Author Topic: Chord Progressions  (Read 2048 times)

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Offline Toad

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Chord Progressions
« on: January 31, 2011, 02:43:01 am »
If I steal chord progressions from other songs, is that a form of plagiarism?  I change the rhythm and the tempo though.

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2011, 03:06:48 am »
If that were the case none of us could write a Blues piece using I IV V - not sure about other chord progressions but watch out when it comes to riffs:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/07/06/2945781.htm
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Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2011, 04:28:44 am »
If that were the case none of us could write a Blues piece using I IV V - not sure about other chord progressions but watch out when it comes to riffs:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/07/06/2945781.htm


Remember the My Sweet Lord/He's So Fine case?  From Wikipedia:

"Following the song's release, musical similarities between "My Sweet Lord" and The Chiffons' hit "He's So Fine" led to a lengthy legal battle over the rights to the composition. Billboard magazine, in an article dated 6 March 1971, stated that Harrison's royalty payments from the recording had been halted worldwide. Harrison stated that he was inspired to write "My Sweet Lord" after hearing the Edwin Hawkins Singers' "Oh Happy Day".[citation needed]

In the U.S. federal court decision in the case, known as Bright Tunes Music v. Harrisongs Music,[3] Harrison was found to have "subconsciously" copied the earlier song. He was ordered to surrender the majority of royalties from "My Sweet Lord" and partial royalties from All Things Must Pass. Former manager Allen Klein, who earlier had supported Harrison's case, became the owner of Bright Tunes, after they parted ways. Harrison claimed in a BBC interview with Annie Nightingale that the Judge in the case said that he liked Harrison's version of "My Sweet Lord" less.

The Chiffons would later record "My Sweet Lord" to capitalise on the publicity generated by the lawsuit. Country singer Jody Miller recorded a country chart top-five cover of "He's So Fine", which plays on the two songs' similarities by featuring the same guitar breaks played on the Harrison recording.

Shortly thereafter, Harrison (who would eventually buy the rights to "He's So Fine")[4] wrote and recorded a song about the court case named "This Song", which includes "This tune has nothing 'Bright' about it." "I Can't Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch)" and "Rescue Me" are also mentioned in the record."

The thing is, many many times we are just reorganizing and repeating what we have heard, even in literature it's easy to use someone else's phrasing or language or even a sentence you've read and think it's yours.  You can't worry about it tho.  If it's not conscious, it's not conscious. 



Pat
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Offline Toad

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Re: Chord Progressions
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2011, 04:43:10 am »
Cool thanks.

 

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