Author Topic: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves  (Read 6390 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« on: December 03, 2010, 12:11:55 pm »
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 05:09:08 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline bunnahowen

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 09:50:24 pm »
Regarding the above. Is this a device to help learn the notes on the neck or does it have another purpose? My point being that up to this point I worked out the notes using the Note Circle.
Thanks.

Offline TB-AV

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2011, 11:03:14 pm »
If you want to play octaves it is useful without having to think about two of the same notes. You know the pattern is an octave so you just play it. You could be playing along and not even know what note you are on and still know how to play octaves.

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Offline perfopt

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2011, 10:13:45 am »
In the four diagrams in this lesson os the note played with the second finger always 1 octave higher than the one played with the first finger?

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2011, 01:13:27 pm »
Yes. The low note (left most on the lower string) and the high note (right most on the higher string) are always an octave apart.

The most typical fingering is index and ring except for the last.

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Offline yosi231

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2020, 05:12:59 pm »
Hey! Is memorizing all notes on the fretboard with the octave shapes method enough?
Or is it a better long term strategy to practice remembering notes immidietly without any "anchors" (points of reference) to be able to name/find the note immidietly?

Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2020, 05:45:10 pm »
It all depends on how far you want to take your playing.
If all you want to do is play open chords and play easy sing along songs then you
don't need to know any notes on the fret board.

If you're interested in music theory it's not all that hard to know the note on the
fret board. There are only 12 note and they just keep repeating.
So it's up to you on how much you want to learn.
Octive shapes is a good start.

Offline yosi231

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2020, 07:12:35 pm »
 Guitar is my hobby, but  I'm planning to take it very far. So the question is. Which approach is better for the long term for becoming a complete musician? The chord shapes Seem like a good tool. But I'm not sure that it's a good approach for the long term. Maybe I should just memorize them all from the get go?

Offline microsnout

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2020, 09:35:33 pm »
I still consider myself a beginner but I can tell you how I ended up learning the entire fretboard.
 
It was 2 and a half years ago, spring 2018. I had just started Justin's course, struggling with making the foul D chord ring clearly when I decided to take lessons with a local teacher.  He asked me to put aside chords for a while and work on the Hal Leonard Guitar Method book 1.  This book was full of tunes that nobody ever requests around a campfire like "Ode to Joy", "Au Clair de la Lune" and "Greensleeves". 

The book plays these tunes in open position but my teacher had his own way, beginning in 9th position (frets 9 to 12). He did this because the frets are closer together making it easier for beginners and also ... so i would learn the whole fretboard.  We then moved to 5th position (fret 5 to 8 ) and played some of the same tunes. I found I needed to stretch further since the stupid B note was outside this range on the 9th.  Finally we moved to open position which again was different because I was used to fretting each note, not playing open strings. I then knew all the natural notes and the sharps came next when playing tunes in the keys of G,D,A and E - and when you add 'C' and rearrange the letters spells "Caged". Coincidence ? I think not!

This approach also taught me the value of reading music notation because the tab for a tune would be different in each of the 3 positions above.  The music notation however is independent of the position you play it in so I can take a song and play it in any of those positions.  I ordered Justin's book "Note Reading for Guitarists" and practiced this for a while.

I can still play some of these tunes from memory in 1,2 or even 3 positions but rarely do anymore - But I do know all the notes on the fretboard!
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Offline sairfingers

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2020, 09:58:59 pm »
It was 2 and a half years ago, spring 2018. I had just started Justin's course, struggling with making the foul D chord ring clearly when I decided to take lessons with a local teacher.  He asked me to put aside chords for a while and work on the Hal Leonard Guitar Method book 1.  This book was full of tunes that nobody ever requests around a campfire like "Ode to Joy", "Au Clair de la Lune" and "Greensleeves". 
Hi there
I can’t offer any advice on memorising the fretboard, but kudos to you for learning anything after being given a songbook containing these tunes. I was reading your post and it gave me nightmarish reminders of why I didn’t do anything with music when I was younger. These are the very tunes that put me off learning any instrument!

I clearly should have looked beyond them but as a youngster you don’t have that ability. Anyway as a 66 year old I’m having musical fun now. 😃
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Offline GrowlingDog

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2020, 10:22:00 pm »
I don’t know the answer to your question, as I’m still quite new to learning guitar, however from a playing perspective it is probably not necessary.

I play organ, so my brain can read music and very quickly put fingers or feet down on the three or four different notes.

I don’t see notes individually Eg, A, C, E, G,    I look at how far the notes differ from the root note, in this case C, and then I see I also need the 3rd, 5th, and 6th note, and my fingers know the shape required to produce that.   I don’t necessarily register what other notes I am playing.

I suspect playing quitar will be similar, as long as you can find the root note, all other notes required will be a shape that you learn based on distance from the root note, so you are always just moving a set position based on distance from previous note, rather than thinking play C, then play D.     Playing like this will help enormously if you need to play in another key, you will just move up or down the neck without worrying too much about what notes you are playing.


Offline Twin Six

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2020, 10:57:12 pm »
Since you're asking about it, you must feel that it's important. It's just brain work. Justin has a course that will get you started.

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Offline J.W.C.

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2020, 11:02:05 pm »
Hey! Is memorizing all notes on the fretboard with the octave shapes method enough?
Or is it a better long term strategy to practice remembering notes immidietly without any "anchors" (points of reference) to be able to name/find the note immidietly?

If you follow Justin's program you will eventually learn the notes of the fretboard.

At first, it's fine to just memorize the 6th/1st and 5th strings, and the related octaves. You'll gradually build on that foundation, and it becomes even more important/useful when you get to triads up and down the fretboard (I think that's in the intermediate course).

My advice is to take it in steps, rather than trying for "the whole fretboard at once." Lay a foundation, then build on that foundation.


Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2020, 11:20:42 pm »
Guitar is my hobby, but  I'm planning to take it very far. So the question is. Which approach is better for the long term for becoming a complete musician? The chord shapes Seem like a good tool. But I'm not sure that it's a good approach for the long term. Maybe I should just memorize them all from the get go?

Learning the CAGED system will really help to hnow the fret board and how it's laid out.
How chords and scales relate to each other as you learn this you'll learn the notes on tbe
neck.
Have you finished the beginner course? If not do that first.

Offline CT

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2020, 02:13:01 am »
Learn the fretboard! How you do it is up to you and the sooner the better. Learn all the things, scales, chords in a key, intervals, triads -- all of it. The learning in this regard never ends. Enjoy the journey! 

Offline meisterlampe1989

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2020, 05:28:53 am »
Learning the notes on the fretboard seems difficult but it is easier than one might think.

The method Justin showed Lee Anderton in his 1 on 1 lessons were you just take a note and play it on every string with no open strings from the thick E to the thin e and back is crazy effective. At least for me. 5 minutes every day... not more.

I have done this only a week and there are some notes were my finger just goes to the right place... this is a crazy and rewarding feeling.

Offline yosi231

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Re: IM-116 • Finding Notes On The Neck Using Octaves
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2020, 08:24:29 am »
OP here, forgot to mention i just finished justins begginer course, starting the intermediate foundation 1.
Also finished the ear training course (being able to tell all tought intervals pretty easily), and also im at the midway through the music theory 4.1 course.
(being very proficient at all the things ive gone through, not just brain storming them).

 

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