Author Topic: B1-501 The C chord  (Read 5159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online tobyjenner

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5405
  • Good Vibes 208
  • You're never too old to Rock'n'Roll
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #50 on: June 30, 2021, 07:22:51 am »
That's great Damien.

Try those finger stretch exercises, they should help and just keep practicing. Also when practicing pick-strum-pick, try putting the 3rd finder down first close to the fret and then stretching to place the other fingers. Do it slowly and deliberately to accentuate the stretch. That should help open the fingers up and become normal, which will then transfer to a good chord when playing songs.

Cheers

Toby
 8)
Here since Mar 2013 Completed BC, RUST 1 & 2, IM, MTMS Still on Blues Rhythm and Blues Lead
https://soundcloud.com/tobyjenner/   
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2wcjHmnrFuQyom6tqUtdrQ
Roadcase : https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=39537

Online close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14768
  • Good Vibes 653
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #51 on: June 30, 2021, 07:51:57 am »
To improve the  hord formation, try this:

Hold your fingers near to but not touching the strings.
Touch the fingers where the chord is but do not press.
Once you have all three touching at the correct place then press them down.
Do not strum - this is a fretting hand exercise only.
Release the pressure after a few seconds but keep touching the strings.
Then move your hand away from the strings by a small amount.
All fingers away.
Repeat the process.

Then, to improve changes to and from the C major chord and other commonly grouped chords, repeat the above process with one alteration. After the final step of lifting all fingers away, the next cycle would be over the chord that you are changing to. Once that chord has been done and fingers are lifted away, go back to the first chord of the pair.

Wash, rinse, repeat.
Make this exercise last about five minutes.

1 minute - C alone
1 minute - C & Am
1 minute - C and G
1 minute - C and D
1 minute - C alone

Within a week you will be smashing it! :)

Offline Jamolay

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
  • Good Vibes 13
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #52 on: June 30, 2021, 02:07:48 pm »
I have similar issues with several cords. Flying fingers, fingers that move the wrong direction as I place other fingers, fingers that seem to go too slow.

It seems that when I first learn a cord, my fingers move in a too slow sequence to actually play it in a song.

What helps is just what Toby, Close and Damien have said. Slow and careful placement, air cords, repetition, intent.

For me, 7 month and Beginner module 10, I keep starting songs and realize a trouble cord. Then I go back and work that cord change slowly, just as Close says, but also I do it leading with different fingers. That way each finger “learns”how to be first and it moves me closer to getting them all down at once (which is the next step).

It is taking time, but is a pretty cool mind! Body challenge. Just remember…intent….focus…slow…repeat a million times.

I am currently working on the full F barre, so am playing “Walk in the wild side” which has C, F and Dm.

I managed 35 BPM yesterday….sooo slow…


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline alantbt

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 26
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #53 on: July 01, 2021, 08:17:11 pm »
Plus 1 for varying the leading finger used on the C, Fmaj7 and G7 chords


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Whether you think you can, or you think you can't – you're right - Henry Ford

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #54 on: July 04, 2021, 06:16:42 pm »
To improve the  hord formation, try this:

Hold your fingers near to but not touching the strings.
Touch the fingers where the chord is but do not press.
Once you have all three touching at the correct place then press them down.
Do not strum - this is a fretting hand exercise only.
Release the pressure after a few seconds but keep touching the strings.
Then move your hand away from the strings by a small amount.
All fingers away.
Repeat the process.

May be a daft question but how do you know you have fretted correctly if you don't strum?

Offline Jamolay

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
  • Good Vibes 13
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #55 on: July 04, 2021, 06:59:39 pm »
May be a daft question but how do you know you have fretted correctly if you don't strum?
It is breaking the cord playing into parts. First sort out the gross finger movements, then, once that is pretty good, add I’m the fine tuning and check with a strum and by picking strings.

If you try too much at once, it is much harder to learn.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #56 on: July 10, 2021, 11:31:12 am »
It is breaking the cord playing into parts. First sort out the gross finger movements, then, once that is pretty good, add I’m the fine tuning and check with a strum and by picking strings.


But Closes' comment was "Do not strum - this is a fretting hand exercise only." So how do you know if your fingers are in the right place if you don't strum?

Online close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14768
  • Good Vibes 653
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #57 on: July 10, 2021, 11:44:52 am »
May be a daft question but how do you know you have fretted correctly if you don't strum?
That is not a daft question at all.
You have chord perfect practice with strum-pick-strum where you are very consciously forming a chord, playing a chord, listening for clear notes, making micro adjustments etc.
You have one-minute changes for speed of chord change and fluidity of movement.
This exercise is an adjunct to those. You are training your fingers to land together.
The chord perfect practice will have trained / will be training your fingers to make the exact perfect chord formation.
This exercise is all about sequentiality vs simultaneousness.
Many players find it hard to break out of placing fingers one at a time.
This is designed to break that along with forming and changing.
You need to consider exercises as being complementary.
If you bring in to this exercise strumming, listening, micro adjustments for muted notes etc it will slow everything down and you will not achieve enough of what this is designed to do.

Offline Jamolay

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
  • Good Vibes 13
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #58 on: July 10, 2021, 02:19:26 pm »
Not to quote myself or anything…


If you try too much at once, it is much harder to learn.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2021, 09:04:31 am »
Not to quote myself or anything…

If that is referring to my post I haven't a clue what you are on about!!

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #60 on: July 11, 2021, 03:12:44 pm »
That is not a daft question at all.
You have chord perfect practice with strum-pick-strum where you are very consciously forming a chord, playing a chord, listening for clear notes, making micro adjustments etc.
You have one-minute changes for speed of chord change and fluidity of movement.
This exercise is an adjunct to those. You are training your fingers to land together.
The chord perfect practice will have trained / will be training your fingers to make the exact perfect chord formation.
This exercise is all about sequentiality vs simultaneousness.
Many players find it hard to break out of placing fingers one at a time.
This is designed to break that along with forming and changing.
You need to consider exercises as being complementary.
If you bring in to this exercise strumming, listening, micro adjustments for muted notes etc it will slow everything down and you will not achieve enough of what this is designed to do.

Thanks for that. You mentioned "sequentially vs simultaneousness" but for me to do this exercise I have to sequentially place the figures first. Kind of defeats the object. You would this that after 6 months of trying to do this chord some of it would stick!!

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #61 on: July 11, 2021, 03:15:44 pm »
One of the other issues I have is that due to the problems with my hand my ring finger can't/wont reach the 3rd fret and sits between the second & third when forming the chord.

Offline GNS

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #62 on: July 13, 2021, 04:49:20 pm »
One of the other issues I have is that due to the problems with my hand my ring finger can't/wont reach the 3rd fret and sits between the second & third when forming the chord.

You can always try finger-stretching exercises (you will not find improvement in an hour or a day, heck, I saw an improvement only in about a month after doing them for couple of minutes a day or even less) or put your pinky finger on the third fret.

Addendum, since you have this problem from 2020, alternatively, you can always play Cm7 chord, which is 1st finger on the fourth string of the second freth and 2nd finger on the fifth string of the third fret.

Or the one finger version (super simplified) of the C chord, which is the 1st finger on the second string of the first fret, and you strum string 1 to 3.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 05:47:25 pm by GNS »

Offline stuartw

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #63 on: July 17, 2021, 05:37:11 pm »
You can always try finger-stretching exercises (you will not find improvement in an hour or a day, heck, I saw an improvement only in about a month after doing them for couple of minutes a day or even less) or put your pinky finger on the third fret.
Finger stretching is something I start with on every session. I can stretch the fingers further apart but this not helping with my third finger.

Addendum, since you have this problem from 2020, alternatively, you can always play Cm7 chord, which is 1st finger on the fourth string of the second fret and 2nd finger on the fifth string of the third fret.
I have tried that and actually think that this is a better sounding chord than C.

Offline GNS

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: B1-501 The C chord
« Reply #64 on: July 18, 2021, 10:50:01 am »
Finger stretching is something I start with on every session. I can stretch the fingers further apart but this not helping with my third finger.
I have tried that and actually think that this is a better sounding chord than C.

Glad it worked for you. Still, despite that, you should occasionally still keep trying the full C chord configuration. Who knows, maybe one day, you will find yourself being able to do it. 

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App