Author Topic: vkk  (Read 1706 times)

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Offline DavidP

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Re: vkk
« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2018, 03:24:38 pm »
I think you are making excellent progress on the strumming, vkk.  You are sounding steady on the D-D-D-D- strumming on both the songs you played.  Keep going with this, eg I am sure you can in time it will sound even better playing Live Forever with that rhythm just at a faster tempo ... provided you keep in time and make the changes smoothly.

As I recall, by the end of stage 4, Justin introduced additional patterns ... D-D-DUDU or D-DUDUD- ... I forget the specific patterns.  So based on where you are in terms of the chords you are using, you could start playing some of the simpler songs where you are more automated on the changes with these patterns.

You are right about the jump to stage 5 ... for me getting the trip-let strumming right took some effort.  But only made possible by getting solid on the use of the up-strums in the preceding lessons.

And all the work done up get stage 5 done, positions you for stage 6 when Justin introduces the skip of a down-strum, what he calls "old faithful" since it can sound so good on so many songs ... don't know why but that skipped down-strum somehow makes a huge difference.

You are also correct, if I understand correctly, that often the final up-strum of beat 4 is on open strums, particularly when you start to play at faster tempos ... just not enough time between the down of beat 4 and down of beat 1 of the next measure to make a chord change, so the change is made over the "&" at the end of the bar.

As for the finger-picking...from a Justin BC perspective that comes later.  Nothing wrong with starting earlier, if you have the time to practice more.  Just bring through the same principles you used when learning the strumming.  That is, keep it slow and simple at first. 

So pick a basic pattern and work on getting it smooth on a single chord.  I'd suggest starting on either an Em and G ... my reason being that the bass note played with the thumb is the 6th string for both.  And  only start changing back and forth between the chords once you feel reasonably fluent on the basic pattern, eg thumb on 6, ring 1, middle 2, index 3.  And that could be played as 4 quarter notes i.e. one note per metronome click. I think getting that basic control of the right hand fingers will set you up to play more elaborate patterns and in time be able to pick out melodies in a chord progression and ultimately, be more like a Mark Knopfler and finger riffs/licks with the lefthand that are picked with individual fingers rather than with a plectrum ... but all starts (even for Knopfler, I heard him say so) with getting the basics solid.

Keep at it, you are sounding good on those songs strummed simply ...

Offline vkk1991

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Re: vkk
« Reply #46 on: May 16, 2018, 05:26:28 am »
Today was a strumming focus day, put the metronome at 60 BPM(pattern D D D U D) and played the Em chord for 5 minutes. Very slow, but this is the best point to start.

Then, i went back to 4 downstrums per bar, and after the 4th downstrum, add empty upstrum before nailing the next chord change. Worked with A and E chords here at 60 BPM. Just get used to that empty upstrum. 

Finally, i worked 3 one minute changes:
B7 -> Dm = 40
C7 -> Dm = 37
G -> Dm = 40

Id like to bring these up to 50+ in the short term.

I think you are making excellent progress on the strumming, vkk.  You are sounding steady on the D-D-D-D- strumming on both the songs you played.  Keep going with this, eg I am sure you can in time it will sound even better playing Live Forever with that rhythm just at a faster tempo ... provided you keep in time and make the changes smoothly.

As I recall, by the end of stage 4, Justin introduced additional patterns ... D-D-DUDU or D-DUDUD- ... I forget the specific patterns.  So based on where you are in terms of the chords you are using, you could start playing some of the simpler songs where you are more automated on the changes with these patterns.

You are right about the jump to stage 5 ... for me getting the trip-let strumming right took some effort.  But only made possible by getting solid on the use of the up-strums in the preceding lessons.

And all the work done up get stage 5 done, positions you for stage 6 when Justin introduces the skip of a down-strum, what he calls "old faithful" since it can sound so good on so many songs ... don't know why but that skipped down-strum somehow makes a huge difference.

You are also correct, if I understand correctly, that often the final up-strum of beat 4 is on open strums, particularly when you start to play at faster tempos ... just not enough time between the down of beat 4 and down of beat 1 of the next measure to make a chord change, so the change is made over the "&" at the end of the bar.

As for the finger-picking...from a Justin BC perspective that comes later.  Nothing wrong with starting earlier, if you have the time to practice more.  Just bring through the same principles you used when learning the strumming.  That is, keep it slow and simple at first. 

So pick a basic pattern and work on getting it smooth on a single chord.  I'd suggest starting on either an Em and G ... my reason being that the bass note played with the thumb is the 6th string for both.  And  only start changing back and forth between the chords once you feel reasonably fluent on the basic pattern, eg thumb on 6, ring 1, middle 2, index 3.  And that could be played as 4 quarter notes i.e. one note per metronome click. I think getting that basic control of the right hand fingers will set you up to play more elaborate patterns and in time be able to pick out melodies in a chord progression and ultimately, be more like a Mark Knopfler and finger riffs/licks with the lefthand that are picked with individual fingers rather than with a plectrum ... but all starts (even for Knopfler, I heard him say so) with getting the basics solid.

Keep at it, you are sounding good on those songs strummed simply ...

Thanks for the details!

The first thing i tried to do today was to do D D U Miss U D chord change upstrum then D D U Miss U D.
That ended up horribly. Trying to do too many things at once, one part at a time. So for now, D D D D Upstrum and D D D U D Upstrum is all i need.
 
The most humbling thing about practicing is that its merciless.
I know exactly what sounds terrible, and there is no way that trying to speed up playing is going to benefit because ill be sure to miss beats, miss strums etc.. and it just takes a lot of practice to get something to sound as good as Id like to make it sound.

I even took a sneak peek at stage 5 and it only gets more involved from there.. Theres power chords, F barre chord (which i managed to get, but switching between that and open chords is another adventure entirely), learn the notes, and it will all come in due time.. Just focus on enjoying where i am and keep in mind that the beginners course is structured in a way that you wont be fed more than you can chew.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2018, 03:47:56 pm by vkk1991 »

Offline DavidP

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Re: vkk
« Reply #47 on: May 16, 2018, 06:02:32 am »
What you say in your latest update makes sense, sounds wise.  Justin has developed this BC based on many, many years of teaching experience.  The sequence is put together intentionally.  I'm sure not the only way to learn but it is tried and tested.

At stage 4 you have a chord vocabulary that is sufficient to play a vast catalogue of songs.  And you can start to use the up strums to make the songs more interesting. Listening to you I am sure it won't take long before you are smoothly playing songs with up-strums. 

A good one I found to experiment with was Mad World.  You can use a different pattern for the verse and chorus and it starts to sound quite musical.  Yes that skipped down-strum will make it sound even better but not if trying it causes the chord changes to deteriorate and your playing to become hesitant.

Keep at it, slow and steady (as you are), and you will see the benefits.  I think if you never go beyond the BC, you'll be able to sound really good and impress your friends and family for sure.  Of course once the BC is done one will surely yearn to become better, but by completing it with patient diligence you will become a guitar player.

 

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