Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 751 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline dkiewicz

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Southern Rock
« on: February 26, 2020, 03:36:38 pm »
Hey Justin!!!! Still waiting for you to drop by JPL...  ;D

I was wondering if you could focus on techniques in sort of a sub genre way. For example Southern Rock seems to have some different (to me at least) techniques. Maybe I'm missing something, but there always seems to be "color" that is added to make a certain sound that isn't just an equipment feature.

Gimme 3 steps is one example. Maybe I'm making it more difficult, but it would help to recognize things a bit easier when you understand the technique.

Loving the lessons as I'm now retired, but still finding time is tough but I've made tons of progress once I bought the intermediate lesson set.

Take care and keep making people happy, you do a great job!!!

Dan Kiewicz...

Offline deadeye_ag

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 459
  • Good Vibes 12
    • Texas Music Blog
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2020, 12:10:04 am »
Hi Dan,

I'm a southern rock guy and I'm wondering what techniques you are referring to. Southern rock, like rock, like country, are a derivative of blues, which Justin covers in his courses. Do you have a specific example?

Offline tobyjenner

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3507
  • Good Vibes 121
  • You're never too old to Rock'n'Roll
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2020, 10:30:04 am »
To me its more about getting the sound right, amp, effects etc. Technique wise I would say its pretty generic skill wise, as has been said as its derived from the Blues. I know I struggle to get a sound set up just right say for Skynyrd for example even using other folks downloads. Takes a lot of tweaking.

But hey if there are specific techniques, that ain't slide, I would love to know.

Cheers

Toby
 8)
Arrived here Mar 2013 Since completed BC, RUST 1 & 2, IM and MTMS Now on Blues Rhythm and Blues Lead
My Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/tobyjenner/
Roadcase : https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=39537.msg339454#msg33945

Offline stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5155
  • Good Vibes 196
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2020, 03:23:39 pm »
@Toby, this is just a general answer but should give you good idea of Skynyrds tone.
Gary Rossongton gets his unique sound using a Gibson Les Paul
and Peavey amp. Also clean settings.

Allen Collins used a Gibson Firebird and Marshall combo in the beginning
the switch to Peavey later on. Also clean settings.

Ed King used both Strats and LPs also clean settings.

Steve Gaines mostly LP but also used Strats. Peavey and Fender Reverb amps.
Clean settings

So I think a lot of the tone comesfrom clean setting on Peavey amps and a whole
lot of talent.  :)

Offline tobyjenner

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3507
  • Good Vibes 121
  • You're never too old to Rock'n'Roll
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2020, 04:19:33 pm »
@Toby, this is just a general answer but should give you good idea of Skynyrds tone.
Gary Rossongton gets his unique sound using a Gibson Les Paul
and Peavey amp. Also clean settings.

Allen Collins used a Gibson Firebird and Marshall combo in the beginning
the switch to Peavey later on. Also clean settings.

Ed King used both Strats and LPs also clean settings.

Steve Gaines mostly LP but also used Strats. Peavey and Fender Reverb amps.
Clean settings

So I think a lot of the tone comesfrom clean setting on Peavey amps and a whole
lot of talent.  :)

@Stitch = So with my LP Studio and Roadhouse Deluxe Strat, Peavey  emulation on the Mustang, I'm good to go.......................go look for the talent that is. Thanks for the advice on amps and tone, was happy with their gtr usage over the years. 8)
Arrived here Mar 2013 Since completed BC, RUST 1 & 2, IM and MTMS Now on Blues Rhythm and Blues Lead
My Soundcloud : https://soundcloud.com/tobyjenner/
Roadcase : https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=39537.msg339454#msg33945

Online CT

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1911
  • Good Vibes 97
    • YouTube
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2020, 10:28:31 pm »
Learn your rhythm guitar, blues, pentatonic scale and power chords for general study, and for specific songs check out youtube tutorials:



Tons of great teachers and lessons out there, if Justin doesn't have a song lesson.

Offline sairfingers

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 597
  • Good Vibes 24
  • 󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿The guitar is the coolest instrument in the world
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 11:17:57 pm »
Southern Rock. Is this Americana?
Started with JG Feb 2018. BC (classic) completed, now on IM, Folk Fingerstyle and some Blues licks and impro...😎
Martin D28 : Gibson SG : Boss Katana 50.

Offline Drubbing

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3276
  • Good Vibes 101
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2020, 01:03:27 am »
I've never heard any particular techniques in Skynryd that wasn't largely blues based. They were a rock band with Southern accents. Apart from the gear, their sound came from the swing they put into their rhythm.

A track like the Breeze was a JJ Cale tune - he mixed up folk, blues, country, jazz, so Skynryd would have had some elements of those rhythms in their music. JJ was a big influence, but a quiet man.

Online CT

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1911
  • Good Vibes 97
    • YouTube
Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2020, 01:47:35 am »
Southern Rock. Is this Americana?
It's basically localized rock with blues marbling. Lynyrd Skynyrd mentions a "She 'Gator" in one of their songs -- can't get more highly localized than that. ;) 

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App