Author Topic: QA-002 • How To Use A Capo To Change The Key To Best Suit Your Voice  (Read 4484 times)

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Offline SFDonovan

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Re: QA-002 • How To Use A Capo To Change The Key To Best Suit Your Voice
« Reply #15 on: December 15, 2015, 05:46:56 pm »
" I couldn't figure out why moving the capo up was going to help him sing it lower. Then someone pointed out that he would sing an octave lower the guitar. Hence the wheel, not the ladder."

I think this is why I became confused when I saw a version of Southern Cross by Crosby Still & Nash that played it in G rather than A with a capo at II.  I was like "Doesn't a capo at the 2nd fret raises it up?"

So instead of

Got outta (A) town, on a (G) boat, to the southern (D) islands

its...

Got outta (G) town, on a (F) boat, to the southern (C) islands

But the capo still allows you to sing it in A but an octave lower?  This gets confusing.
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Offline justinguitar

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Re: QA-002 • How To Use A Capo To Change The Key To Best Suit Your Voice
« Reply #16 on: December 15, 2015, 05:49:46 pm »
Hence the wheel, not the ladder.

Nice quote :) might steal that! ;)
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Offline mmmbert

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Re: QA-002 • How To Use A Capo To Change The Key To Best Suit Your Voice
« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2015, 01:13:44 am »

I think this is why I became confused when I saw a version of Southern Cross by Crosby Still & Nash that played it in G rather than A with a capo at II.  I was like "Doesn't a capo at the 2nd fret raises it up?"

So instead of

Got outta (A) town, on a (G) boat, to the southern (D) islands

its...

Got outta (G) town, on a (F) boat, to the southern (C) islands

But the capo still allows you to sing it in A but an octave lower?  This gets confusing.

If I understand what you said, I don't think that's it.

Don't think of chords as shapes but instead as groups of notes.  So putting the capo on the second fret and playing a G chord shape makes the notes played the notes of an A chord. Think about it. In an open G chord, from the thickest to thinnest strings you play GBDGBG (in the 3 finger version). Putting the capo on 2 and moving everything up two frets, they become AC#EAC#A, which is an A chord. Same for the F and C, they become G and D. So in your example, without the capo it is A G D, and with it is also A G D. So a person would have to sing both in the same key. I am not an expert on keys, but I think it is D (because it has the I IV and V chords of the key of D).

Now if you were to capo on the second and play the original A G D, the chords that are actually played  are B A E and they key is E. That is how you change key.

The part about singing an octave lower, I think is something like this. Say some has a naturally low singing voice and he wants to use open shapes to sing with, say the A D E shapes, but his voice is still too low, he is singing in F lower than the A. He could put the capo on the 8th fret (4 frets back from the 12th, which is the octave, 4 frets equals 2 whole steps which takes you from A to G to F). Then when you play the A shape it is an F chord, which is they correct key an octave higher.




 

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