Author Topic: A matter of sound  (Read 4070 times)

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Offline KasperFauerby

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2017, 11:49:45 am »
What I am now wondering is why you would play the part 4 times.  Why not play once and copy it in the DAW 3 times.  Then they'd be identical.  I'd see this as reasonable studio mixing work.  As opposed to trying to produce a piece that might be played live by a band with 2 guitar players, playing different parts ... like The Stones or Wishbone Ash and you want to recreate that sound?

The thing is, you don't want 4 identical parts - you want 4 almost identical parts ;)

If you copy a take 3 times, then you'll only run into phase issues. You would get a better result just turning up the volume of the single original track.

You double (or quad, or whatever) track parts to make them sound fatter - that actually requires tiny differences in the waveforms plus panning and (ideally) different amp/eq on each version.

If you don't have the time, or don't want to, perform the part multiple parts then there exist gear that can help. For example the TC Electronics pedal "Mimiq". Back in the day I believe the Beatles used some sort of tape based doubler machine.. they didn't perform the parts multiple times afaik. That particular effect is also attempted by a pedal maker - for example Strymons "Deco" pedal.

Offline KasperFauerby

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2017, 11:50:23 am »
Kasper, who is far more experienced than yours truly, explained it pretty well some time ago in this thread (check the "Rythm Sound" section of his post) ;)

Ha, post collision ;)

Offline KasperFauerby

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2017, 12:07:04 pm »
What exactly are the differences again in the two versions?

They sound wildly different, so I'm thinking it's not just some limiting and EQ that's going on in the "mastered" one? The "Faders only" track, is that without cab sim?

Offline Fox Cunning

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2017, 12:13:53 pm »
What exactly are the differences again in the two versions?

They sound wildly different, so I'm thinking it's not just some limiting and EQ that's going on in the "mastered" one? The "Faders only" track, is that without cab sim?
Exactly, no cab sim, no eq, no amp sim, in fact no plug-ins at all.
That is simply what came out of the audio interface and into the DAW, with volumes/pan adjusted.

And by the way, here is a mix where you can actually hear the drums: https://soundcloud.com/fox-cunning/sonic-matter-mix-2

Offline Cue Zephyr

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2017, 01:40:13 pm »
tl;dr

You'd be good with two tracks rather than four. using two tracks makes them more defined and less of a wash. Dial in different tones, use different chord voicings in different octaves or tunings and you'll probably get a bigger sound that way. I usually go crazy in this department where I play single note melodies (sometimes on differen tinstruments) left and right that harmonize when put together.
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Offline Majik

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2017, 01:43:25 pm »
I was thinking this too. 4 guitars may be too much.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX, Gibson SG Special P90
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Offline DavidP

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2017, 04:32:18 pm »
Kasper, who is far more experienced than yours truly, explained it pretty well some time ago in this thread (check the "Rythm Sound" section of his post) ;)
Thanks for pointing me to that one, Fox.  I joined the community in Jan/Feb this year so missed it.

Kasper, great post ... super educational, albeit that some of it beyond me (not least of which being the playing  :) )

Point re subtle differences make sense.  And that plus the inversely mirrored EQ moves is what creates enough difference on the left and right sides to create width.

Cheers
David

Offline DavidP

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2017, 04:34:19 pm »
The thing is, you don't want 4 identical parts - you want 4 almost identical parts ;)

If you copy a take 3 times, then you'll only run into phase issues. You would get a better result just turning up the volume of the single original track.

You double (or quad, or whatever) track parts to make them sound fatter - that actually requires tiny differences in the waveforms plus panning and (ideally) different amp/eq on each version.

If you don't have the time, or don't want to, perform the part multiple parts then there exist gear that can help. For example the TC Electronics pedal "Mimiq". Back in the day I believe the Beatles used some sort of tape based doubler machine.. they didn't perform the parts multiple times afaik. That particular effect is also attempted by a pedal maker - for example Strymons "Deco" pedal.

Got it.

Thanks Kasper!

Offline Cue Zephyr

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Re: A matter of sound
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2017, 09:36:01 pm »
Point re subtle differences make sense.  And that plus the inversely mirrored EQ moves is what creates enough difference on the left and right sides to create width.
You can take this to higher levels by using different guitars, amps (or channels), chords, playing style, tunings, effects and even instruments. It's a lot of fun to play around wi(d)th.

When requiring two guitar tracks I'll often track my Taylor SolidBody with mini-humbuckers on one side, and for the other side grab my PRS SE Torero with active EMG humbuckers in C# standard tuning. Super wide guitars! :D
Guitar, banjo, mandolin and piano, bass and percussion only when needed
Production and mixing

 

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