Author Topic: Choosing the right "lesson" path  (Read 885 times)

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Offline Yellowpinky

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2017, 07:22:38 pm »
1st part of quote fine ... 2nd part not really ... you do not need to read music notation at all to play guitar ... unless classical guitar is the direction you're heading.




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Offline Yellowpinky

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2017, 07:31:20 pm »
I wasn’t suggesting reading Music was necessary but more an option towards learning general music theory. It does however open opportunities to playing music not necessarily intended for guitar or to help pick out vocal / melody lines to play under chords. Probably for me the most important thing is to just keep picking the guitar up and experimenting


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Offline MikeSD

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #17 on: November 13, 2017, 10:07:16 pm »
There's a lot of value in music theory, but you need to look at the priorities objectively if you want to learn to play. Your approach is kind of like, you want to learn to drive, but you're starting with the development of the internal combustion engine and its relationship to drive shafts.

Not really. I'm not asking how to build a guitar.  It's more like wanting to learn to drive, without asking first what are the P, N, D, D2 for and just pushing buttons as I roll down the road. And oh by the way, what's that needle thing in front of the turney thing I'm holding onto.  ;)

The reason I want to know theory is that I'm more of an academic in most things I try. I like to learn the what and the why as much as the doing.  I actually would have preferred to learn the violin but I'm thinking my fingers might be a little too big for the violin.  So, I went with the guitar as a 2nd choice.  If I learn nothing more than playing scales and chords, I'll be happy. Everything else is gravy at 72 years of age.

Off-Topic: When I go to the doc, I don't just say, my head hurts, give me some pills. I ask the doc what is causing this. I actually told my doctor once, "I want to know as much as you about my condition."  The theory of medicine has helped me a lot in understanding what's going on with my body.
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Such time is better spent learning basic chords and picking up the concepts as you go. Practical application can help to make the theory more relatable.

Not really mutually exclusive, and in fact that's what I'm doing. I do practice chords, 5 to 10 min daily.  And scales a little less often. In between, I'm looking at theory.

Quote
Justin's course, including practical music theory, will tell you everything you NEED as a 1st year player.

And that's what I'm doing.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2017, 10:22:43 pm by MikeSD »

Offline Johan217

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2017, 07:59:56 am »
I would compare it with learning Latin, where you study the grammar but don't actually use the language in real life :)

I really recommend the BBC series by Howard Goodall How Music Works, The Story of Music and Big Bangs. You can find all episodes on YouTube. They offer a very accessible look into the basics of music and its development through history.

If I learn nothing more than playing scales and chords, I'll be happy. Everything else is gravy at 72 years of age.
Don't be so modest. With 3 chords or 5 notes you can play hundreds of songs and be the envy of many a teenager  ;D
Guitars: Chevy LP-C (1991), Squier VM Jaguar (2015)
Amp: Fender Mustang I v2 (2015)

Offline joueur de guitare

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2017, 08:37:11 am »


I really recommend the BBC series by Howard Goodall How Music Works, The Story of Music and Big Bangs. You can find all episodes on YouTube. They offer a very accessible look into the basics of music and its development through history.


The books that Goodall wrote to accompany two of the series - Big Bangs and The Story of Music, are really worth getting. Much more material in them.

John Powell's How Music Works is worth a read too.
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Offline Drubbing

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2017, 01:38:21 pm »
Not really. I'm not asking how to build a guitar.... 

You're not asking how to build a car either. But you want to know 'why everything is so' first, rather than getting on and making the noise the thing is built to make. If the instrument is just the means to an end, why bother with the instrument?

I don't believe learning theory ahead of learning to play will help you play any quicker, you'll just know more about how music works. Theory doesn't develop fie motor skills, develop a sense of rhythm and timing, or a ear for melody. These are the actual things that help you learn to play.

Like you, I ask a lot of my doctors as well, and my accountant. But I don't intend trying to be one in order to know how I'm doing.

Offline MelissaM

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #21 on: November 14, 2017, 04:53:23 pm »
Hey Mike,

I think I know where you’re coming from, as I also enjoy learning the theory behind playing. I figure it’ll help my playing in the long run, and give my brain something to work on while my fingers catch up! In the meantime, I find it fascinating.

I’ve been fortunate to find a private instructor who has a masters in music, so he’s more than happy to answer all my theory questions and give me things to work on theory-wise.

Prior to picking up the guitar, I started learning the bass. Bass is great for learning theory! Since you don’t have to make your fingers do chord shapes, it’s pretty easy to play arpeggios of the different chords. The bass is the E, A, D, and G strings tuned an octave lower, so the patterns and fretboard knowledge translates easily to the guitar. The bass is all about rhythm and harmony, so it’s a great way to learn musical timing and chord tones.

One of the online bass instructors that I really enjoy and get a lot from is Mark J. Smith of talkingbass.net. He has a bunch of great lesson material, and I think you might be particularly interested in his Music Theory for Bass lessons. As I said before, the bass knowledge translates well to the guitar. If you want to play along with Mark, you can use the top 4 strings of your guitar.

Here’s a link to his free lesson material:
https://www.talkingbass.net/lessonmap/

The music theory set of lessons is the third one down.

Enjoy!
-Melissa

How do I play this thing?

Offline caprica

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2017, 08:30:21 am »
Not really. I'm not asking how to build a guitar. 

I found learning how to set up a guitar really helpful.  Largely because it taught me when it was me or when it was the action making something difficult to play or the intonation making sound off.  If you get a chance have a look at Erlewine's "How to make your electric guitar play great".

The other thing worth understanding is how different players produce tones you hear in different recordings.  Gallagher's 'Guitar Tone' was really helpful here.  It unpacks how wood types effect tone, how tube types effect tone, etc.

The last thing worth looking at is the recording process.  Understanding how layers are used to build up pieces was really helpful to me as it helped me understand what is achievable on the guitar and what is post processed.  I can't recommend a book here, but getting a DAW and messing around with it really helped me.

Theory wise, I found Justin's Practical Music Theory and the chord construction guide to be a good start.  It is a bit CAGED centric and falls flat in some areas though (like arpeggios, modes, 3 nps scales, etc).  So complementing Justin's material is worth it. Frankly all the theory in the world won't be much help much without ear training and transcribing practice, because music is an aural thing.
 

Offline Drubbing

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2017, 08:55:18 am »
"wood types affecting guitar tone? Not unless it's an acoustic. The idea wood affects a solid bodied electric is all in the minds of the players that think it does.

People have made Perspex guitars that sound just like Strats and LPs. Tone is in the pickups and amps - and the technique of the people playing them.

Offline caprica

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Re: Choosing the right "lesson" path
« Reply #24 on: November 15, 2017, 10:05:33 am »
"wood types affecting guitar tone? Not unless it's an acoustic. The idea wood affects a solid bodied electric is all in the minds of the players that think it does.

People have made Perspex guitars that sound just like Strats and LPs. Tone is in the pickups and amps - and the technique of the people playing them.

The book pretty much agrees with you.

 

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