Author Topic: Practice schedules  (Read 752 times)

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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2017, 09:05:13 am »


Buy the BC book.

Follow the BC book.

Hold the belief that Justin may know more about structured learning than you do.

There are no shortcuts, doing unnecessary stuff won't make you better, quicker.

There is no belief he knows more than I do, just absolute cold hard facts he knows more than I do! Without question, so you are right there!! I'm trying to avoid the unnecessary hance this post. Though, I do feel that I need more time on a couple of things (such as the previously mentioned finger gym work) as I do feel this will help me improve.
Thanks for responding.

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Offline Johan217

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2017, 09:36:10 am »
It's good that you are aware of things you need to work on beyond what Justin suggests. But I think the finger gym is more of an intermediate exercise (it uses hammer ons and pull offs, which are introduced in the Intermediate Course). I probably would not use it as a warm up since I find it can easily tire me out for the remainder of the practice session. While you are still in the BC, you're better off doing the Basic Finger Workout (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-135-FingerWorkout.php) and Quality Notes (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-302-QualityNotes.php) along with the Finger Stretching exercise (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-101-FingerStretchExercise.php).

When it comes to ear training, and developing your musical skills in general, Finding Melodies (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-351-FindingMelodiesExercise.php) is absolutely essential throughout the BC and IM courses.

Use what you know of the pentatonic scale to make up variations of your own exercises, incorporating stretches, string skips and different rhythms. That will help you get over the automatism of playing the entire pattern up and down all the time.
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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2017, 09:46:49 am »
It's good that you are aware of things you need to work on beyond what Justin suggests. But I think the finger gym is more of an intermediate exercise (it uses hammer ons and pull offs, which are introduced in the Intermediate Course). I probably would not use it as a warm up since I find it can easily tire me out for the remainder of the practice session. While you are still in the BC, you're better of doing the Basic Finger Workout (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-135-FingerWorkout.php) and Quality Notes (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-302-QualityNotes.php) along with the Finger Stretching exercise (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-101-FingerStretchExercise.php).

When it comes to ear training, and developing your musical skills in general, Finding Melodies (https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TE-351-FindingMelodiesExercise.php) is absolutely essential throughout the BC and IM courses.

Use what you know of the pentatonic scale to make up variations of your own exercises, incorporating stretches, string skips and different rhythms. That will help you avoid the automatism of playing the entire pattern up and down all the time.
Thanks Johan, I really appreciate the time and thought you have put into this response, gives me quite a lot of food for thought...
Have a good one:)

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Offline Paulvm

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2017, 01:00:40 pm »
I am no expert at all but you say you mute the strings with the palm of your hand. To me it sounds more like a wrong hand and/or arm placement than dexterity in your fingers. As I say I am no expert but it is something you can look into


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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2017, 04:10:04 pm »
I am no expert at all but you say you mute the strings with the palm of your hand. To me it sounds more like a wrong hand and/or arm placement than dexterity in your fingers. As I say I am no expert but it is something you can look into


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It's possible but finding that sweet spot where it doesn't happen is by far and away the biggest issue for me right now

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Offline joueur de guitare

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2017, 04:43:54 pm »
It's possible but finding that sweet spot where it doesn't happen is by far and away the biggest issue for me right now

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You probably need to concentrate more on chord practice (strum/pick/strum), and developing muscle memory. Boring yes, but essential.
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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #21 on: July 17, 2017, 06:17:26 pm »
You probably need to concentrate more on chord practice (strum/pick/strum), and developing muscle memory. Boring yes, but essential.
I dont mind boring if it yields results

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Offline Tom2712

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #22 on: July 18, 2017, 11:53:44 am »
Like everyone says, follow Justin's schedule and be patient, learning the guitar is a tortoise and hare situation. Slow and steady gets you there faster. If you have completed your schedule for the day, then you can choose to do more if you like, but be honest with yourself, quality over quantity any day. If you have spare time, learn songs, the bottom line is that is your goal, to make music. Remember this, you are only competing with yourself, to make you a better player. There is always going to be someone better than you, just a fact. (I am an intermediate, playing for about 10 years).

Good luck!


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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #23 on: July 18, 2017, 01:30:29 pm »
Like everyone says, follow Justin's schedule and be patient, learning the guitar is a tortoise and hare situation. Slow and steady gets you there faster. If you have completed your schedule for the day, then you can choose to do more if you like, but be honest with yourself, quality over quantity any day. If you have spare time, learn songs, the bottom line is that is your goal, to make music. Remember this, you are only competing with yourself, to make you a better player. There is always going to be someone better than you, just a fact. (I am an intermediate, playing for about 10 years).

Good luck!


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Thanks Tom, there will always be people better than me (I'm a black belt martial artist and some of the stuff the much lower grades can do/teach me still astonishes me) But your words make absolute sense, I am slowly learning to calm myself down and realise it very much is the journey not the destination!

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Offline doggedwon

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2017, 02:15:12 pm »
Hey Sirloin,

Just a quick tip from another beginner.

You said several times your palm is muting the high E when you reach for the low E.  Could it be you are gripping the neck of your guitar?

Your thumb should be low enough on the back of the neck so that your hand comes around the front in a claw like fashion.  Your fingers curled and landing perpendicular to the strings.  Sometimes that means bringing your palm quite a bit forward, especially if you have short fingers like I do.

When you're first learning to fret notes and chords keep at least a pencil width between your palm and the neck of the guitar.  Sliding your palm forward, away from your body does the trick.  It'll feel really awkward at first if you're used to gripping already.  But move your fingers as slow as you have to to make sure your palm keeps that distance. Practice it snail slow to get it absolutely right and ingrain that muscle memory before you try to add any speed to your chord/note changes.

I also practice scales, even though I'm a beginner.  But I do it because my ultimate goal is to play fingerstyle.  I also had my open chord changes at or above 60/min before I added scales to my practice.

Just throwing some ideas your way.  I'm still a beginner so I can only share some of my personal struggles.

PS. Those chord changes really fell into place for me when I added a metronome to my song practice.

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Offline sirloin2984

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Re: Practice schedules
« Reply #25 on: July 18, 2017, 03:09:22 pm »
Hey Sirloin,

Just a quick tip from another beginner.

You said several times your palm is muting the high E when you reach for the low E.  Could it be you are gripping the neck of your guitar?

Your thumb should be low enough on the back of the neck so that your hand comes around the front in a claw like fashion.  Your fingers curled and landing perpendicular to the strings.  Sometimes that means bringing your palm quite a bit forward, especially if you have short fingers like I do.

When you're first learning to fret notes and chords keep at least a pencil width between your palm and the neck of the guitar.  Sliding your palm forward, away from your body does the trick.  It'll feel really awkward at first if you're used to gripping already.  But move your fingers as slow as you have to to make sure your palm keeps that distance. Practice it snail slow to get it absolutely right and ingrain that muscle memory before you try to add any speed to your chord/note changes.

I also practice scales, even though I'm a beginner.  But I do it because my ultimate goal is to play fingerstyle.  I also had my open chord changes at or above 60/min before I added scales to my practice.

Just throwing some ideas your way.  I'm still a beginner so I can only share some of my personal struggles.

PS. Those chord changes really fell into place for me when I added a metronome to my song practice.

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Many thanks for this, always appreciate advice from anyone and this could really help! Thanks again, I have a metronome so that'll be easy enough to sort.

Have a good one:)

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