Author Topic: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins  (Read 11633 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Online DavidP

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 4516
  • Good Vibes 246
  • You're always learning about guitars-Keef Richards
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2018, 09:59:52 am »
Thanks Richard

Little letters for minor chords and not repeating chords ... got you

Careless, not paying attention ... should be D7

Not stressing about which pattern it is in CAGED.

Replaced minor with minor 7th ... got you.

And as it happens, I fly out to the USA this evening, so no guitar for a week.  But when I return shall move to record loops and get going with this ... I think it is time ... sort of BC stage 9?  Whatever :)  Meanwhile, not playing for 8 days is going to be my longest gap since I started the BC on 16 Dec 2016  :'(

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2018, 12:00:49 pm »
More ... part 4.


It's time to get melodic and begin exploring Chet's 'scale tune'.

Chet demonstrated notes in the key of C available from fret 3 of the e string (note = G) descending to fret 3 of the A string (note = C).
Like this:


e || 0 -- 1 --    -- 3 -- ||
B || 0 -- 1 --    -- 3 -- ||
G || 0 --   -- 2  --   -- ||
D || 0 --   -- 2  -- 3 -- ||
A || --------------- 3 -- ||
E || -------------------- ||


Hopefully you know your note names on all strings to at least fret 3 so should realise that Chet (deliberately one must assume) omitted a few notes (those that are lower than the Root C note on the 5th string)

For completion here is the full set of notes in the C Major scale up to and including fret 3:


e || 0 -- 1 --    -- 3 -- ||
B || 0 -- 1 --    -- 3 -- ||
G || 0 --   -- 2  --   -- ||
D || 0 --   -- 2  -- 3 -- ||
A || 0 --   -- 2  -- 3 -- ||
E || 0 -- 1 --    -- 3 -- ||


For the first, simplest version of the scale tune, which Chet starts and then encourages his student to also play, he plays descending sequences comprising four groups of nine notes over the chord progression. It starts at the highest note that he has shown, the note G at the 3rd fret of the high e string. It goes like this:


G  F  E  D  C  B  A  G  F
   F  E  D  C  B  A  G  F  E
      E  D  C  B  A  G  F  E  D
         D  C  B  A  G  F  E  D  C


A simple stepped sequence of notes whose iterations always begin and end a note lower than the previous one.
So far so good.
And so mechanical / mathematical almost.
So how come it sounds sweet and musical?
Let's look at those same four groups of nine notes alongside the chord progression.

First, look at the 'scale tune' notes alongside the chords and the 1, 2, 3, 4 count for each bar (every note is played on a count).



    G F E D    C B A G     F   
    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4 
||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |


    F E D C     B A G F   E
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |


    E D C B     A G F E    D
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | Am / / /  | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |


    D C B A     G F E D   C
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||


Of course, all of the notes sound just fine, because all of the notes and all of the chords come from the same place - the C Major scale.
So, instead of having four groups of nine notes (=36) notes to perhaps confuse us, let's just focus on two at a time.

Look at the first sequence of nine notes.



    G F E D    C B A G     F   
    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4 
||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |

What is the first note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

What is the final note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?



Look at the second sequence of nine notes.


    F E D C     B A G F   E
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |


What is the first note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

What is the final note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?



Look at the third sequence of nine notes.


    E D C B     A G F E    D
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | Am / / /  | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |


What is the first note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

What is the final note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?



Look at the fourth sequence of nine notes.


    D C B A     G F E D   C
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||


What is the first note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

What is the final note?
What chord is it being played over?
Put the two answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

I hope you can answer these questions and are beginning to see connections between the underlying chords and the eight notes being examined.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2019, 10:04:58 pm by close2u »

Offline stitch101

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 4947
  • Good Vibes 174
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #32 on: February 17, 2018, 04:23:27 pm »
@ Close
David asked
Quote
And imaging the pattern in my mind's eye, it would it be the G shape in CAGED
You said
Quote
No

I'd like to know your reasoning on why he can't use the G shape scale. It would be in open position and right
under his fingers.

I don't want to hijack this thread because you're doing a fantastic job explaining what Chet is teaching but
it would be an injustice to David to thi k he can't use the G shape G scale whe playing Chet's lesson in G.

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #33 on: February 17, 2018, 05:55:03 pm »
@ stitch101

Thanks for following and asking a clarifying question.
The fact that you have done so means I wasn't clear enough so I'm happy to try it again.


You ask:
Quote from: stitch101
I'd like to know your reasoning on why he can't use the G shape scale. It would be in open position and right under his fingers.

I hope I can do your question justice.

David's full set of questions - which I edited in my first answer to him - were:

Quote from: DavidP
I could play the G maj scale with root note on 3rd fret with middle finger and rest of the notes on frets 2 3 4 5. I gather this would then be the scale in a particular position or pattern that has a specific number to reference it. And imagining the pattern in my mind's eye, it would it be the G shape in CAGED?

I was answering with a 'no' only to the very last part of David's questioning. That is to say, the G Major scale pattern he is imagining, one which spans from frets 2 to 5, is not the 'G shape in CAGED'.

So, just to clarify then ...
Quote from: DavidP
The chord progression could be described as I II V7 I VI II V7 I ... yes?  If so I could play it in G ... yes?  I could play the G maj scale ... ?

Yes.

Quote from: DavidP
... with root note on 3rd fret with middle finger and rest of the notes on frets 2 3 4 5 ... ?

Yes.

Quote from: DavidP
...  I gather this would then be the scale in a particular position or pattern that has a specific number to reference it ... ?

Yes.

Quote from: DavidP
And imagining the pattern in my mind's eye, it would it be the G shape in CAGED?

No.


That particular pattern - the first one you will be taught as and when you move to study the Major scale -  is an E-shape pattern in CAGED, not a G-shape.
It is pattern 1 when CAGED is altered to read as EDCAG - which matches the order they are taught in.

Heads-up ...
As I mentioned to David, as I extend this analysis in subsequent posts, I do intend moving on to exploring a chord progression parallel to Chet's in the key of G. And, of course, looking at playing melodic phrases over it with a G Major scale pattern that uses open strings and notes up to fret 3 only (not frets 2-5 as David is describing).

If you're already treading that path - fantastic! Go for it.

I'm going to continue mining this rich seam and squeezing a little more musical juice from the C Major fruit first.

Look at me - mixing my metaphors! Ha ha.
I'm so excited at how one seemingly simple section of a youtube video can contain so much of worth. Who would have thought that a few chords and a sequence of linear notes could yield such bounty!




@ stitch ... does that clear things up for you?

Offline stitch101

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 4947
  • Good Vibes 174
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #34 on: February 17, 2018, 06:25:02 pm »
I figured there was more to you answer. You usually give an explanation with your answers so just saying "No"
caught me off guard.
I'll butt out and let you continue. Great job breaking this lesson into bite size chunks. Keep up the good work.

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #35 on: February 17, 2018, 06:54:25 pm »
More ... part 5.

If you were finding the last section of part 4 difficult, not making connections between chords in the progression and notes in the melody, not seeing significant overlaps, then this might help.

Ideally you should have been reading the posts with guitar in hand, playing the chords, playing the melody over the chords, cross-referencing one to the other.
Maybe you have also been writing things down on paper to help with your thinking.

If you want to obtain the maximum learning and insight, and don't yet understand everything, then try interacting with the practical aspects of these posts before reading further.








Okay ... supporting material to help with the content of part 4.


Here is the 'scale tune' and the chord progression lined up once again - this time with the numbers of the count removed for easier reading.



     G F E D    C B A G    F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |


    F E D C      B A G F   E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |


    E D C B      A G F E    D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |


    D C B A      G F E D   C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||


I suggested that the focus be only on the first and last notes from each of the four groups of nine notes. So I am now going to temporarily delete all other notes.



     G                     F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |

    F                      E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |

    E                      D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |

    D                      C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||



Okay so far?

If so, then this next step should be straightforward.
For each chord in the progression, I am going to add its constituent notes under the chords.
So, you will see three rows.
The upper row will be the first and last notes of each of the four groups of nine notes.
The second row will be the bars with chords and the / markers representing the four beats per bar.
The bottom row will be the notes that make up each chord (see previous posts for these).



     G                     F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
     (C E G)               (D F A)

    F                      E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |
   (G B D F)               (C E G)

    E                      D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
   (A C E)                 (D F A)

    D                      C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||
  (G B D F)                (C E G)


I am hoping that there is now something so clear and obvious that you see it in an instant.

If not, I am going to put in a real give-away hint using bold / coloured font.

So, this is the same diagram as immediately above with certain notes emboldened and depicted in red.


     G                     F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
     (C E G)               (D F A)

    F                      E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |
   (G B D F)               (C E G)

    E                      D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
   (A C E)                 (D F A)

    D                      C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||
  (G B D F)                (C E G)



Okay?

Good.

Now, let's return to some questions previously asked, and add some more.

For each of the four groups of nine notes (remember, I have deleted all but the first and last in the diagrams above):

What is the first note?
What chord is it being played over?
What notes make up that chord?
Put the answers together - do you find any significant overlap?

What is the final note?
What chord is it being played over?
What notes make up that chord?
Put the answers together - do you find any significant overlap?




WOW.

WOW.

Just WOW.

For each of the four groups of nine notes, the first and the last note is ALWAYS a note in the underlying chord.

WOW.



This is the genius of Chet's lesson.
Without mentioning it, without adding in confusing segments of theory, and with seemingly no effort whatever, he has devised a masterpiece of guitar tuition.
A chord progression in the key of C.
An easily played set of notes that make up the C Major scale.
A descending set of notes from that scale that are no more than a simple linear sequence to play over the chords.
And hey presto - music, sweet and melodic music.

What he undoubtedly knows, and isn't making a fuss about, is that he is performing that 'magic trick' of targeting chord tones when playing his 'scale tune'.

Targeting chord tones.
It's just so, so simple.


I tip my hat to Chet in this.
Youtube and the interweb are full of videos by guitar gurus promising you 100% satisfaction in your guitar playing if you just target chord tones when you're playing a solo. Some are awful, some okay and some are good. I suggest that none does it so simply as Chet does here.

Offline batwoman

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1791
  • Good Vibes 117
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #36 on: February 18, 2018, 02:01:22 am »
To quote you Close ...

Wow
WOW
WOW, WOW, WOW

and again, I say THANKYOU.

Offline Matek

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 269
  • Good Vibes 7
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #37 on: February 18, 2018, 07:13:12 am »
Thanks for the lessons Close.
I will save this and go through it slowly

Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app


Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #38 on: February 18, 2018, 10:08:02 am »
Thanks for the thanks.

I hope that you are following along and maybe picking up something useful.

Please continue to comment, feedback, engage.

 :)

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #39 on: February 18, 2018, 11:18:24 am »
More ... part 6.

We have now made connections between the chords, the notes and the melody being played in 'scale tune'. At least the first part of the melody. Chet progresses to play additional parts and I have only analysed the very first part. I will linger a while longer on that first part before moving on.


Part 5 ended with the first / final notes of 'scale tune' being shown in red as 'chord tones'.
That is the start point for exploring here and doing so in a variety of ways.

First, I'm now going to put all the notes back in to the diagram and look to see if there are other chord tones that happen along the way.

Here is the 'scale tune' and the chord progression lined up once again with all of the four groups of nine notes shown.
All of the chord tones are emboldened and shown in red font.
You should by now be comfortable with the notes that make up each chord. I still include them in brackets under the diagram but revert to just presenting them in black font for clarity and to maintain focus on the notes from the 'scale tune' above the chords.



     G F E D    C B A G    F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
     (C E G)               (D F A)

    F E D C      B A G F   E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |
   (G B D F)               (C E G)

    E D C B      A G F E    D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
   (A C E)                 (D F A)

    D C B A      G F E D   C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||
  (G B D F)                (C E G)


The first thing to notice is that there are lots of scale tones. Lots and lots.
Do you remember mention being made of those stacked thirds when looking at chord construction?
I wonder if you can trace a link from there to here?



Second, I'm going to encourage you to use this as a start point to being creative and making up your own 'scale tunes'. So, I'm going to remove every note that is not a chord tone and replace it with a ?.
I suggest that you actually write out on paper your own scale tunes, literally write them out as pieces of music you have composed and will then play. You need to replace each ? with a note from the C Major scale, making sure it is a different note to the one Chet played. Do this in several different ways and when you play your compositions, make sure you use your ears carefully to listen for what works well

With the entire chord progression mapped out it looks like this:


     G ? E ?    C ? ? G    F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
     (C E G)               (D F A)

    F ? D ?      B ? G ?   E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |
   (G B D F)               (C E G)

    E ? C ?      A ? F ?    D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
   (A C E)                 (D F A)

    D ? B ?      G F ? D   C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||
  (G B D F)                (C E G)


You may find it easier to write as a simple list of notes something like this:


G  ?  E  ?  C  ?  ?  G  F   
   F  ?  D  ?  B  ?  G  ?  E
      E  ?  C  ?  A  ?  F  ?  D 
         D  ?  B  ?  G  F  ?  D  C

 
Here is the original set of 36 notes if you want to have them side by side as you compose your own variations.

G  F  E  D  C  B  A  G  F
   F  E  D  C  B  A  G  F  E
      E  D  C  B  A  G  F  E  D
         D  C  B  A  G  F  E  D  C


I have deliberately restricted the space that you are working in to just those notes that are not chord tones, which is just 16 out of 36. That is still a lot of creative space and I hope that you repeat the exercise, changing the notes each time. I'm hoping too that you started off by physically writing out the notes and then playing them along with the chord progression (you have recorded a backing track loop haven't you?). I'm also hoping that you very quickly go beyond the act of writing them down on paper to spontaneously playing your own notes based around all of those chord tones in an improvisational wonderland.
How is it sounding?
Are you making good music?
Are you using the Major scale to improvise, create, play melodic lead guitar?



Third, it is now time to enlarge the creative space, to have freedom to mix and blend yet more colours on your musical palette. So, let's go back to considering the diagram showing just the first and final notes of the 'scale tune' in red and let's replace all of the other notes with a ?.


     G ? ? ?    ? ? ? ?    F   
 ||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
     (C E G)               (D F A)

    F ? ? ?      ? ? ? ?   E
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |
   (G B D F)               (C E G)

    E ? ? ?      ? ? ? ?   D
 | Am / / /   | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |
   (A C E)                 (D F A)

    D ? ? ?      ? ? ? ?   C
 | G7 / / /   | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||
  (G B D F)                (C E G)

Again, you may find it easier to just write your notes out as a simple list.


G  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  F 
   F  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  E
      E  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  D 
         D  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  ?  C


The task now (should I say the fun now?) is to improvise, guided only by the security that every time you begin and end each of the four passages, you will be landing on a chord tone. Where you go as you make your musical journey of exploration around the C Major scale is up to you. You're starting from a safe place and returning to a safe place as you play your four groups of nine notes. Have fun.


 :)

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #40 on: February 18, 2018, 12:00:02 pm »
More ... part 7.

A short study around chord tones.

At the end of part 6 you were playing scale tunes where the first and final notes were the chord tones of Chet's original melody. These notes are played on the first beat, the count of 1, of a chord change.

In the progression, each chord lasts for two bars.
Each of the four groups contains nine notes.
So notes 1-4 are played over counts 1, 2, 3 and 4 of a chord the during the first of its two bars.
Notes 5-8 are played over counts 1, 2, 3, 4 of the same chord during its second bar.
Note 9 is played over count 1 of a new chord at the time of a chord change.
Then there is a rest during counts 2, 3, 4 and 1, 2, 3, 4 of that new chord.
As soon as the next chord change comes along, with a new count of 1, a new chord tone is played.

This is targeting the chord tones.
Consciously playing a note from the underlying chord when the chord change happens.

So notes 1 and 9, the first and final notes of each group of four, are examples of targeting the chord tones.

I also showed in part 6 that there are other chord tones being played throughout the progression. When chord tones are played during the progression, but not at the moment of a chord change, this can be described as outlining the chord tones, or outlining the chords.

So, we now have two simple aspects to using chord tones.
1] Playing a chord tone on beat 1 as the chord changes - targeting the chord tone in this way can help connect the lead melody with the movement of the chord progression.
2] Playing a chord tone at any point over a chord - outlining the chords helps to more strongly tie the melody to the chord progression.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 01:41:56 pm by close2u »

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #41 on: February 18, 2018, 03:29:40 pm »
More ... part 8.

At 2mins 22 secs in the video Chet invites his student to continue playing the four groups of nine notes (which is shown in the lower half of the video screen) and he then moves up a notch and starts to play something more elaborate (shown in the upper half of the video pane).

So what is Chet doing?

First, he has gone from playing quarter notes (4 per bar played on the count of 1, 2, 3, 4) to eighth notes (8 per bar played on the 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &).
Second, he has maintained the exact same notes as before played on the beats, but introduced something new played in between each of those, on the '&' each time.
So instead of four groups of nine notes he now has four groups of seventeen notes.

Let's look at that.
Here is the original section of the 'scale tune' as previously shown - with extra spacing between notes and between rows that will allow me to add in the extra notes that Chet is playing and to see what he is doing.

G   F   E   D   C   B   A   G   F

    F   E   D   C   B   A   G   F   E

        E   D   C   B   A   G   F   E   D

            D   C   B   A   G   F   E   D    C

In the next diagram I will add in Chet's extra notes on a row under each existing sequence, spaced in between the original notes.
The new notes will be in blue font.

G   F   E   D   C   B   A   G   F
  E   D   C   B   A   G   F   E
    F   E   D   C   B   A   G   F  E
      D   C   B   A   G   F   E   D
        E   D   C   B   A   G   F   E   D
          C   B   A   G   F   E   D   C
            D   C   B   A   G   F   E   D   C
              B   A   G   F   E   D   C   B

So to play what Chet is playing you need to play these notes from left to right, reading from two rows, playing black then blue, black then blue with black notes on the 1, 2, 3, 4 and blue notes on the '&'.

This new sequence of extra notes is a parallel set to the original, a sequence of notes from the C Major scale in descending order.
Also note that every move from a black note to the next blue note is a drop of a third (remember those stacked thirds from the chord construction?).
Chet is basically playing the C Major scale, starting on the note G, in descending thirds.
And because of the chord tone phenomenon it still sounds sweetly musical.

Does that make sense?

If not, maybe this will help.

Here is the C Major scale again:
C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C

Now here is the C Major scale in descending order:
C B A G F E D C B A G F E D C

Now here is the C Major scale in descending order starting at the note G (as Chet does)
and finishing at he note E which matches the lowest available E using the open 6th string on the guitar:
G F E D C B A G F E D C B A G F E


Now here is that same C Major scale with the addition of the notes Chet plays, shown in pairs of thirds.
These pairs are made up of a black note and a blue note side by side, left to right.

G F E D C B A G F E D C B A G F E
G   E
  F   D
    E   C
      D   B
        C   A
          B   G
            A   F
              G   E
                F   D
                  E   C
                    D   B
                      C

Note that I have simply rolled all of the notes, which overlap and double back on themselves in the four groups, into one long stream. This is only for the purpose of illustrating the descending pattern of thirds. Which I hope you can clearly see by referring to the C Major scale shown above them.

Here is a similar diagram but this time split in to the four groups of seventeen notes.

G   E
  F   D
    E   C
      D   B
        C   A
          B   G
            A   F
              G   E
                F

  F   D
    E   C
      D   B
        C   A
          B   G
            A   F
              G   E
                F   D
                  E

    E   C
      D   B
        C   A
          B   G
            A   F
              G   E
                F   D
                  E   C
                    D

      D   B
        C   A
          B   G
            A   F
              G   E
                F   D
                  E   C
                    D   B
                      C


If you play these notes, top-to-bottom, left-to-right, black-to-blue, then you will be playing Chet's second section of the 'scale tune'.
Does that make sense?



Next up will be the third and fourth sections, between 3mins 06 secs and 4mins 32 secs.
But that'll be easy.
He's just playing ascending rather than descending sequences.
No problems there.

Then I'll move on to the G Major scale possibilities.

Phew.


Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2018, 11:00:25 am »
More ... part 9.

Okay, it's time to conclude our study and exploration of Chet's 'scale tune'.

Note: I am not going to consider and analyse Chet's playing from the point where he starts to hold barre chord shapes and play artificial harmonics - that is not beginner stuff.
Plus, I can't play artificial harmonics myself so need to limit my analysis to what I do know!  :)


At 3mins 06 secs Chet changes playing direction and starts to play ascending sequences of notes. Four groups of nine notes at first, quarter notes, all played on the beat. Then four groups of seventeen notes, eighth notes, all played alternately on the beat and the &.

Basically, if you have followed and played, and explored so far then this next step will be an easy one. Chet has just inverted his sequences, with the starting note no longer be the note G but the note E.

Like this:


E F G A B C D E F
   D E F G A B C D E
      C D E F G A B C D
         B C D E F G A B C

Against the chord progression it looks like this:

    E F G A    B C D E     F
    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4 
||: C / / /  | C / / /  | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |

    D E F G     A B C D   E
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / |

    C D E F     G A B C   D
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | Am / / /  | Am / / / | Dm / / / | Dm / / / |

    B C D E     F G A B   C
    1 2 3 4     1 2 3 4   1 2 3 4    1 2 3 4
 | G7 / / /  | G7 / / / | C / / /  | C / / / :||


Notice that the final note in each group is exactly the same as the final notes for the descending sequences. And that the first and final notes can again be seen as 'targeting the chord tones'. So I have put these in red font again.


Then, in the next section, when he starts to play the eighth notes, he once again starts to play the scale in thirds, but ascending thirds.
Like this:


E   G
  F   A
    G   B
      A   C
        B   D
          C   E
            D   F
              E   G
                F

  D   F
    E   G
      F   A
        G   B
          A   C
            B   D
              C   E
                D   F
                  E

    C   E
      D   F
        E   G
          F   A
            G   B
              A   C
                B   D
                  C   E
                    D

      B   D
        C   E
          D   F
            E   G
              F   A
                G   B
                  A   C
                    B   D
                      C


If you play Chet's 'scale tune' you will be developing your ear and developing good muscle memory for the C Major scale in this open position.
That's great.
But it's not the end of it.
The rich learning will come if you take these ideas and modify them.
Create with them.
Take them apart and put them back together.
Really get inside the sounds and the possibilities of playing and experimenting with the C Major scale.
This is just a simple canvas with some feint outlining ready drawn - the chord progression and the targeted chord tones in red.
It is yours to add colour and detail and create your own 'work of art'.
Improvise.
Have fun.

Offline MrBumble

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 540
  • Good Vibes 18
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #43 on: February 19, 2018, 12:30:20 pm »
close2U

I've been following this thread with rapt attention. At the moment it's above my competence level but I know it will be really useful in the future - and to loads of other people too.

Perhaps it would be a good idea to make it sticky so that it can be found easily?
Guitars - Gretsch 5120, Ovation Celebrity, Revelation RJT60Q.
Pedals - TC Polytune 2, Mooer BluesCrab, Boss CE5 Chorus, Boss RC3 Looper, TC Flashback 2
Amplifiers - Fender Super Champ 25 SE, Laney A Fresco, Marshall G30R CD,

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11581
  • Good Vibes 445
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: Beginner guitar lesson with Chet Atkins
« Reply #44 on: February 19, 2018, 01:04:21 pm »
Thanks Mr B.
Any and all feedback is welcome so that I know if I'm being clear, my diagrams are clear, and I'm pitching it right.
You say it's a little beyond you just now?
You could try the chord progression (play it through a few times), the scale pattern and the simpler nine note sequences as a start.
 :)

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App