Author Topic: Adding all the other instruments to a song  (Read 1625 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hollywood

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1734
  • Good Vibes 41
    • Official Website
Adding all the other instruments to a song
« on: April 28, 2015, 12:57:39 am »

EDIT: Actually, I think I'm just going to do these first songs acoustic, so it's just vocals, acoustic rhythm, acoustic lead riffs, and a drum track, maybe.  I guess I'm fine for now.




This might sound like a silly question.  I was trying to record a rough demo of one of the songs I wrote today, and I realized that I'm not really sure how to write the other parts beyond the rhythm guitar, vocals and lead riffs.

FOr example, listening closely to "Storyline" by Hunter Hayes (a song that's very similar to where I want to take my song, so I'm trying to use it as a template, for lack of a better word), I hear stuff like this, changing throughout the song:

Left ear:
Maracas/tamborine?
Other lead guitar intro riff
Acoustic guitar
Different lead riff
Different lead riff
Mando?
Harmonies

Right ear:
Electric guitar intro riff
Mandolin
Little guitar riffs in background
Part of another guitar riff
Bass
Some other riff
Harmonies
Other mando

Both ears:
Vocals
Drums
Another background riff
Another riff

I realize that is a professionally recorded song with a much more experienced musician than me.  But my point is, there's a bunch of different little riffs and pieces played at different points throughout the song that combine and flow really well.   I want my song to sound good - I want it to be good enough quality that people would actually buy it - but.... my inexperience is glaring in my face.  Obviously this is all new and I don't expect to learn it all overnight.

I was thinking maybe it would help if I could find a local band who would let me sit in on a writing or recording session, but I'm not sure how easy that would be to even find.  I'd like to have it done by May 24th for a project a friend of mine is doing that I'd like it to be included in.  Not required, but I'd really love it...
« Last Edit: April 28, 2015, 02:02:36 am by Hollywood »
Frontwoman of folk-rock band Lighting Matches
www.LightingMatches.weebly.com
www.Facebook.com/LightingMatchesMusic

Debut solo EP "Destination Sunday" (Rachel White)

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 15010
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Adding all the other instruments to a song
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2015, 03:28:28 am »
Set aside 7 hours to watch this....




then 7 more to watch this...




What you describe is arranging, in a word. Some people can do it in their head. Most can't.

It's the art of taking all the parts and making them become a song. Nothing unnecessary and everything contributing. Everything important and part of the whole.

I doubt very seriously if that Hayes guy does the arranging. Probably his producer and the musicians he hires.

Gone

Offline Hollywood

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1734
  • Good Vibes 41
    • Official Website
Re: Adding all the other instruments to a song
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2015, 03:39:40 am »
Thanks TB, I don't have 14 hours to kill so I'll skim the videos. ;)

I doubt very seriously if that Hayes guy does the arranging. Probably his producer and the musicians he hires.

Actually, he probably does.  He played every instrument (30+) on every song of his first professional record, and he's been performing professionally since he was 4 - now 23.  He's ridiculously amazing. 

But anyway, I think I'll just do my stuff acoustic for now and work in other instruments as I can.  At least that way I can get something going on my own.
Frontwoman of folk-rock band Lighting Matches
www.LightingMatches.weebly.com
www.Facebook.com/LightingMatchesMusic

Debut solo EP "Destination Sunday" (Rachel White)

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 15010
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Adding all the other instruments to a song
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2015, 04:16:58 am »
Oh, he might, I forgot he was that child prodigy type. He still has a co-producer that is no slouch either. As well as the musicians... So basically think of all those musical brains trying to make everything just right so that each little piece gets heard. Like when you see a score for an orchestra.

Watch vid in this link ... https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=35852.0

Try to watch the vertical. Imagine two posts so you only see one bar wide at a time. IOW, don't just stare at the whole thing going by.

Look at one bar of vertical at a time. Notice how in that sense a lot of the time not much happens per instrument OR when more happens sometimes two or three instruments are playing the exact same timing and maybe even notes so they sound as one.   Just keep trying to scan your eyes up and down inside one bar at a time and notice it's not just each instrument playing whatever they might feel. It's a very organized affair. sounds, notes, durations..... and then on top of all that the inflections of emotion.

...and some of those people are so good they can just think well if this is happening here then if I introduce a certain instrument it will have to do X and also another instrument may have to drop out.

It's a deep affair.

---

Just put the videos on when you are doing something else... when something interesting starts happening just watch. the Weathervane stuff that is...








Gone

Offline lunarscope

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 243
  • Good Vibes 11
  • So many positive waves - maybe we can't lose !
Re: Adding all the other instruments to a song
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2015, 08:45:34 am »
Hollywood, do you really need all this complication at this stage in your musical career ?
You sound good with just guitar and vocal - why not concentrate on writing and performing 'simple' songs ?
From your other posts you seem to be over-thinking and worrying about a lot of things.
You don't have to be able to do everything yourself and produce a broadcast quality record. For your purposes I'm sure any half-decent records company representative would recognise potential and what improvements/polishing are required. Even a musical genius like Kate Bush had Dave Gilmour to help her out when she first started recording.
Guitars: Ibanez TCM50E Talman; Cort Z42 Zenon; Squier Stratocaster.
Gear: Fender Mustang I v2; Kustom KLA10.
Road case: https://justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=36565.0
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/lunarscope

Offline LBro

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2400
  • Good Vibes 71
  • Well I am working on it.
    • YouTube offerings
Re: Adding all the other instruments to a song
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2015, 07:24:35 am »
Hollywood, do you really need all this complication at this stage in your musical career ?
You sound good with just guitar and vocal - why not concentrate on writing and performing 'simple' songs ?
From your other posts you seem to be over-thinking and worrying about a lot of things.
You don't have to be able to do everything yourself and produce a broadcast quality record. For your purposes I'm sure any half-decent records company representative would recognise potential and what improvements/polishing are required. Even a musical genius like Kate Bush had Dave Gilmour to help her out when she first started recording.

This post encompass a lot of what I was thinking. You can run yourself ragged trying to take it all in at once. Hollywood you have a lot of time to perfect your craft and take it as it comes. It is good you are eager to learn but at the same time, what about focus? By that I mean focus on identifying what is the most important things to tackle and go after those items. Once you get that down you can move onto other aspects. As an example you have asked a few times for folks to lay down a drum track for your song(s). They have suggested how to go about that and I am not sure if you have picked up on that. To me it is not a simple thing to add a drum track to a song pretty much after the fact. You have not stated if you have played the song to a metronome/click track or not. To do drums it would still be best to lay those down first. If not, a metronome or click track is mandatory. But better yet think of it as a collaboration where you work together with the drums provider up front to come up with something that fits well with the song. Drums may not be that important to you, but if they are, then again focus on that for a bit and I think it will add a lot to your songs. You will learn as well from the person you collaborate with and that is a good thing in advancing your craft.

You might want to talk more with Marcus... If I have it right he started here a few years ago and is ultra serious about his music and band. He is doing very well in his craft and likely could share some good tips with you.

Best of luck to you in what you are pursuing,
LB

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App