Author Topic: Electric guitar  (Read 634 times)

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Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2019, 10:42:12 pm »
Thanks again for your help, I’m in Aberdeen so anyUK supplier would work.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2019, 10:55:20 pm by close2u »

Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2019, 10:54:40 pm »
I have sent you a pm

yes you can buy the Yamaha Pacifica online and it will / should be set up okay to start although new strings won't come in wrong as they may have been on a long time in manufacture, transport, warehousing etc.

Thanks and replied.

Offline Styrr

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #17 on: October 10, 2019, 10:59:35 am »
Personally; whilst the Yamaha Pacifica is a solid choice for a beginner, it may not be the choice for you. Crucial for this is what type of music genre(s) you like and want to try playing.

After a very quick google search can find at least 4 music stores  in Aberdeen with web presences. My advice is go see what is available. The 2 primary considerations when buying a guitar are:-
1)   How it feels and looks to you. Does the neck feel comfortable?  Is the body shape right and most importantly is it easy to play.
2)   Sound. Is the pickup configuration going to give you the type of voicing you want to play? Do you want single coils, humbuckers or a combination of these ?

As a beginner you can only figure these out if you try them. The advantages of shopping in a store are many. Not least that they should set up your guitar for you. You might not get the best price for your purchase, but most stores will go quite a way to match online retailers. They will usually throw in some useful accessories for a reduced price (or free) such as a strap, gigbag, cables, picks etc.

What have you to lose to go and see? And don’t overlook used in the stores.

Good luck on your search
Styrr
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Offline nigec

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2019, 02:13:52 pm »
Fine advice from Keith.
To bulk it out a little with some of the most well known guitar types:

Squier Classic Vibe series Telecaster or Stratocaster.
G&L Tribute series ASAT or Legacy.
Epiphone Les Paul, Dot or ES339.

Amps:

Blackstar ID: Core 10, 20 or BEAM
Roland Cube
Fender Mustang I or II version 2
Boss Katana Mini or even bigger
Yamaha THR

I have the Classic Vibe 60's Strat and the Fender Mustang Mk1
Great guitar, if you do buy one run a die down the tremolo bar threads, mine was very tight
Quality is very good..
Mustang.. I'm one the wall with mine, the master volume is horrendous and hard to set,  for a split second it sounds louder than it actually is, it sound synthesised to me.

Both of them are 7 years old this month, and still going strong, I messed about with the Strat but out of choice it didn't need it, its has phase switching and a different bridge
Guitars:  Squier classic vibe Stratocaster; Fender look alike Jazz bass from a kit, Cigarbox 3 string, Uke, Mandolin and the devil loves a tryer!

Offline Rossco01

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2019, 03:09:07 pm »
I've got a Pacifica 112v and had it about 7-8 years now. It's faultless guitar and allows you to play a pretty diverse array of styles. The Humbucker + Single + Single config gives you quite a lot of flexibility and the Coil tap knob (pull up the Tone knob) allows you to split the humbucker to single coil.

As a beginner I think it's pretty daunting going into a guitar shop. Most of the online stores have pretty generous return policies if needed. If you do go into a store as a beginner you're really checking out the feel and weight. Does it feel comfortable to hold in your fretting hand and does the weight/size feel right. I've not got large hands the Pacifica feels nice and comfortable.

Second hand you'll probably get a good deal if you do go the Pacifica route (I think mine was £120 mint second hand) just make sure of the model you're buying there are a few 112 variations which look similar.
Epiphone Masterbilt DR500MCE, Yamaha Pacifica 112V, Fender Mustang 1v2, Katana 100, Trio Plus, Zoom MS50G
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Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2019, 04:09:59 pm »
Folks thanks for all the recommendations, it’s much appreciated.

I’ve ordered a Pacifica 112V today for £219 and it should be here tomorrow along with a stand and a new set of strings. I also bought a Katana Air and whilst I could have got that tomorrow too from the same place as the guitar they wanted £370 and wouldn’t price match so I bought that elsewhere for £330 but will have to wait until Monday for that.

Offline close2u

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2019, 07:46:26 pm »
Congrats on the NGD and NAD.

What colour Pacifica did you choose?

Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2019, 09:58:06 pm »
Congrats on the NGD and NAD.

What colour Pacifica did you choose?

Old Violin Sunburst.

Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2019, 11:28:08 pm »
So my guitar and amp turned up today, the Pacifica is a thing of beauty  :)

So how does it play bearing in mind I’m a 3 chord strummer, well I’m actually upto 7 1/2 chords now, that damn C chord  >:(

Well despite checking the nut width online and thinking it was the same size as my acoustic it’s quite a bit thinner and the space between the frets is less. So I struggled at first with most chords, less space to cram my fingers into for A and of course the strings are a little closer together making the G more challenging as I kept muting the third string. However with an hours practise I’m getting there cramming those porkers in for A and arching my fingers around a bit more for G. Heaven help me with C as that’s quite a challenge for me on the acoustic as I nearly always mute G string with my first finger. I did notice I don’t have to press the strings anywhere near as hard which helped accidently muting strings, onwards and upwards.

I got the amp up and running and don’t have a clue what all the switches do yet but I downloaded the app and you can set up effects from the app and the effects have quite descriptive names which you can save then just select that effect from the app and it’s adjusts everything automatically. So lots to learn with the amp but easy to get it to make a noise pretty quickly, the acoustic guitar simulation effect was quite impressive.

For a tiny lightweight amp it has more than enough oomph for the house.

So far so good  :)

Offline sairfingers

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2019, 02:36:11 pm »
I did notice I don’t have to press the strings anywhere near as hard
Yes that’s the main difference I found when I first got my electric. I still really have to make a concious effort and work at not pressing the strings too hard otherwise the notes go sharp. Lower action, lighter strings and a shorter scale length than my acoustic all contribute to the need for less pressure.

My advice is concentrate on using less pressure than you’re used to on the strings. That way you won’t have to ‘relearn’ anything.
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Boss Katana 50 : Digitech Trio+ & FS3X : Dunlop Cry Baby Classic.
Arrived here Feb 2018. BC completed and now on IM & fingerstyle modules. Played a Framus 5/50 Archtop as a teenager in the early 70’s.

Offline close2u

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2019, 03:48:08 pm »
Glad you got sorted and are happy with everything - enjoy.
:)

Offline GregB

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2019, 08:13:47 pm »
Yes that’s the main difference I found when I first got my electric. I still really have to make a concious effort and work at not pressing the strings too hard otherwise the notes go sharp. Lower action, lighter strings and a shorter scale length than my acoustic all contribute to the need for less pressure.

My advice is concentrate on using less pressure than you’re used to on the strings. That way you won’t have to ‘relearn’ anything.

Yes I’ll do that, I’m hoping less pressure will help with the string muting of C.
I had a go at adjusting the action as when I measured at the 12th fret it was 2.5 mm so I adjusted to 1.5mm.

I might take it and get it set up properly next week.

Offline sairfingers

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Re: Electric guitar
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2019, 10:26:32 pm »
I had a go at adjusting the action as when I measured at the 12th fret it was 2.5 mm so I adjusted to 1.5mm.
Be careful you don’t go too low. The thinner strings on electric vibrate more and you might start to get fret buzz.
Martin D28 Reimagined : Gibson SG Standard.
Boss Katana 50 : Digitech Trio+ & FS3X : Dunlop Cry Baby Classic.
Arrived here Feb 2018. BC completed and now on IM & fingerstyle modules. Played a Framus 5/50 Archtop as a teenager in the early 70’s.

 

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