Author Topic: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24  (Read 1385 times)

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Offline srisitt

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Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« on: December 10, 2017, 10:29:02 pm »
Hi, new to the forum. I'm enjoying this book quite a bit but I'm confused over what I should be doing for the chord progression exercise on page 24.

Justin gives this example: "...I will run through the first example (I-VI-II-V) now. In the key of C the progression is C, Amin, Dmin and G." 

When I do this exercise, how am I meant to play the chords? In the open position? Do I only play root notes? Do I use the interval patterns I learned on the previous page to find the first and third degrees on the 5th and 6th strings, then find the last note on the 4th string on my own?

As you can see I'm very confused!! Thanks for any help!

Offline Omar

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2017, 09:03:59 pm »
Hi,

I’m right now looking at page 24. As you you see, there are 10 different chord progressions. Justin says, play each progression in different keys just to get used to these chords sound. So he means play the chord not the “I” of each chord.

Offline TB-AV

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2017, 01:04:06 am »
Play the chords anywhere you know how. If only Open, that's fine. If you know barre chords, do that too.

EX: I vi ii V

C= C Am Dm G(or G7 if you know it)

E= E Gm F#m B(or B7 if you know it)

Just play the chords. It's to help you recognize the chords in each key. You will notice each time the "song" sounds the same but simply pitched up or down.
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Offline srisitt

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2017, 01:02:23 am »
Thanks for the responses. I guess that confusion would then be in how I'm supposed to incorporate the interval diagrams on the previous page:


Offline TB-AV

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2017, 02:16:24 am »

Again it really doesn't matter. the point being pick a ROOT position. Then play all the chords fro that place.

So with Root on 5th fret A Major. You r Bm woul dbe on fret 7. You IV chord D woul dhave root on 5th string 5th fret. A SHAPE.
your V chord would be A SHAPE at 7th fret E Chord.. Your iii chord would be 4th fret A SHAPE minor chord.

IOW... when you see IV or V or ii or vi on those diagrams. That's where the ROOT note is for those chords.

R = 5th fret = A Chord  = E SHAPE
V = 7th fret =,a string = Root of E chord = A SHAPE

ii = E string = E SHAPE = B minor = 7th fret
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Offline TB-AV

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2017, 04:30:54 am »
Oh, and he does say that he is only giving the first two strings. so you have 4 strings left to put those interval relationships on.

At the end of the day, it's basically endless as to how you wish to see and play it. One point being... start to see relationships.

Unlike a piano, the guitar is more complex in the manner in which things connect. The piano repeats a very7 specific pattern in a linear fashion. The guitar does it 6 times linear then you have the 6 times going across the strings. It can get really confusing. So one thing you will probably always want to be able to do is paly chords.

It just so happens that 'location by chord' is one the easier methods to find your way around the guitar neck. No matter how many strings you use.

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Offline DarrellW

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2017, 05:50:02 am »
This is one of the things I like so much about guitar (and some other stringed instruments) the fact that the same chord can sound quite different depending on which inversion of it you use, there’s something magical about it 😉
My singing sucks so I’m learning Guitar and Ukulele, it’s fun 🌟

Offline srisitt

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Re: Common Chord Patterns Pg. 24
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2017, 09:26:44 pm »
Oh, and he does say that he is only giving the first two strings. so you have 4 strings left to put those interval relationships on.

At the end of the day, it's basically endless as to how you wish to see and play it. One point being... start to see relationships.

Unlike a piano, the guitar is more complex in the manner in which things connect. The piano repeats a very7 specific pattern in a linear fashion. The guitar does it 6 times linear then you have the 6 times going across the strings. It can get really confusing. So one thing you will probably always want to be able to do is paly chords.

It just so happens that 'location by chord' is one the easier methods to find your way around the guitar neck. No matter how many strings you use.

Ah, now I understand. Thank you.

 

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