Author Topic: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic  (Read 29816 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #75 on: February 14, 2014, 01:45:46 am »

Are you guys saying I -should- be able to build a NAS(file storage for all my junk basically, runs some sort of batch files and looks at my desktop and sees the new files I have made for the day and backs them up to drive on NAS... perhaps through some naming convention I use)  IOW... let's say on my desktop one day I get an email with a schematic from someone and I print it to pdf on to my desktop. Maybe I prefix it El_flt for Electronics - Filters .... and somewhere on the NAS I have a drive or partition with a folder for Electronics/Schematics/Filters/ it will stick it in there and do that with all my files.... Then I will want perhaps a mirror updated or maybe I will simply run Acronis or whatever... but basically I want to do a very little work in my daily routine and simply by using a naming convention { which maybe could even be stripped off once transfered to NAS } ... let the NAS keep everything sorted and backed up.

Ermm, sorta...

Bear in mind a random network device, like a NAS, doesn't know what you have on your PC by default. The normal way you use a NAS is to have it appear as a network drive that you can put stuff on. If you want to do backups, you need to run a backup program on your PC that copies stuff from your local hard drive to the NAS. The NAS itself won't do it without some software on your PC.

For files you put on the NAS though, you can potentially do some cool stuff. Yes you could have it look through your files and sort them in the way you want (assuming you can write a script to do it).

For instance, on my NAS I store all my ripped CDs. I have a small script set up which runs once a day and which automatically creates a number of playlists which contain the latest added tracks by day, week, and month.

Quote
Also am I even close in that all that file sorting stuff above people might use a prog named BASH? Seems it may be something like writing batch files but better?

I went to the book store yesterday and just quickly thumbed through a bunch of magazines and books. Didn't read all of anything but saw a few things that sounded like what i was wanting and they mentioned some of these things... like that BASH for instance...

Bash is like command.exe, but a thousand times more powerful. Bash is actually an enhanced version of "sh" which is the standard Unix/Linux command line "shell", often known as the "Bourne shell" (named after the guy who first wrote it). There are other "shells" available including csh, ksh, and zsh which have different syntaxes but which are all extremely powerful.

BASH stands for "Bourne Again SHell" and is a play on words. For most scripting purposes it can be considered identical to the original "sh". Most of the enhancements are related to the interactive interface.

So, to do this you would need to learn how to program in "sh", known more commonly as "shell scripting".

A large part of the power of shell scripting is the ability to pipe outputs of programs to the inputs of others (you can do the same in Windows command line, but not nearly as flexibly), and the huge number of commonly supplied utilities which you can join together to do clever things.

Linux System admins love shell scripting as you can use it to automate most of the common system admin tasks. The best system admins are both very smart, and very lazy. They prefer to drink coffee and play computer games instead of working, but they also love solving problems and won't shirk their responsibilities. Give someone like this a network of Linux servers to look after and they will have it locked down, and operating like a finely oiled machine within a few weeks and will end up playing Halo or Minecraft most of the day. And the main tool they will use is shell scripting.

You don't have to learn much shell scripting to use Linux these days (although a handful of commands can be quite useful), but if you do want to do something like the things you have described, there's a good chance you can do it with a script. You can even build basic interactive GUI apps in shell.

And if you find something you can't do in shell, it's actually a fairly short step from shell scripting to Python or Perl.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #76 on: February 14, 2014, 02:09:29 am »
Ah... ok.... I was thinking to have the Pi do the backups and copies. running from on the Pi. I do realize it would have to be written, and I would probably have to get some help but really all I want is copies basically.

When I mentioned Acronis, I don;t expect the Pi to get involved in that...

But are you saying if I run a NAS + ( or ) RaspBMC that running copy/backup scripts is just not going to work.

Maybe sort of like if I was using Sony Vegas to render a video project and I asked could I also have Excel do some calculations a book keeping chores.... it might work but it's probably not a great idea.

But then again... I would only want the copy/backup stuff running in the middle of the night.... but maybe the media server would be downloading a movie or something???

Are you saying it's technically possible but I'm trying to do to much at once on a limited computer OR ,, yes it would work fine.. but I need to get the script written on my own first and that going to be my true hurdle.

This is the part that's throwing me.....
Quote
If you want to do backups, you need to run a backup program on your PC that copies stuff from your local hard drive to the NAS. The NAS itself won't do it without some software on your PC.

I was kind of envisioning this...

Pi - Running Linux which can do many things.
----- Pi is running a NAS as one of many things.. but NAS has not consumed the entire resources ( but maybe I'm wrong about that ).
---- Pi is available to do other things... like run a little prog that looks at my computer .... oh... and I should say... I could put all the files from my desktop into a 'share'. IOW, it won't need access to my entire pc ... ok so the Pi doing other things... and now it simply runs that copy/sort deal either upon co0mmand or at 3AM or similar.

I can't figure the "needs to be running on my PC" part.....
Gone

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #77 on: February 14, 2014, 02:24:48 am »
I was kind of envisioning this...

Pi - Running Linux which can do many things.
----- Pi is running a NAS as one of many things.. but NAS has not consumed the entire resources ( but maybe I'm wrong about that ).
---- Pi is available to do other things... like run a little prog that looks at my computer .... oh... and I should say... I could put all the files from my desktop into a 'share'. IOW, it won't need access to my entire pc ... ok so the Pi doing other things... and now it simply runs that copy/sort deal either upon co0mmand or at 3AM or similar.

I can't figure the "needs to be running on my PC" part.....

Yes, that would work too. The main thing is that "by default" the Pi cannot see the files on your computer. You would have to do something to make that happen. Running a backup program (like Acronis) on your PC is one way. There's no obvious reason why a NAS cannot be the target for that backup.

Sharing the PC folder/drive so that the Pi can see it is another. You would need to make sure your PC didn't suspend.

The "run at 3am" thing is called cron

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #78 on: February 14, 2014, 02:58:06 am »
Ok, sounds good. I ordered a Pi today. I was going to get a book but apparently that 8 in 1 for Dummies has a 2014 version coming out in June... So I will hold out for that.

That's true... just because I have the Pi,,, doesn't mean that perhaps Acronic should do things locally and then let the Pi do things local to it... once it's put in place..... probably a lot less work for me too.

I've got rip all my CDs as well....  :( I had a lot of them done but ripped them to wav and didn't get all the proper data so they couldn't be cataloged. I had some guys try to help me use a couple other progs to read what i had and go back and match songs to albums and pull data bu tit really didn't work.

I've forgotten now where they were... it was one of two progs and one had monkey in the name... but i need a CD database program too.... I don't want to screw that up again.

I'm going FLAC this time and make damn sure I get all the support data I'm supposed to have. come to think of it.... I might need a windows and a Linux program?? Yikes... I just thought of that.... I think maybe those progs were cross platform. I need to look them up again.
Gone

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #79 on: February 14, 2014, 05:46:13 am »
Dan... this guy has settings and things to speed things up that might cure your buffering.... maybe you already know it... Takes him to about 3:00 to get going.... but from there he talks about some interesting things..... I suppose anyway... at this point it's all interesting to me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V6cZ9p045w
Gone

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #80 on: February 14, 2014, 01:44:52 pm »
I've got rip all my CDs as well....  :( I had a lot of them done but ripped them to wav and didn't get all the proper data so they couldn't be cataloged. I had some guys try to help me use a couple other progs to read what i had and go back and match songs to albums and pull data bu tit really didn't work.

I've forgotten now where they were... it was one of two progs and one had monkey in the name... but i need a CD database program too.... I don't want to screw that up again.

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Quote
I'm going FLAC this time and make damn sure I get all the support data I'm supposed to have. come to think of it.... I might need a windows and a Linux program?? Yikes... I just thought of that.... I think maybe those progs were cross platform. I need to look them up again.

FLAC is a great choice.

As an aside, it amazes me how many people think that WAV is somehow audibly better than FLAC. I've heard people claim it must sound better because it's the same format as on the CD. There are two false assumptions in that claim.

It sounds like you used MediaMonkey, which is a well regarded app for ripping, you just chose the wrong format. Most apps will do a reasonable job of auto tagging music files and some even fetch and embed album art.

For linux there's a load of choice for rippers. I like Kaudiocreator because it is simple and configurable. Also k3b which is one of the best general CD burner/copier/rippers going. Bother of these are pure rippers: neither is a "music manager". In other words neither will create a local database. However, if you get the rips right (with the tagged information) you can point any decent music manager at it and it will build a local database from the tags.

It's worth saying that there is no standard for music management databases: every one has it's own format/schema. Music management apps also tend to apply any edits they may only to their local database version, not back to the tags on the original file. Which means if you make changes in one app they probably won't show up in another app.

In my view it is important to keep the tags on the music files as the "master" information source, as this gives you the most flexibility and long-term data preservation. I think MediaMonkey has good tag management capabilities.

A good tag management app on Linux is EasyTag

There's a number of good desktop music management/player apps on Linux including Banshee, Amarok and Rhythmbox. There's also a whole bunch of command line and streaming based music players.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #81 on: February 14, 2014, 02:19:24 pm »

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Go ahead,,,, rub it in.. I deserve it...  :'(    ---- Yeah,,,, I learned that one the hard way... Oh well,,, it was only 135 gigs.......
FLAC is a great choice.

As an aside, it amazes me how many people think that WAV is somehow audibly better than FLAC. I've heard people claim it must sound better because it's the same format as on the CD. There are two false assumptions in that claim.

I honestly can't remember why I used wav... I think it had something to do with having them in DAW format or something..... at any rate.... another project I should have run through on paper a few more times....
It sounds like you used MediaMonkey, which is a well regarded app for ripping, you just chose the wrong format. Most apps will do a reasonable job of auto tagging music files and some even fetch and embed album art.

For linux there's a load of choice for rippers. I like Kaudiocreator because it is simple and configurable. Also k3b which is one of the best general CD burner/copier/rippers going. Bother of these are pure rippers: neither is a "music manager". In other words neither will create a local database. However, if you get the rips right (with the tagged information) you can point any decent music manager at it and it will build a local database from the tags.


I -think- at the time... I simply had no idea about the manager aspects nor tags and I'm still not clear on the tag part. So yeah it turned into a real .... welll... you know the term...

It's worth saying that there is no standard for music management databases: every one has it's own format/schema. Music management apps also tend to apply any edits they may only to their local database version, not back to the tags on the original file. Which means if you make changes in one app they probably won't show up in another app.

In my view it is important to keep the tags on the music files as the "master" information source, as this gives you the most flexibility and long-term data preservation. I think MediaMonkey has good tag management capabilities.

A good tag management app on Linux is EasyTag

There's a number of good desktop music management/player apps on Linux including Banshee, Amarok and Rhythmbox. There's also a whole bunch of command line and streaming based music players.

Cheers,

Keith

I think that's my problem right now... for instance on windows everyone says use EAC which is what I used before because it has great error correction. BUT... I have no idea what tags I need or how I tell if I have them. I know there is ID3 for mp3 but I don;t know if I see that with a FLAC rip or what... Yes it was M-Monkey...

My files just say . Take Me to the River.wav.... But if someone else did it, it might say...

01 Take Me to The River - then a string Title, artist, album, ext...

I mean I can see it looks different but I still don't know if I have all the data I need. The last thing I am worried about is storage space so I want all the tags or what ever I can get.

I see what you mean about managers now and having the "master" but I still don;t know if masters are complete masters. Obviously, I never knew what I didn't know..... Now, I know I don't know what I'm doing. Once I cure that, I can re-do it all. But I still need to figure this 'tag' deal out.

I would rather do this in Windows because I can't get a Linux box running just yet... although I have a near complete PC over here, I probably should get running, It's a lot of money sitting in the floor doing nothing..... As a P4 that would probably be ideal for an all round Linux box.

So have you got something maybe you can post a screen shot of just what the heck 'tags' are so I can see them all and which ones do what? Is there a list somewhere?
Gone

Offline Tim Mason

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 566
  • Good Vibes 15
  • Started learning in September 2013
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #82 on: February 14, 2014, 02:51:32 pm »
Tags are just labels that you attach to data. You can define them for yourself, and attach multiple tags to the same data. So you could tag a piece of music by genre, key, instruments, your age when you first heard it, the name of the lover with whom you associate it and so on. Vertiginous terror of freedom.

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #83 on: February 14, 2014, 03:10:54 pm »

WAV is, in general, a poor format to store a music collection in. There is some tagging support, but it's pretty poor and a lot of apps don't use it.

Go ahead,,,, rub it in.. I deserve it...  :'(    ---- Yeah,,,, I learned that one the hard way... Oh well,,, it was only 135 gigs.......

Believe me we've all done it. I have previously ripped my collection in Ogg, 256k MP3, and now FLAC, as I have learned what works best. Since ripping to FLAC, I am comfortable that I should never need to re-rip.

Quote
I honestly can't remember why I used wav... I think it had something to do with having them in DAW format or something..... at any rate.... another project I should have run through on paper a few more times....

WAV is great for compatibility: FLAC has broad vendor support, but not everything supports it. But you can easily convert from FLAC to WAV (and back) without any generational loss. You can also convert down to MP3, Ogg, or AAC for use on media players.

Quote
I -think- at the time... I simply had no idea about the manager aspects nor tags and I'm still not clear on the tag part.

Tags (aka "metadata") are data which is embedded within the FLAC or MP3 itself, alongside the digital music data. If you are familiar with photography it's similar to EXIF data.

It's not the same as the filename, although there is some value to having a descriptive filename as well. There are tools which will copy information between the filename and the tags, or even create a new directory/filename structure for you to make it easy to find the files using a file browser.

But that's a nice to have. You can call your songs 1.flac, 2.flac, 3.flac if you really want (I know people who do this), as long as the tags are correct.

And, yes, ID3 is one of the main standards for this, and there's some variation: ID3v1 was pretty crude and limited. ID3v2 is much better and supports embedded album art and other capabilities. There's also variations within this (v2.3, v2.4, etc.). The biggest issue is music player support: some music players don't understand some of the newer variations.

But ID3 really applies to MP3. FLAC uses it's own tagging format called "Vorbis Comments", which is pretty standardised.

This is all technical detail though, and you generally don't need to worry about it. Just be aware that most music file formats have an internal data store which holds details about the track. Your main aim is to make sure this is populated with useful data, and then everything else tends to work itself out.

Quote
I think that's my problem right now... for instance on windows everyone says use EAC which is what I used before because it has great error correction. BUT... I have no idea what tags I need or how I tell if I have them. I know there is ID3 for mp3 but I don;t know if I see that with a FLAC rip or what... Yes it was M-Monkey...

My files just say . Take Me to the River.wav.... But if someone else did it, it might say...

01 Take Me to The River - then a string Title, artist, album, ext...

I mean I can see it looks different but I still don't know if I have all the data I need. The last thing I am worried about is storage space so I want all the tags or what ever I can get.

EAC is a good, well regarded app. Most rippers will do the work for you with tags, or at least as much as they can.

CDs generally contain no "metadata": there is nowhere on the CD which contains electronic information about the artist or song information. Most rippers will try to match any CD they rip with Internet databases in order to fill this data in for you and put it into the tags. This is normally pretty good, although it can make some mistakes so it's best to review each CD as you rip it and correct any mistakes, or use a tag editor to tidy it up afterwards.

Tag editors normally have bulk processing tools to allow you, for instance, to set the artist name on a select group of songs to be the same. A typical problem is minor data mismatches so you might, for instance, end up with this sort of thing:



Quote
I see what you mean about managers now and having the "master" but I still don;t know if masters are complete masters.

I'm not sure what you mean by this, but the aim should be to have the data in the tags as complete and accurate as possible. If you need to edit, edit the tag instead of some database that is derived from it.

By the way, many music manager programs (like iTunes) will do ripping, but they won't automatically tag the files as they are more concerned with maintaining their own database. If you only ever plan to use iTunes, that's fine, but if you want to move your music somewhere else or use a different system, then it's a problem as most other systems will not read the iTunes database. Tags in the files themselves will give you the most flexibility, and using Media Monkey or EAC to rip is the right way to go.

Quote
So have you got something maybe you can post a screen shot of just what the heck 'tags' are so I can see them all and which ones do what? Is there a list somewhere?

It's data, so there's a difficulty in that a graphical representation is just that, a view on that data. The screenshot I posted above is a music player's view of the artist tags, for instance.

However, this might help: it's a screen shot from Easytag:



This shows the folders on the hard drive (actually these are on my NAS) on the left with one folder selected, the middle lists the files in the selected folder. You can see there is a filename, and a separate title, artist, and so on. In my case these align, but there's no reason why they have to. The filename could easily be "wibble1.flac", "wibble2.flac" as I said before.

The pane on the right shows the tags for the selected file, as well as the filename at the top. I can edit either of these independently. The filename is, obviously, what you see on Windows explorer when you are browsing your folders. The other tags are internal to the file, and aren't normally visible unless you use an app that understands tags.

By the way, in case anyone wonders, this is a music collection on my NAS that is shared by my whole family, including my two daughters. Hence the Britney and B*Witched.

In fact, now I think about it, B*witched is a great example of how tags are independent of the filename, as "*" is a character you cannot use in a filename. So here's a screenshot of that to compare:



I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Keith
« Last Edit: February 14, 2014, 03:55:22 pm by Majik »
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline Dan Graves

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6604
  • Good Vibes 171
  • Is on the Outside, looking in
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #84 on: February 14, 2014, 03:41:14 pm »
Well thanks for the link TB, but as Keith made me realise, my issue was network congestion;  too many systems running wirelessly over one cheap POS router.
I put my Winblows system on a 5Ghz range router my boss provided me with, and the Pi's on a second one and set that to gateway mode, then sort of 'bridged' the routers so all devices can communicate.
Now there's no buffering, just a few ms of actual input lag (not surprising considering the amount of commands the Pi in question has to handle).
"You need a little bit of insanity to do great things"
--Henry Rollins

(If you need me for something, PM ME FOR FSM'S SAKE ! I'm not around a lot, and I do NOT have thread notifications on!)

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #85 on: February 14, 2014, 06:08:31 pm »
Ok,,,, yes, I get EXIF but can use an EXIF viewer to see things I might need say for a specific picture viewing / serving app.

My problem was... what data do I need for the player/server app to do it's thing... again, I think i just hosed that entire ordeal when I went with wav..

Basically I need to be sure that Vorbis window pane has it's needed data.

Song
Artist
Album

...and for whatever reason my songs lost their order. They simply got sorted alphabetically rather than mastering order. So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

The universe screeches on it's rails when Jusus Just Left Chicago doesn't follow Waitin' for the Bus.

It looks like to me that the file name handles this yet you say the file name doesn't matter.... which I kinda get... but don't get the 'keep the song order' part.

So I think I'm 90% there.
Gone

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #86 on: February 14, 2014, 06:59:42 pm »
Ok,,,, yes, I get EXIF but can use an EXIF viewer to see things I might need say for a specific picture viewing / serving app.

And you can use a tag editor to view the tag information.

Or you can use a music player/manager app, most of which will read these tags.

Or, if you are really feeling "hardcore", you can run a command-line program to output them:

$ metaflac --list --block-type=VORBIS_COMMENT "Justin Sandercoe - 03 - From Katie's Window.flac"
METADATA block #2
  type: 4 (VORBIS_COMMENT)
  is last: false
  length: 165
  vendor string: reference libFLAC 1.2.1 20070917
  comments: 6
    comment[0]: Artist=Justin Sandercoe
    comment[1]: Album=Small Town Eyes
    comment[2]: Date=2011
    comment[3]: Title=From Katie's Window
    comment[4]: Tracknumber=03
    comment[5]: Genre=Pop


Quote
My problem was... what data do I need for the player/server app to do it's thing... again, I think i just hosed that entire ordeal when I went with wav..

Basically I need to be sure that Vorbis window pane has it's needed data.

Song
Artist
Album

Well, for most rippers, it will do it automatically using Internet databases, as well as giving you the option to manually enter/edit them before you start ripping. For instance, if I stick a CD into my computer and open it with K3B I get the following:



(I had to go searching the house for a CD as all of my CDs are ripped and in storage)

This was pulled in from an Internet database called CDDB. If I want to edit any of the items before I rip, I can click on them to edit it. I can also edit the main album information:


I don't know MediaMonkey or EAC, but I would expect them to do something similar. It's a pretty standard capability on ripping software.

That database lookup also includes other fields, such as the genre and tracknumber...

By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

(Note there is a format known as Broadcast WAV or "BWF" for short, although it usually uses the .wav file extension, which does have some tag support)

Quote
...and for whatever reason my songs lost their order. They simply got sorted alphabetically rather than mastering order.

If you have no metadata (tags) or if the format you use doesn't support them, most apps will sort in filename order.

Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

There's also a CD number field that can be used for multi-CD sets, but most people I know just use the Tracknumber and renumber the whole lot from 1 upwards. The actual CD number it was originally on is pretty meaningless once you have ripped it.

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #87 on: February 14, 2014, 08:59:25 pm »
By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

Ok, that's what I just wanted to be absolutely sure of... iow... I won;t have that problem by default with FLAC unless I somehow create it on purpose.

Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

Ok, again that is what was throwing me because it looks like in your screen shots the Track # is only part of file name and you said file name basically carried no weight. I see how that command line has now looked inside the file and sees that FKW is track 03 but I don;t see that info anywhere but in file name. So I was wondering how the hell do I know what I ended up with after the rip? Do you see what I mean?

and yes EAC will go the Freedb or whatever and pull that info... I simply didn't realize I was telling it to go get the info and then recording it to a format that was saying ok, toss that extra mess we don't do that.

Ok, I appreciate it ordeal of explaining it... I just had this feeling of uncertainty. I don;t really need a lot of data or care much about all the extras. I'll take them if easy enough to get but I sure don't want to do this again and find out... oohhhh, you left off that one little piece of data that would have made all work.

Britney Spears eh? Who would have guessed...

Gone

Offline Majik

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2016
  • Good Vibes 122
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #88 on: February 14, 2014, 09:29:47 pm »
By ripping to WAV, you were basically telling the ripper to not bother with tag data, as it has nowhere to put them.

Ok, that's what I just wanted to be absolutely sure of... iow... I won;t have that problem by default with FLAC unless I somehow create it on purpose.

You shouldn't do. To convince yourself, do a test rip. It's always good to do that anyway, to get used to the software and to understand things like where the files end up, etc.

Quote
Quote
So just so I am clear... what exact piece of data keeps the songs sorted properly.

Tracknumber (see the command line above)

Ok, again that is what was throwing me because it looks like in your screen shots the Track # is only part of file name and you said file name basically carried no weight. I see how that command line has now looked inside the file and sees that FKW is track 03 but I don;t see that info anywhere but in file name. So I was wondering how the hell do I know what I ended up with after the rip? Do you see what I mean?

No, I don't...



:D

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
All sorts of other stuff.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: The big 'ole Raspberry Pi topic
« Reply #89 on: February 14, 2014, 10:04:45 pm »
OOOOOHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!! I see it now..... Man... these glasses from the dollar store... I guess I need to upgrade them too.

OK... 10-4...... I've got it now.... Nationwide!!!!




Gone

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App