guitar you ever buy, and you may or may not keep it forever. You might want to consider that, if you will be buying another guitar in, say, 5 years, how that impacts your spending decision now.

Quote
Things I'm concerned about:
1. Looking like a right tool in the guitar shop - all the gear no idea style. I'm learning to play for myself. I love it but I'm a bit performance shy. Currently don't even like my girlfriend listening in hah.

Don't worry about that. That's other people's problem, not yours.

Quote
2. Making a choice that I'll later regret because its so obviously wrong

Is 2 a real thing?

This is a bigger concern to me and, yes, it is a thing as I describe above. The main problem is it may take you months to decide that the guitar you bought isn't really the guitar for you.

Quote
With 1 - would it be crazy to just order online and skip the guitar shop experience entirely?

Ideally not. Bear in mind you don't have to play like a virtuoso to know if you like how a guitar feels and plays. I would personally recommend you go and try out the guitar in person (and some others in the shop) before you decide. Or, at least, use an online retailer with a generous returns policy so you can at least have the option of trying it at home and returning it. But a bricks and mortar has the advantage that you can try other models and compare and contrast, and be more certain it's what you really want.

And you would be supporting a local business.

Of course, none of this will prevent the situation where you play for a year or so and then decide you want something different, but that's part of guitar playing and GAS in general.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX, Gibson SG Special P90
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Online close2u

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2020, 09:24:49 pm »
Reading Majik's comments I went to look ... oh boy yeah .... mention of sparkly burgundy suggests this model ... https://www.gibson.com/Guitar/USAQ17249/Les-Paul-Modern/Sparkling-Burgundy-Top

If it is the finish on top of it being a Les Paul then you will be paying $2500 which is a boat load of money just to get a Gibson Les Paul.
You can get absolutely killer Les Pauls for less.
A Standard (standard by the way does not mean ordinary / standard / average / medium ... it means 'the standard against which you should compare others') costs about $500 less.
It is the time-served version.
You can get a Classic for way under $2000.
If you really want the niceties of fit and finish you may not want the Studio models as they are Les Pauls with all the nice finish bits stripped away.

You could also get a Paul Reed Smith S2 singlecut for under $2000

Offline GrowlingDog

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2020, 11:42:42 pm »
I think you get what inspires you to want to play it.  If you can afford it and justify the spend then why not.

A Gibson might be lighter than my Epiphone Les Paul studio, but that is quite heavy and I often find myself grabbing the strat when I want something a bit lighter on my lap.

The person in the shop won’t care how good or not you are.  All you need do is see how comfortable it is.   You aren’t there to demonstrate guitar playing skills and in today’s climate you may be a bit limited on time, you are there to see what it sounds like.

I went to a guitar shop yesterday to look at acoustics.  I had a 45 minute appointment slot and had 8 guitars to look at that I had shortlisted.   I played the same simple things on all of them to compare how they sounded.




Offline antheba

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2020, 11:06:38 am »
Hi all,

Thanks for such an amazing response. Big fan of Justin and his course and great to see the community lives up to the same standards (although the keycaptcha photo thing is soo annoying!)

Going to try and respond to the points made but if I miss one it’s definitely been read and taken on board so thanks.

Yes I’m talking about the Gibson LP Modern. There’s something about the shape of a LP that I love. I also know you can get cheaper brands than Gibson like an Epiphone but there’s something about it being a genuine Gibson that strikes a chord. It doesn’t have to be a Gibson though, and I should check out some alternatives.

I had looked at the Standards but must admit I was a bit confused by the 50s and 60s branding and had figured that the modern must be a better guitar as it’s got improvements that weren’t around in the 50s 60s (not to mention the weight relief which seems the biggest gripe.

You guys are right though - I need to consider a few more guitars more seriously and the only way to do that properly is heading to a guitar shop. I’ll have to suck it up and book a session at a guitar shop.

The PRS Singlecut looks great - I’ll definitely get it on the list. Must admit the PRS bird fret inlays are amazing.

One thing is I’m quite a big guy, so weight is not much of a problem and I find the Strat my friend lent me a bit small to get control of with my right arm vs my acoustic, so I’m wondering whether an electric with a bigger body will be more comfortable for me.

TL;DR - I’m going to bite the bullet and visit a guitar shop.

I need to build the list of guitars I should consider now!

Sounds like:
* Les Paul Modern
* Les Paul Standard
* ESP LP (Eclipse?)
* PRS Singlecut (and maybe the Mccarty 594…)

Bit scared, very excited. Let’s hope I don’t come back with one of each 😄

Online close2u

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2020, 11:56:16 am »
... Thanks for such an amazing response. Big fan of Justin and his course and great to see the community lives up to the same standards (although the key captcha photo thing is soo annoying!)
The community we have here is something we all do our best to foster as a supportive and friendly one so I'm glad you make mention of that.

The captchas disappear after several posts.


Quote
... I had looked at the Standards but must admit I was a bit confused by the 50s and 60s branding...
In brief ... the two main differences are pickups and neck profiles (shape & size).

1950s Standard vs 1960s Standard
pickups:
1950s = Burstbucker 1 & 2 (Alnico II) vs 1960s = Burstbucker 61 R & 61T (Alnico V)
The 60s pickups are said to be a little hotter (more output) and a little brighter in tone. Some differences but maybe only a connoisseur's experience in an A/B comparison situation would notice.

necks:
1950s = chunkier vs 1960s = slimmer
There are no good / better / best comparisons to be made here at all. This is entirely personal feel and preference depending on your hands. You need to feel them. Period.

There are some aesthetic differences too.

Neither are weight-relived. But hey, you're a big guy. And you can easily buy a decent quality, wide leather / suede strap that takes the weight. Thousands have played heavy Les Pauls for years.


 
Quote
...and had figured that the modern must be a better guitar as it’s got improvements that weren’t around in the 50s 60s (not to mention the weight relief which seems the biggest gripe.
It definitely has some modern appointments and changes which may tick your boxes.
There are obviously cosmetic differences but some more substantial ones, besides weight relief, are the compound neck radius and the body cut giving improved upper fret access.
This explains pretty well:





Offline sairfingers

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2020, 10:00:47 pm »
Bottom line, in my opinion. Buy the most expensive, best looking (in your eyes) guitar you can afford. You can’t go wrong! Just make sure you try several out, make sure you like how it sounds, how it looks, make sure you like how it feels in your hands, make sure it fits you. It’s your money, the main thing is buy what makes you want to play guitar. A guitar has to shout out  ‘play me’ when you walk past it in the house.

Don’t listen to those who say ‘you should have bought a .... it’s better value’. If you’ve got the money go for it.
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Offline J.W.C.

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2020, 11:22:20 pm »
My advice:

  • Establish your budget.
  • Try multiple guitars (within your budget) you seem to gravitate towards.
  • Buy the one that most inspires you and lights your fire. Buy the one that screams "play me."

The exact reasons why such-and-such guitar lights your fire aren't as critical as the fact that it lights your fire, and they needn't be quantifiable reasons. They can be purely subjective, "romantic," or even personal reasons that you don't need to justify or explain to anyone. Maybe you like the sound. Maybe you like the feel. Maybe you like color. Maybe you like the brand on the headstock. Maybe you like that it's an old guitar. Maybe you like that it's a new guitar. Maybe you like that it's a "cheapo low rent guitar" made out of formica, or something. Maybe you like that it's a practical, "good value for money" guitar. Maybe you like that it's the most expensive damn thing you could find and afford. Maybe you like the shape. Whatever. As long as those qualities make you want to pick up that guitar and play it, it's all good.

Also, be totally honest with yourself about what you like. Brand is a good example. Say you have two guitars that are exactly the same in all respects except for the brand on the headstock, and Brand A is more expensive than Brand B. But if you have some sort of purely subjective connection or attachment to "Brand A," maybe the additional cost is worth it to you. Again, you don't need to explain or justify that to anyone except yourself. Maybe your purely subjective attraction to "Brand A" make "no sense," but if it makes you like that guitar and want to play it more, I wouldn't say you're "wrong" or making a poor choice. Such value judgments are subjective, like a preference for a color; they don't need to make sense or be justified.



Offline flyingdutchman

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #13 on: October 23, 2020, 09:56:02 am »
For guitars I always have same philosophy. There are few rules, that should be considered by everyone, but apart from that just listen to your heart, know yourself and do what you want to do. I just want to share my humble opinion.

Wrong cliches..."Buy cheap buy 2"...Well maybe that was the case 25 years ago but not any more. it is surprising how cheap productions can compete with famous brands. there is 1 basic reason for that. Famous big brands also moved their production units to the lands and factories that are used by cheap brands, or they hire people with less salaries, or the quality of the raw materials went down so the quality  gap between cheap and expensive squeezed a lot. So 25 years ago the quality gap between a Gibson Les Paul and ESP LTD EC 401 was like the gap between Ferrari and a Volkswagen but now it is like Audi and Opel :))

It also depends on what type of a person you are. if you are sceptic, if you always analyse your decision with pros and cons, if you are an analytical person, you may end up feeling regret with 2.500 USD guitar with beginner skills, when you see a person who is creating miracles with Matsumoto Les Paul style guitar, which costs 250 USD. But if you are a person who does something and does not look back, go for what you really want, you will not question yourself.

now I've got to look for
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Offline stitch101

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Re: Gibson Les Paul Modern
« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2020, 04:41:08 pm »
I think one of the biggest mistake some beginners make is they think the guitar
makes the player. In reality the player makes the guitar.

Good players play good guitars for 2 reasons.
1) Their ears are intune with what they want to hear from years of practice and
experience, and yes good guitars sound better and play easier.
That doesn't mean and inexpensive guitar can't sound great and an expensive
guitar sound like crap. It all in how you play it.

2) They can afford them. It takes a long time to become an accomplished player
and if you truly love playing any instrument you will find a way to save the money
for the instument you want. And with time have more than 1 :)

 

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