Author Topic: Headphones for beginner home recording  (Read 636 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline batwoman

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 339
  • Good Vibes 24
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2017, 02:26:51 am »
I think good phones are wasted if only used for phone and laptops, which have limited output quality. Good phones can't put in SQ that isn't there. For these devices, I wouldn't spend more than $50.

This budget, up to about $100 is realm of products where you don't need to be concerned about impedance and headphone amps.

Really good point Drubbing, I was wondering about that. Thanks very much and a good vibe to you.

Offline Scooter Trash

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3006
  • Good Vibes 80
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2017, 06:12:35 am »
where you don't need to be concerned about impedance and headphone amps.

The impedance is actually very important. Any device that can drive headphones is gong to have a headphone amplifier in it. Some provide more voltage, some provide more current. If you're just going going to be using the phones with an iPhone.. low impedance headphones would be advisable. Somewhere around 32 Ohms would probably be fine. If you have an interface with a headphone amp that's designed for higher impedance headphones, higher impedance headphones might be better. If you're going to buy new headphones, and only plan to use them with a mobile device, don't buy high impedance headphones.

If you want to step up to a higher quality low-impedance headphone for tracking and listening, the Sony MDR-V6s are nice. MDR-7506s are nice too, and they're not too expensive. I've had mine for years.. And you can get the SonarWorks plugin for them if you decide to use them for mixing.



I dream of a better tomorrow where chickens can cross roads without their motives being questioned.

Offline Drubbing

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2883
  • Good Vibes 90
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2017, 06:29:06 am »
I'm well aware of the impedance angle, Scooter. I have 4 pairs of phones from 32-400ohm, A DAC and a couple of head amps.

The point was, that $50 or any product that is marketed for phones and laptops is not going to need any extra gear. they're plug n play, the impedance is already at a level suited to that purpose.

Offline Scooter Trash

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3006
  • Good Vibes 80
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2017, 06:37:47 am »
The point was, that $50 or any product that is marketed for phones and laptops is not going to need any extra gear. they're plug n play, the impedance is already at a level suited to that purpose.

... and the point I was trying to make was that the 250 Ohm headphones that were recommended earlier wouldn't be suitable for a mobile device.

The Sony headphones that I recommended are both 24 Ohms (they'll work well with mobile devices) and are found in many studios (for tracking) and in audio and video production. They're lightweight and can be purchased for under $100.00. You can also buy replacement foam earpads for them when they wear out .. so they'll last forever.  Good investment IMHO..

I dream of a better tomorrow where chickens can cross roads without their motives being questioned.

Offline J.W.C.

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 449
  • Good Vibes 19
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2017, 10:18:20 am »
When you decide on what headphones you want, you might consider buying them in the SonarWorks calibration package. They create a calibration curve for the specific headphone and you can drop the plugin on the master bus of your DAW.  http://www.sonarworks.com/headphones


Hey, cool, thanks for that link!

Offline Scooter Trash

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3006
  • Good Vibes 80
Re: Headphones for beginner home recording
« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2017, 06:11:48 am »
Hey, cool, thanks for that link!

You might take a look at Waves Nx too.. You can use it after SonarWorks at the end of your master bus chain to create a fairly realistic monitoring environment along with the flatter frequency curve. Just be sure to disable the plugins when you render your mix.
I dream of a better tomorrow where chickens can cross roads without their motives being questioned.

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App