Author Topic: Master the major scale  (Read 1685 times)

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Offline lewisrobinson

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Master the major scale
« on: March 31, 2017, 08:54:22 pm »
Hey guys, hoping someone could just clear something up for me.

On the master the major scale pdf the shapes have different coloured pointers in the patterns and the one with E shape differs from the tab it shows below it, any help in explaining??

Offline Omar

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2017, 09:06:29 pm »
If you're talking about G scale in E shape, the notes in red are root notes (G). When playing a scale you start with G on 3rd fret thickest string (ascending). When you're decending you play Gb (F#) 2nd fret thickest string and end with same note you started with, which is G.

Edit: typos corrected.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2017, 10:23:30 pm by Omar »

Offline tobyjenner

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2017, 04:54:01 pm »
Lewis

Omar's right about the red dots with the R in them, they are the root notes of the scale. You'd play the scale from the lowest root all the way up and back down the scale shape as Omar says above.

What's probably on your mind is the other red dots, that appear in the MTMS pdf. These along with the root note give the chord tones. So if you just play the red notes (plain and root) and you're playing the E shaped pattern G scale with the root on the 3rd fret of the 6th string, you'd be picking the notes of the G major chord.

Look closely at the red dots. What shape do you see ? An E shaped barre chord at the 3rf fret. There you go G major barre chord. Same goes for the other shapes.

There a section in Lesson 2 - part 8 ? - where Justin cover this.

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Offline [email protected]

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2017, 10:26:28 pm »
Toby

I'm still confused on one item with regards to the red dots.  You referred to 'chord tones' as does Justin in the video.  Are the chord tones the 1 - 3 - 5 notes required to make up the chord?

thanks

Offline tobyjenner

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2017, 08:08:45 am »
Toby

I'm still confused on one item with regards to the red dots.  You referred to 'chord tones' as does Justin in the video.  Are the chord tones the 1 - 3 - 5 notes required to make up the chord?

thanks

Tony

Sorry we had some visitors so not been on the forum but yes. The red circle with the R would be the root note of the scale ie the Key and if you then played up the scale to the next red dot that work be the 3rd and the one after that the 5th. You'd then be at the start of the next octave signified by the next red dot with an R. So the process repeats. Hope that helps.

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Offline [email protected]

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2017, 09:21:33 am »
Hey Toby

Thanks for getting back to me and answering my question.  Every little piece keep falling in place and making more sense.

cheers

Tony

Offline [email protected]

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2017, 02:58:29 am »
Why is the B note on the G string marked as a chord tone (red) but the B note on the A string isn't?

Offline Omar

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2017, 06:44:48 am »
Why is the B note on the G string marked as a chord tone (red) but the B note on the A string isn't?

It's an E-shape scale; G major barre chord. B and D notes in red are 3rd and 5th of G scale. If you remove all black dots you'll get G major barre chord in E-shape.

Why is it called E-shape? Imagine a capo on 3rd fret, to get a G major chord, you'll fret 4th fret at 3rd string (B note), 5th fret at 5th string (D note) and 5th fret at 4th string (G root note). This is the shape of an E major open chord.

Check CAGED system for more: https://www.justinguitar.com/en/TB-030-CAGEDsystemVid.php

Offline DavidP

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2017, 04:20:23 pm »
Hey there, guys ... I'm going to jump in here but note that I am quote a novice and haven't looked at these lessons yet. So feel free to correct me where I go wrong.

If I were playing the major scale in G and starting at G root note at 6th string 3rd fret then I would play that note with my middle finger.  I'd hit the II note at the 5th fret on 6th string with pinkie and then the III note on the 5th string at the 2nd fret with my index finger.  And the scale diagram I have highlights that note as a note in the triad.

I am assuming the reason why perhaps not indicated as such as per the question is because the intent is to hold the G chord as an E-shape barre chord and just pick the individual I, III and V notes of the chord without lifting fingers of the left hand.  Does that sound reasonable?

Cheers
David

Offline Omar

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2017, 05:10:59 pm »
Hey there, guys ... I'm going to jump in here but note that I am quote a novice and haven't looked at these lessons yet. So feel free to correct me where I go wrong.

If I were playing the major scale in G and starting at G root note at 6th string 3rd fret then I would play that note with my middle finger.  I'd hit the II note at the 5th fret on 6th string with pinkie and then the III note on the 5th string at the 2nd fret with my index finger.  And the scale diagram I have highlights that note as a note in the triad.

I am assuming the reason why perhaps not indicated as such as per the question is because the intent is to hold the G chord as an E-shape barre chord and just pick the individual I, III and V notes of the chord without lifting fingers of the left hand.  Does that sound reasonable?

Cheers
David

If I understand you well, it's not about the shape of the barre chord. When you start playing the scale, you start with G root note at 6th string 3rd fret, although Gb is within the scale and its lower than G, 6th string 2nd fret. So when you go up the scale, you start with G at 6th, and when you go up the scale you play the same root note at 3rd fret 6th string, then Gb 2nd fret 6th string and then back to root note to end the scale. Anyway, you fret D at 5th fret and G at 5th fret with your pinkie.

Offline DavidP

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2017, 05:28:02 pm »
If I understand you well, it's not about the shape of the barre chord. When you start playing the scale, you start with G root note at 6th string 3rd fret, although Gb is within the scale and its lower than G, 6th string 2nd fret. So when you go up the scale, you start with G at 6th, and when you go up the scale you play the same root note at 3rd fret 6th string, then Gb 2nd fret 6th string and then back to root note to end the scale. Anyway, you fret D at 5th fret and G at 5th fret with your pinkie.
Thanks Omar

Suspect I am getting out of my depth now ... maybe I should just wait until I get there and study the lessons  :)

My understanding would be that Gb is not a not in G major scale.  Would it A at the 6th string 5th fret and then down to 2nd fret 5th string for the B, 3rd fret for C and 5th fret for the V, the D. 

We may be at cross purposes here ... and as likely as not, I am missing something ... all a bit above my paygrade as Toby would say ...

Cheers
David

Offline Omar

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Master the major scale
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2017, 05:34:47 pm »
My understanding would be that Gb is not a not in G major scale.  Would it A at the 6th string 5th fret and then down to 2nd fret 5th string for the B, 3rd fret for C and 5th fret for the V, the D.

You're welcome David

G major: G A B C D E F#/Gb G


Edit: one semi-tone / half-tone / fret down to "root note" is the 7th and "root note" is the octave.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2017, 06:22:40 pm by Omar »

Offline SiegeFrog

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2017, 07:02:44 pm »
To avoid confusion, the 7th degree of the G major scale should be referred to as F# not Gb. Within any key signature each letter can only appear once. If you have a G natural, you can't have a Gb.


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Offline tobyjenner

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2017, 07:54:40 pm »
Guys lets not get confused regarding finger numbers and interval numbers - unless you have 7 fingers but then I guess you'd have your own Youtube channel and be making a mint.

I was going to put some diagrams up but Photobucket seems to have a) lost my library and b) is blitzing me with ads !! And previous posted images have now disappeared from the forum eg this interval chart
https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=41864.0 So I now need to find another hosting site!

So for fingering of Major Scale Pattern 1 - E Shape - refer to IM-113 without a diagram fingering to interval relations are

6th string E - intervals 7 1 - 2 played with fingers index 2nd pinkie *start and end on the 1/root
5th string A - intervals 3 4 - 5 played with fingers index 2nd pinkie
4th string D - intervals 6 - 7 1 played with fingers index ring pinkie
3rd string G - intervals 2  - 3 4 played with fingers index ring pinkie
2nd string B - intervals 5 - 6 played with fingers 2nd pinkie
1st string e - intervals 7 1 - 2 played with fingers index 2nd pinkie

The - represent an unplayed or skipped fret ie 71 34  are next to each other 1- 2, 4 - 5, 6 - 1 are two frets apart.

So whilst playing up and down the scale Justin suggest you memorise which notes ie intervals are the major chord notes by saying "chord note" when you play them. So starting on the 6th string root- chord note - then up the scale to the 5th - chord note - up the scale to the root/1 of the next octave - chord note - up the scale to the 3rd - chord note - up the scale to the 5th - chord note - and up to the root/1 - chord note - then on to the 2nd (the end of that scale shape) on the e string. Then back down to the 7th on the E string wash rinse repeat - identify the 1 3 5 intevals of the major chord on the way down.
You'll note you're only identifying the notes of the E shaped barre chord, that's why the Position 1 scale is also referred to as the E shaped scale.

Same principle applied to the other 4 scale positions/shapes which are DCAG - look at the diagrams in the CAGED module for further info.

@Tony - back to my original response - its not quite right. Yes those red dots are the intervals/chord notes 1 3 5 but they are not necessarily in that order. In fact for the E shaped/position 1 scale the chord notes are played 1 5 1 3 5 1 - so 3 roots 2 5ths and 1 3rd. So in every major scale shape you can identify the chord notes by knowing how to find the intervals of the scale. If I had the diagram I posted the other day you can see there's a relative position which never changes (apart from 3rd to 2nd) ie the 5th is alway over the root and the 4th is always under it. The 3rd is always 1 down 1 fret back. Once you get this into your head you can find chords all over the place.

Anyway if I work out wtf has happened to Photbucket I'll try and get some diagrams up but in the mean time If Stitch reads this, could I ask if he could drop in those fretjam pics as they make all this so much easier than words.

Ok practice time gone on this but I hope something make sense to someone.................... 8)
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Offline Omar

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Re: Master the major scale
« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2017, 07:55:11 pm »
To avoid confusion, the 7th degree of the G major scale should be referred to as F# not Gb. Within any key signature each letter can only appear once. If you have a G natural, you can't have a Gb.


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Makes sense. Thanks for the clarification 😊

 

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