Author Topic: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale  (Read 7241 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« on: December 03, 2010, 03:27:18 pm »
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 05:16:35 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline close2u

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2011, 02:13:06 pm »

Offline qwerties1

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2015, 09:26:44 am »
I can't find an answer for this anywhere, can I improvise using the A major pentatonic scale over a backing track in A major?

Offline Majik

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2015, 09:59:08 am »
Yes.
The major pentatonic scale uses the same notes as the major scale except two are "missing".

So, for instance, A major scale use the following notes:
A B C# D E F# G#

The A major pentatonic scale has the following notes:
A B C# E F#

The difference is the pentatonic scale doesn't use the D or G# notes, so it's just like you played an A major scale improvisation but never used those two notes.

Cheers,

Keith

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Offline malurod

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2015, 10:28:39 am »
Hello!
Is there a deeper meaning in using fingers 1 and 3 on the highest strings? Is there an advantage compared to using fingers 2 and 4?
Regards.

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2015, 03:29:18 pm »
Fingers 1 and 3 are generally stronger than 2 and 4. 

It becomes a trade off between the half step position shift to keep using 1 and 3, versus avoiding the position shift and using 2 and 4.

Justin talks a little bit about the philosophy of using different fingers with the series of lessons on the major scale in the intermediate course.  There is a difference between the fingering you use when learning and practicing a scale and when using the scale.  I think something similar applies here.

In use, shifting to use 1 and 3 is going to happen in many cases.

Shadow

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Offline Majik

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2015, 03:58:27 pm »
One difference is that the 4th finger isn't that strong for bending

Cheers,

Keith
Guitars: PRS Singlecut S2, Fender Tele Lite Ash, G&L Legacy Tribute, Freshman Apollo 2 OCBX
Amps: Bugera G5 Head, Boss Katana 100
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Offline TokyoGuitar

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2015, 08:50:58 am »
man, just "discovered" the soundcloud backing track, and am addicted! I just can't seem to stop listening/playing over it. WAY too much fun!

Thank you again, Justin, for doing this.

(I feel just a little like a real honest-to-goodness guitar player while doing this...)
We learned more from a 3-minute record, baby, than we ever learned in school --- Bruce Springsteen

Offline captainamerica

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2017, 07:18:12 pm »
A few questions:

1) I noticed that if you choose to do the major pentatonic with C as the root, its relative minor A is the top root on the first string, as if you had chosen to do the minor pentatonic with A as the root.  I assume that this is not "accidental," as the A is the relative minor to C....?

2) the scale covered in lesson 113 is called the "major scale," while the scale in this lesson is called the "major pentatonic scale".  Why the difference, and what does the "pentatonic" refer to?

3) are there any advantages/disadvantages/reasons to choose the major scale over the pentatonic scale when playing a solo, for instance?  Is the best answer - "just use your ears?" 

4) this lesson presented positions 1 and 5; are positions 2-4 covered in a module elsewhere, and are they useful?

Thanks.
Completed: BC, IM.  Now focused on aural/ear training and blues rhythm course....stay focused on Justin's teachings and they will guide you...

Offline joueur de guitare

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2017, 09:09:05 pm »
A few questions:

1) I noticed that if you choose to do the major pentatonic with C as the root, its relative minor A is the top root on the first string, as if you had chosen to do the minor pentatonic with A as the root.  I assume that this is not "accidental," as the A is the relative minor to C....?

2) the scale covered in lesson 113 is called the "major scale," while the scale in this lesson is called the "major pentatonic scale".  Why the difference, and what does the "pentatonic" refer to?

3) are there any advantages/disadvantages/reasons to choose the major scale over the pentatonic scale when playing a solo, for instance?  Is the best answer - "just use your ears?" 

4) this lesson presented positions 1 and 5; are positions 2-4 covered in a module elsewhere, and are they useful?

Thanks.
Quote from: Justin Sandercoe
Start Here! You might save yourself a lot of time and energy!

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-000-Scales.php


Might I suggest that you explore Justin's site rather than treating every subject as a target to be met, overcome, repeat?

That won't make me popular, but...
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Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2017, 11:00:26 pm »
Penta meaning 5 as in 5 notes.
Yes the A minor is the relative minor to the Cmjor and they both have the same notes.
The difference is where you place the root.
When you start with the C as your root the note E is the third if you start with the A as the root
the third would be C# for the A major scale but in this scale the note is C being a flat 3rd so that
is what makes it minor. The note E is now the 5th of the scale. Make a big diference when playing
over a chord progression.

There is less notes in the pentatonic scale so less to think about and these 5 notes all sound good in
a solo. 

Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2017, 11:20:16 pm »
I should add it is the same for every scale and it's relative minor.
The relative minor is the 6th of the major scale.
An easy way to find both is the relative minor is three note down the fret board from the major.
C scale eighth fret of the E string. Am 5th fret of the E string.

Offline captainamerica

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2017, 11:43:37 pm »
I should add it is the same for every scale and it's relative minor.  The relative minor is the 6th of the major scale.  An easy way to find both is the relative minor is three note down the fret board from the major.  C scale eighth fret of the E string. Am 5th fret of the E string.

Thanks for your always helpful replies, stitch.
Completed: BC, IM.  Now focused on aural/ear training and blues rhythm course....stay focused on Justin's teachings and they will guide you...

Offline captainamerica

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2017, 11:45:34 pm »

https://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-000-Scales.php


Might I suggest that you explore Justin's site rather than treating every subject as a target to be met, overcome, repeat?

That won't make me popular, but...

Thank you for the link.

I have and continue to sift through the site but with over 1,000 lessons, it is a bit difficult to remember each page/section/set of lessons. 

Not sure what you mean by your last statement.
Completed: BC, IM.  Now focused on aural/ear training and blues rhythm course....stay focused on Justin's teachings and they will guide you...

Offline Arnold Martinson

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Re: IM-153 • Major Pentatonic Scale
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2018, 06:14:45 pm »
I question why the comment (even emphasized in capital letters) that a person can not directly play minor pentatonic licks in the major pentatonic box?  If I am playing over an A 1,4,5, then am I not still correct when I slide up from box one minor to what Justin call box 5 major (same pattern) and use the same lick and hear it as major?   I t seems I should still be hearing everything in A, not F#m.  Other lessons have talked that you can play licks with any note within a scale over any of the chords within a key (ie, playing A,D&E, I should be able to play any of the A minor pentatonic scale, so I assume I should be able to slide up and use any of the A major pentatonic in the same way.  Example, play a lick with a,c, d in minor pentatonic box 1 (strings 3&4) and then go up to major pentatonic box 5 and play a, b and F#.  They seem fine.). What am I missing?

 

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