Author Topic: Recording newbie seeking microphone  (Read 815 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DarkHorse

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 61
  • Good Vibes 3
Recording newbie seeking microphone
« on: December 18, 2018, 07:16:48 am »
Hello folks
I'm a newbie to recording and am looking to obtain a microphone within the next few days. My intention is to make a small EP (probably 4 tracks) all with multiple guitar parts using Audacity. I have the help of a friend and would like to do it before Christmas.
A bit more info: I reckon all the tracks will have at least one acoustic guitar part in it, some will have electric, possibly some uke and vocals.
I don't have a lot of cash to spend on this but don't want to sacrifice quality.
Any suggestions?
Thankyou


Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app


Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11145
  • Good Vibes 430
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2018, 08:17:17 am »
Besides your actual computer running Audacity (what type of computer is it btw?) do you have / intend buying any other hardware or are you looking for a mic direct in to your computer?

Offline DarkHorse

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 61
  • Good Vibes 3
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2018, 12:18:05 pm »
Thanks close2u.

It has Windows 8.1 and 4GB RAM. What other information is important?
If it's not possible to simply use one mic then I'm willing to buy more equipment, but I'm attracted to the simplicity of the first option.

Offline CT

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1070
  • Good Vibes 61
    • YouTube
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2018, 03:34:07 pm »
Most folks recommend the Shure SM57 or SM58. Lots of music you hear on the radio have been recorded with these mics. They are almost industry standards.

I own two mics, both are high value propositions, both work well and offer a lot of flexibility: Behringer B2PRO & Behringer XM8500.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2018, 04:43:48 pm by CT »

Offline DarkHorse

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 61
  • Good Vibes 3
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2018, 04:14:32 pm »
Thanks CT. Is it used for recording instruments as well as vocals?

Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app


Offline CT

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1070
  • Good Vibes 61
    • YouTube
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2018, 04:42:29 pm »
Yes, they both can be used for mic'ing amps, instruments and vocals. I have some plans for making a few explorational mic recordings. You're just a tad early for those. I do have an amp demo, mic'ing two amps and comparing with the Behringer XM8500, which is a great entry level/value ($20 US) mic:
https://soundcloud.com/user-35496968/mp-15-vs-mustang-65-twin-reverb-jazzy
The XM8500 is almost identical to the Shure SM58 that costs about $80 US. 

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1968
  • Good Vibes 120
Re: Recording newbie seeking microphone
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2018, 04:59:43 pm »
These are all great mic options. However, you can't just plug these into your computer.

You will need some sort of audio interface to plug the mic into. This will need at least one input suitable for connecting a microphone. Most of these mics will require a balanced XLR input.

A suitable interface can be purchased from about £30 (such as the Behringer U-Phoria UM2). You would normally plug your speakers into this too.

The alternative is to get a "USB Microphone" which is basically a microphone with a built in audio input interface. These can be good, but aren't as flexible as a separate microphone and audio interface, and a decent one will cost about the same as a separate mic and basic audio interface like the UM2.


Why can't you use the audio interface built into your PC? Well, the main reason is that they don't normally have inputs suitable for the type of microphone recommended above. The other reason is they are usually not very high quality. Once you have a suitable audio interface, it makes sense to use this for playback too (if only so you don't need to keep switching audio devices within Windows).

Note, even with something like the UM2, this is a cheap interface. It's not rubbish by any means, but it won't be as good as a more expensive interface such as those from Focusrite, Roland, Universal Audio, etc. or even more expensive models from Behringer. The primary difference between these tends to be the quality of the analogue preamps (the bit of electronics which amplifies the extremely low-level signal from the microphone before converting it to a digital signal).

But, if you are looking to start out with a minimal setup then, IMO, the UM2 is probably good enough.

Cheers,

Keith

P.S. Remember to purchase an XLR microphone cable too.
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App