Author Topic: Teacher said next lesson: A song with a solo to learn and analyse in detail  (Read 742 times)

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Offline emann

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hi close2u...yes this is quite new but there again it is more to learn.

I will also try to look up this theoretical concept and then ask my teacher about....if by chance you have any links that explain this in detail then please let me know.

Offline stitch101

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Hope this helps and makes sense.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_chord

Offline emann

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stitch101...perfect..that is a really great and detailed explanation.

thanks a lot.

Offline Matt125

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You have raised something that I see as a big issue & drawback with your teacher's idea of homework.

Your teacher knows the extent of your physical ability & your theoretical knowledge.
The open ended nature of this means you could stumble down a wormhole of harmonic complexity when it comes to playing and analysing the solo & the chords


I tend to agree with close2u on this. Rock songs are often non diatonic. You often play chords that are not strictly diatonic. You very frequently play a minor pentatonic scale over a major chord progression. Why? Because it just sounds good. Since many rock songs “don’t follow the rules” it can be quite difficult and confusing when trying to determine the key. Keep in mind that music theory is descriptive not prescriptive.

I recently came across the video below which expands on these ideas.  On the one hand I was a little reluctant to post it because it has a lot of technical information which can be difficult to follow. On the other hand it gives a great message about how to think about songs that don’t follow the rules. So don’t worry too much if it is overly technical.

Well done with your analysis so far.

“What makes ROCK sound like ROCK?”



Offline emann

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Thanks Matt125...aaa Paul Davids...one of my other favourite teachers...I was lucky to get his next level guitar course as an early xmas gift from my wifeyy...i really like this guy and I also appreciate your input into this thread and encouragement Matt.

Offline stitch101

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Did you notice the 5 chords he mentions as the first 5 chords learnt on a guitar
just happen to be the 5 chords of the CAGED system?
That is because that is how the neck of a guitar is layed out.

Offline emann

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as an update...this is were i arrived till now (please copy link in browser)

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1WzJWdh0dcZt83RwghCEVmU_5hk0skKeQ

kindly advise your thoughts please.

Now I am also attaching a tab of what i am playing for the solo part in order to understand what notes and scale is being used.  First I hope that I am using the correct notes but from transcribe these are really the closest I can match.  Secondly these are the first notes of the solo but for goodness sake none of the notes are in the G major scale or pentatonics right?  so quite confused at this stage.

c# -f #- g# - a# - c# - g# - f#

https://photos.app.goo.gl/HcHtumTM8Sp2zBiv9

any help?

Offline stitch101

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Are you tuned to Eb.
I haven't played patiance with the original recording for many years but I'm
sure it's in Eb tuning. I think all G&R tunes are in Eb tuning.

Offline emann

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aaww...that explains it all...i could hear that i was sure that i am matching the notes of the solo but then when played against the chords could notice something seems not right...

thanks to point this out.

Offline stitch101

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I checked your tabs and if you're playing in standard tuning that's what is off.
If you want to play in standard tuning tune the original in transcribe up 1/2 a step
or tune your guitar down 1/2 a step. You'll need to adjust your tabs for the tuning.

If you need to jump up more than 5 notes pick a note on the next thinest string instead.
The less you need to move your hand the smother your playing will be.

Offline emann

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thanks a lot stitch101..this is really helpful from your end.

how can i tune transcribe up half a step...is it from a command in the software itself please?

Offline stitch101

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I'm not sure in transcibe (I don't use it). But there should be a setting in it some
where to bump the tuning up to E and maintain the integrity of the song.
The softwear I use there is a drop down window with a plus and minus to change
the pitch. Should be something similar in Transcibe.

Offline emann

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found it stitch101...and managed to transcribe it as well (i am getting even faster now!)

Hope you manage to listen to this clip and let me know your thoughts.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ZE2_UvfnuRhlustjwjPEDiMI9G-K_3QH

 

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