Author Topic: B2-0905 C major scale  (Read 1160 times)

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Online close2u

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B2-0905 C major scale
« on: January 01, 2020, 08:29:35 pm »
« Last Edit: August 12, 2020, 08:40:25 am by close2u »

Offline bsp

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2020, 12:11:30 am »
When I learned as a kid, it was also with an anchor. I’m trying without, this time around.

Are there any folk style fingerpickers that have found a benefit in not using an anchor, generally? Seems like avoiding the habit of having one’s pinkie tied up would be an advantage in that realm.

Offline ElectroGuitara

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2021, 08:28:51 pm »
Yesterday I got to this Justin lesson in Lesson 9 -
My question is why Justin contnues beyond note C on the 2d string?

I thought that C Major scale should stretch from C 5th string to C on the 2d string
as I saw in some over videos?
But Justin continues further to 1st string - is he doing this just for practice?
« Last Edit: February 03, 2021, 08:53:25 pm by close2u »

Offline adi_mrok

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2021, 08:59:27 pm »
Hi Electro not sure which lesson you refer to however Justin just moves beyond one octave. I will try to copycat Richard here so hopefully I won't fail! C major scale consists of notes:

C D E F G A B

if he continues on and moves from 3rd fret 2nd string (note C) to 2nd fret 2nd string (note B), then 5th fret 1st string (note A) and 3rd fret 1st string (note G) he still stays in the scale, he just moves down to another octave (down musicwise, up stringwise if that makes sense).

He probably is doing the same at the bottom of the neck - 5th fret string G is note C, and further notes are as scale goes, D E F G and so on but in a higher octave, if you know which notes belong to where on the neck try to figure it out yourself :) if not let me know and I can tell you or probably in the video you mentioned Justin is showing it :)

Just on a personal note I didn't have a clue about this stuff less than year ago until I enrolled to Justin's Practical Music Theory Course. I would recommend for you to enroll at some point to get a better grip of what is happening when you play stuff :)

Sent from my SM-G973F using JustinGuitar Community mobile app


Online close2u

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2021, 09:03:49 pm »
@Electro...
What notes are in the C Major Scale?

C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C right?

If you start on the note C String 5 Fret 3 and finish on the note C String 2 fret 1 you have gone one full octave of the scale:
C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

But, within the span, or range, of playing the scale in that pattern (that is open strings and first three frets) there are other places where some of the C major scale notes can be found. They are:
String 6 open + frets 1 & 3 (E, F, G notes)
String 5 open + fret 2 (A, B notes)
String 2 fret 3 (D note)
String 1 open + frets 1 and 3 (E, F, G notes)

They all belong in the scale.
A scale has no predetermined length or start and finish point. A scale is simply comprised of its root and the total of seven notes within it. The root and notes can be at any pitch, whether very, very low (like on a double bass for example) or very, very high (like on a violin perhaps).
A scale is a continuum of repeating notes.

To train your ear to 'hear' that you are playing C major, it is sensible to start and finish on the note C, usually when practicing playing the scale pattern that would be the lowest available root note within reach of that pattern. But there is no rule saying stop at the next root going up, or going back down.

Look at this diagram. See how all the notes are in the scale?

Offline ElectroGuitara

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2021, 09:06:33 pm »
however Justin just moves beyond one octave. I will try to copycat Richard here so hopefully I won't fail! C major scale consists of notes:
C D E F G A B

Hi Mate, thanks for the tips!  :) Yep, now I got that
but I'd for starters stick to one octave not to mix notes up, so just C -C.

Offline ElectroGuitara

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2021, 09:11:18 pm »
Thanks, mates! And close2u - for moving my questions to this part of forum -
got to FAQ and realised the mistake..

I need now to look at it and mull over :) as I have only BC E Minor beyond
 my shoulders. :)

Offline ElectroGuitara

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Re: B2-0905 C major scale
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2021, 09:27:25 pm »
But, within the span, or range, of playing the scale in that pattern (that is open strings and first three frets) there are other places where some of the C major scale notes can be found. They are:
String 6 open + frets 1 & 3 (E, F, G notes)
String 5 open + fret 2 (A, B notes)
String 2 fret 3 (D note)
String 1 open + frets 1 and 3 (E, F, G notes)

They all belong in the scale.


Yep, thanks again!
Now I got this point but various pitches (going lower for example
after C, D then open 6th string E) sound strange
for me now 'cos I am used to the C Scale on a piano (from lowest to highest)
so for now I will stick to the note C String 5 Fret 3 and finish on the note C String 2
in the descending order.

 

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