Author Topic: Looking for specific Photography link  (Read 2137 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Looking for specific Photography link
« on: February 26, 2012, 09:11:26 pm »
I saw a photog video the other day and I think on Youtube.

Things I know.

The guy has "channel" and makes a lot of instruction videos.
I don't think he is from USA but can't recall accent.
The video I saw he had, I think, and Asian model and she was talking on a cell phone.
The setting was outdoors at a typical residential home. By front door and by burgundy garage door.

The video was about making interesting composition and lighting. there were some hanging basket plants.

That's all I've got

If this rings a bell with anyone I would like to find that guys instructional videos again.
Gone

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2170
  • Good Vibes 64
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2012, 09:49:08 pm »
If it is an Asian guy - try searching You Tube for digitalrevcom.

This guy is interesting too http://www.ishootshows.com/

The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2012, 12:23:21 am »
Nope, not him. I'm wondering if I saw it on another video site now like VEMEO of something. But everything seem to end up on YT anyway.

Gone

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2012, 01:43:06 am »
Gone

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2170
  • Good Vibes 64
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2012, 02:02:34 am »
It really had me racking my brain because I thought I knew the magority of you tube self-styled "photography gurus".

Didn't really see you as a Ken Rockwell or Fro Knows kind of guy.... actually Fro in small doses is OK...
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

ambersmiths

  • Guest

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2012, 12:02:40 pm »
Quote
It really had me racking my brain because I thought I knew the magority of you tube self-styled "photography gurus".

Didn't really see you as a Ken Rockwell or Fro Knows kind of guy.... actually Fro in small doses is OK...

Yeah, I stumbled on that guy somehow and thought his delivery style was really understandable.

I used to read Fred Miranda and DPSreview sites and a few video forums but still don;t feel comfortable with a camera. for some reason no matter how much I read I still can't just pick up a camera and automatically know what I doing. I guess it's like everything else I just haven't practiced it enough. Never heard of that Fro guy.

I always liked this guy's tutorials although he slammed a lot on the forums. http://super.nova.org/DPR/



Gone

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2170
  • Good Vibes 64
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2012, 01:12:42 pm »
I stuff around with full manual mode - as well as manually set ISO, use specific focussing and metering modes, and swap lenses, but if I'm shooting and I know I won't have too much time to think, but still want to have a certain amount of control of how the shot comes out:

I set focus to single point auto focus

I set metering to matrix

Might be overly simplistic - but then I just try to think of what is more important:

- the focus (portraits, scenery, stills) then I use the aperture priority - for portraits & stills you generally want a narrow depth of field, for scenery generally a deeper depth of field

- catching the action (kids, clouds, lights, water, sport) then I use shutter priority - to freeze the action you want fast shutter speed, for blur or low light a slower shutter speed.

With modern cameras having such fantastic results at high ISO's I set ISO to Auto capped at 3200 - purist shudder at this, but I reckon that is more a case of snobbishness than for any substantive reason.

A good telephoto zoom will sacrifice a bit of quality but is very versatile - I shoot 90% of my pics with an 18-200mm lens (my main camera is Nikon DX format so really the equivalent of 27-300mm on a 35mm camera). To a degree, programs like Lightroom will allow you to correct some of the lens created quality issue (the presets for different lenses work remarkably well).

Shooting RAW also gives you maximum opportunity to fix up any little sins later on the PC.

Using the above method it didn't take too long for it to become intuitive.

I just can't bring myself to shoot in full auto - cameras are getting more sophisticated all the time but generally you will take better shots more consistently if you take control.

When I have time to think and set up, I set the focus and metering mode to what I think will get the best result and use a fixed focal length lens, and set ISO - all of which I still cant do intuitively - I need to really think about them and I rarely use the full manual mode for the same reason.

NB most or all of these settings are even available on compact digital cameras these days so I never use auto on them either.

The other variables of composition and lighting really only come from practice and looking at other peoples photos to try and work out what makes a photo great or a flop.

Fro in small doses is instructive http://froknowsphoto.com/
« Last Edit: March 15, 2012, 01:29:20 pm by Bootstrap »
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2170
  • Good Vibes 64
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2012, 01:35:12 pm »
Of all the 100's of photography sites I've been to - these three were the most helpful:

This one for general "how to" http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials.htm

And this two because they finally explained the relationship between ISO, shutter speed and aperture setting in simple language that even I could understand - before these sites all explanations of f/stops, focal point and depth of field just seemed like so much mumbo jumbo to me http://www.uscoles.com/fstop.htm http://www.paragon-press.com/lens/lenchart.htm
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14966
  • Good Vibes 329
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2012, 03:05:10 pm »
I'll have to check out those links.

Generally I don't have time to setup and think about what would work best. Lots of times my photos are accidentally found. Often times the subject is moving or will move if I don't hurry.

If I have time I will try various settings but I still don;t have it carved into my brain as to which direction to go in.

I've got a Pan LX5 that I really like. That stay with me all the time. Then I have a Canon Rebel with a couple of lenses. A 2.8 28-70 and I think a 90-300 or similar with a 1.5 or 2x converter as well.

I don;t think I've ever taken a shot where the whole thing is good. I've cropped a few down that had some interesting things. I also just like to piddle around with PShop and make things more interesting if not "art".

I like composites.

 
Gone

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2170
  • Good Vibes 64
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: Looking for specific Photography link
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2012, 07:26:49 pm »
Getting the "money shot" is an elusive mistress TB.

I've nailed a few. The best have been targets of opportunity.

I carry an Olympus compact around with me everywhere I go. I have another Olympus with a 20x fixed zoom lens that I use occasionally where I want something lighter than an SLR and don't really care a whole lot if it gets beaten up or broken.

My weapon of choice is a Nikon D7000 - I've got a raft of fixed focal length lenses - but the only one I use regularly is the 300mm with and without a 1.4 teleconverter for sports or nature. Though for a good portrait shot with good bokeh, I use a fast 50mm but these are usually for someone else, not because I wanted to take the shot.

Anyhoo as I said - the simplest way is think of what is most important at the time - focus or catching the action and choose aperture priority and shutter speed priority as appropriate - let the camera do the rest.
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App