Author Topic: Beginner question  (Read 4073 times)

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Offline mmcgrath1369

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Beginner question
« on: January 05, 2014, 10:43:47 pm »
I have a beginner question. When a sheet of music indicates a certain note, G as an example, how do you know which string to play the G note on seeing as though there is a G on every string?

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2014, 10:52:33 pm »
The short answer is you don't.

In many cases there are at least a couple different positions you can read the part in.

If it is a vocal melody chances are you can play it in the open position.

That is one reason for the popularity of tab.

With experience you can scan the piece and look for the lowest and highest notes which can help you decide what position or positions you want to play and where you may want to shift positions.  Takes a bit of experience to do that efficiently.

Shadow
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Offline mmcgrath1369

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2014, 11:01:24 pm »
Got it. Thanks

Offline Rolandson

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2014, 01:32:51 pm »
I bought the app yesterday and I have no clue how this is working.

Offline Bobke

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2014, 02:53:22 pm »
I have a beginner question. When a sheet of music indicates a certain note, G as an example, how do you know which string to play the G note on seeing as though there is a G on every string?

Leaving all the music theory aside, as you state to be a beginner: when you see a G -in the middle of the vertical lines in sheet music- play the 3rd (counting from the thinnest string) string
open.  Count the other notes up or down from there, e.g. lower D is the open 4th (D) string, E is 4th string 2nd fret, F is 4th string 3rd fret, G is open 3rd string, A is 2nd fret 3rd string, B is 2nd string open, C is 2nd string 1st fret, etc. Count up and down on all the strings while finding the successive notes on the first four frets on every string.

Offline Melsie

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2014, 05:06:16 pm »
I have a beginner question. When a sheet of music indicates a certain note, G as an example, how do you know which string to play the G note on seeing as though there is a G on every string?

First of all, if you're playing it as written then you need to play it in the correct octave, so not all of the places to fret a G will be suitable. But even then there will often still be a few options. Where you play it is dictated by context or personal preference. For instance, if I'm strumming open chords and then I have to play a single note of G4 to use your example, and then move back to more open chords, I could fret the G4 at:
Fret 3 on the 1st string
Fret 8 on the 2nd string
Fret 12 on the 3rd string
Fret 17 on the 4th string
Fret 22 on the 5th string

Common sense would dictate that I play it on the 1st string, because my hand's already close to the nut from playing the open chords.

Offline Tazz3

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Re: Beginner question
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2014, 03:53:52 am »
Leaving all the music theory aside, as you state to be a beginner: when you see a G -in the middle of the vertical lines in sheet music- play the 3rd (counting from the thinnest string) string
open.  Count the other notes up or down from there, e.g. lower D is the open 4th (D) string, E is 4th string 2nd fret, F is 4th string 3rd fret, G is open 3rd string, A is 2nd fret 3rd string, B is 2nd string open, C is 2nd string 1st fret, etc. Count up and down on all the strings while finding the successive notes on the first four frets on every string.
this is a great tip I will follow it

 

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