Author Topic: My Power Pin 2.0 trial  (Read 295 times)

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Offline CT

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My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« on: November 12, 2017, 09:47:19 pm »
Thought it might make sense to start a new discussion about Power Pins 2.0. Turns out I'm a fairly heavy-handed acoustic player at times, I drive the strings pretty hard with a Dunlop 60mm Tortex pick, striking with a curved corner rather than the pointy end (I like the control and tone). I might also be a bit heavy-handed when I palm mute, sometimes a little like a karate chop, which I do a lot. The problem here is that I'm starting to see my bridge pins working their way up a bit and actually found a string dislodged from it's groove in the saddle. The guitar is an Epiphone EJ-200SCE. I have no issues at all with my Ovation Balladeer which doesn't have bridge pins, the strings pull straight through holes in the bridge, which is a superior design in my opinion (certainly more logical).

The EJ-200SCE is a new guitar that I like a lot, and my playing style is what it is for the most part. Tonal considerations and other Power Pin product claims aside, it seems like the Power Pins will solve a problem for me that can only get worse over time.

New strings and Power Pins are on the way via Amazon Prime and the trial will begin shortly. I'm interested in comments from folks using Power Pins or general comments on the subject. I will keep this thread updated on my trial if there is some interest.


Epiphone EJ-200SCE

My introduction post on the forum

“Although there is no progress without change, not all change is progress.”
--John Wooden     

Offline CT

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Re: My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2017, 02:54:08 am »
Looks like there's more curiosity than interest. The installation was easy and the guitar sounds and plays great. Seems like there's a bit more sustain. I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. :)

Offline DarrellW

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Re: My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 05:03:11 am »
Looks like there's more curiosity than interest. The installation was easy and the guitar sounds and plays great. Seems like there's a bit more sustain. I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming. :)
No, it's interesting - I though about trying them myself, do they come out easily for restringing?
Oh and for Semi's have a look at Gretsch and Ibanez, they are pretty good!
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Offline MrBumble

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Re: My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 08:34:26 am »

I'm interested in the physics of pins. From an engineering point of view I think that the idea of something which is an interference fit has basic flaws. I like the idea of strings fitting through the bridge - I have an Ovation too - and wonder if guitars with that system stay in tune for longer.

I'll be interested to see how you get on with the power pins.

Offline stitch101

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Re: My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2017, 04:34:22 pm »
@ CT.
If your bridge pins are coming out you are string your guitar wrong. The pins don't hold the strings in.
The bridge plate does. The pins hold the ball of the string against the bridge plate.
I also have an Ovation that I bought in 1979 still plays and sounds  great.

Offline CT

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Re: My Power Pin 2.0 trial
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2017, 05:01:22 pm »
DarrellW, the PP do not come out for restringing, they are a permanent fixture. The PP have a slot/groove that you pull the string through and the little "knuckle" on the end of the string seats into a pocket of sorts. Ultimately the bend from the bridge and up over the saddle is essentially the same as it was with the standard bridge pins. My one knock is that the PP are over priced ($50) for what amounts to a small packet of screws/hardware (but I knew that going in).

I've settled in nicely with my Gretsch G2622, and I'm very happy with the purchase. The streamliner series gets dissed on some of the Grestch boards from time to time, I get it, it's not a $4k white falcon (nothing else is)!

MrBumble, I don't ever anticipate taking the PP out unless something unforeseen happens. The ease alone of changing out strings is worth the price of admission.

stitch101, you may be on to something! This is a new guitar that had never had a string change. Normally I would have taken it in for a setup, but I found the guitar to be properly setup out of the box. Moving forward I'm not going to futz around with bridge pins. Just taking them out once was enough for me. :)

 

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