Author Topic: Chord Progressions  (Read 1021 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline srisitt

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 5
  • Good Vibes 0
Chord Progressions
« on: April 25, 2018, 04:00:37 pm »
I'm trying to understand chord progressions further. I came up with this progression today and I'm not quite sure how to label it.

It goes DMaj (E shape 10th fret) to C#min (E shape 9th fret) to EMaj (A shape 7th fret).

If this is in the key of DMaj, the first chord is I. C# is the 7th degree in the key of DMaj, but in the major scale chord progression, the 7th should be diminished. So would this make the second chord in this progression a VII#5? Is that the proper way to write this?




Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1930
  • Good Vibes 107
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2018, 09:38:43 pm »
I would call that D Lydian, in which case it's a I-vii-II sequence of D-C#min-E

No special chord names needed.

Cheers,

Keith

Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app

Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline Cue Zephyr

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6972
  • Good Vibes 90
  • Who's picking the banjo here?
    • Ezyo Music
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2018, 11:26:12 pm »
It depends, mostly on the melody and how it resolves.

I would call that a bVII-vi-I in E. A bVII chord is quite common.

Going only by chords, I would start calling it D Lydian when playing a D Lydian chord in that same progression. To play a D Lydian chord in the E shape voicing, add your pinky on the 13th fret on the G string.
Guitar, banjo, mandolin and piano, bass and percussion only when needed
Production and mixing

Online close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11008
  • Good Vibes 416
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2018, 11:57:48 pm »
Manikin (Majik ... sorry Keith ... strange auto-correct on smartphone) & Cue can both be right.

Look at it this way.

You have two Major chords a tone apart namely D and E.
If you're thinking Major scale, that can only happen in the A Major scale where D is thecIV and E is the V. C# is the iii.
But there is no A Major chord.
So that's a bit strange - it can't make sense to call it in the key of A Major.
So think modal nstead.
If D is the home base, the chord of resolution, then you are thinking of the 4th mode of A Major which is D Lydian.
If E is the home base - you don't start there but it feels like home when you get there - then you would think of the 5th mode of A Major which is E mixolydian.
I hesitate to do similar with the C# minor perspective as it is probably a passing chord rather than a tonic.


I once had an argument with a keyboard player over Dreams by FleetwoodcMac.
It does something similar ... two Major chords a tone apart (F and G) plus a minor chord (A minor).
He insisted it was in the key of C Major.
He referred to his sheet music - no sharps of flats. He showed how he was only playing the white keys. He was adamant.
I tried to explain that the song did not contain a single C Major chord anywhere, that it was based around the sound of the F chord, that it was F Lydian.
He enlisted the support of his piano teacher who told him, of my opinions, he's a guitarist, he would see it like that.

 :)
« Last Edit: April 27, 2018, 06:46:41 am by close2u »

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1930
  • Good Vibes 107
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2018, 01:11:31 am »
@Cue,

There's not really any such thing as a "D Lydian chord". They are all diatonic chords which fit into the D Lydian mode, if that's what you mean.

But in that case, D major is the tonic/root chord. The 7th equivalent would be Dmaj7 (D, F#, A, and C#).

Adding the 13th-fret G string would add a G#. This is in the Lydian scale, but would, I guess, be an 11th extension. Regardless, there's nothing about doing that would make that more or less "Lydian". In fact it sounds pretty discordant to me, and I would only ever use it as a passing chord to add colour.

You and Close2u are correct, however, it could easily be E (specifically Mixolydian or one of the other equivalent modes). With only a three chord sequence to go on, it's not really possible to tell, although it's unlikely to be rooted on anything except D or E.

It's also fairly academic as, regardless of which of the modes it is, the triads are:

D, E, F#min, G#o, A, Bm, Cm

All that happens is the starting point changes depending on the mode, so for E Mixolydian:

E, F#min, G#o, A, Bm, Cm, D

For A major:
A, Bm, Cm, D, E, F#min, G#o

etc.

If you want to consider 7th chords for this key, they are:

Dmaj7, E7, F#min7, G#ΓΈ, Amaj7, Bm7, Cm7

If you want to do fancy chord extensions, that fine too, but doing so isn't necessary to make a song sound  like a particular mode.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline srisitt

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 5
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2018, 04:58:39 am »
These are all great responses, thank you all for the help. It's good to see this community is still thriving.

Offline Cue Zephyr

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6972
  • Good Vibes 90
  • Who's picking the banjo here?
    • Ezyo Music
Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2018, 11:08:38 pm »
I've watched a lot of Rick Beato's theory videos and I didn't know there was such a thing as modal chords either. Upon discovering you could just call something a Lydian chord I went with it. It perfectly describes the function of the chord, too - a chord that implies modality.

I use #4/#11 chords all the time to imply Lydian. Why? Because you're emphasizing that #4 degree.

It sounds discordant because you're not used ot it. I was the same way with 7th chords and after that with altered chords upon discovering them.

The above is why I'm usually not inclined to call something modal unless there's an emphasis on the tone that makes it modal, or on the tonic. That's why I chose to describe it as E major, where the D major is modal interchange.
Guitar, banjo, mandolin and piano, bass and percussion only when needed
Production and mixing

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App