Author Topic: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips  (Read 26665 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« on: December 03, 2010, 03:24:51 pm »
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 05:08:00 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Svenshinhan

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 05:06:42 am »
I'm not sure if this is intended or not, but the link in the IM foundation list leads to an old 2007 or 2008 lesson on triad chord grips, and not to the lesson page with the proper IM 151 foundation video.

I could only find that IM 151 video by specifically looking for it on YouTube, not from anywhere on the site (that may also be why it doesn't have the same high number of views on YT as the other vids, because people aren't directed to it through the site).

Offline komani86

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2011, 01:02:01 pm »
Had the same aswell, but I think on the site its broken down more, so its easier to follow.
I also noticed that I dont care for triad chords (on acoustic atleast) much.. I just practice them now, but i dont know.. I miss the bass strings I guess?

Also, I try to palm mute the last 3 strings, but I notice its harder to strum freely then.
I think I saw people reaching over with their thumb to mute the 5th,6th string and mute the 4th with the finger thats on the 3rd string.. wise to master the grips/changes (which aint hard at all) first before doing that or just do it all at once?

Offline sophiehiker

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2011, 02:25:48 pm »
It was a revelation to me to find that triad chords can be found hidden within barre chord grips.

For example, grab a C# minor barre, root on the 5th string.  Lift up the pinkie and you have an E major triad on the 2-3-4 strings.  Makes the chord change super easy!

Grab a A major barre, root on the 6th string.  Move ring and pinkie fingers (I'll let you figure out how) and you have a F# minor on the 2-3-4 strings.

Neat and easy!

...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

joshs

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2011, 02:09:26 am »
Something I'm trying to get my head around is how some (all?) 7th chords contain two triads. A major 7th has a major triad (of course), but also a minor triad (up a 3rd from the root). m7th has the reverse. m7b5 has a diminished triad and a minor triad. Diminished 7th... well it has four diminished triads. Dominant 7th has a major triad and then a diminished triad up a 3rd. It's weird to think about how the sounds work together in those chords and also how to make use of these "hidden" triads when playing along with other people, especially if someone is covering the bass notes. Or how about if someone else in the band plays a triad and the bass player tosses in the right bass note to make it sound like a 7th chord by playing a "new root".

It was a revelation to me to find that triad chords can be found hidden within barre chord grips.

Offline sophiehiker

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2011, 02:28:52 pm »

+1 @joshs.  Your explaination makes this much clearer.  Thanks.

I was watching George Harrison play rhythm on "All my Loving" and trying to figure out what he was doing. 

He grabs a C#m7, while John's playing a Emajor triad.  He grabs a DMaj7/A, when John's playing a F#m triad.

...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

joshs

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2011, 07:14:15 pm »
Just goes to show, anything you can possibly think of musically, "Beatles did it!" ;-)

Offline artonsafari

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2011, 10:24:36 pm »
So I decided that I'd figure out the Minor, Augmented, and Diminished versions of these triads as I was bored and had just recently done the Practical Music Theory lesson on Chord Theory Use.

Ok, Justin said to work out the grips for the Minor triads.
Got them done and continued to Augmented and I saw something neat. All three Augmented triad patterns are the same, only the root note shifts strings.

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Offline jesseJay

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2012, 11:56:40 pm »
Questions...

Lesson Link: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/CH-008-Triads.php

Hi!
I have a question regarding "finger-posture" regarding playing triades and the like.
Down to approx. the 5th fret (frets 1-5) I can use a "slanted" finger-style to get the e.g. strings 1 and 2 (5th fret) pressed down simultaneously with the tip of my 1st finger (e.g. for  G-major, strings 1,2,3, shape 1). Below the 5th fret I cannot do that! Instead I have to use a somewhat "classical" finger-posture (thumb below neck) to get the 2 strings pressed simultaneously with a larger portion of my 1st finger. So, what is the "correct" (if any) finger posture for playing triades (and also the shapes for the "chips" in a later lesson)? Thanks for helping! Best Wishes from Germany, Juergen 

joshuade

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2013, 02:28:13 am »
A technical question here:

I noticed that at the end of the video, Justin mentioned the fact that you need to use your strumming hand to mute the lowest three strings (E,A,D). For some reason, I'm having quite a difficult time learn this technique because when I do it, my palm will either mute the G string when I'm strumming or will reduce my wrist's range of motion making 8th or 16th strumming very difficult. Which part of my hand specifically do I use to mute the lowest three strings and how do I ensure that the G string won't be interrupted? I've tried using my thumb to mute the lowest two strings but it can't reach the third one. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

joshs

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2013, 06:06:09 am »
Could use your palm, similar to palm muting. I usually just use my left fingers (whichever is convenient) to mute the 4th string and avoid hitting the top two (not too difficult).

joshuade

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2013, 08:21:33 pm »
Yeah I just find it very difficult to strum when palm muting. I don't know how Justin does it to be honest.

joshs

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2013, 01:43:52 am »
I think it definitely makes it harder, but it's like anything, you can learn. But like I said, I find it much easier to use my fret hand to mute. That way, you don't have to worry about it at all.

vikingking

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2013, 10:26:39 pm »
Hello Everyone,

Of the three major triad shapes on the GBE strings all of them can be played by holding a standard 5th string or 6th string barre shape, except the D shape one.

is there any reason why I would learn these two with the fingering in the lessons, ie. with three fingers, rather than just use my barre shapes.  Note: In my case my fingers seem the right length for the high e string to ring out on the 5th string barre.

It would be easier if I don't have to play them with a new shape and it perhaps allows more flexibility in the playing.  I'm sure there's something I may not have thought of though or some good reason further down the line.

Can anyone offer some thoughts?

Thanks, Bernard.

joshs

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2013, 03:20:52 am »
I'd say only one of the triads is easily playable from the barre version. The barre chord based on the open A shape is really hard to get the high string to ring out on. Also, if you're playing a quick succession of these triads, it's faster not to involve a full barre. But probably the biggest advantage is that you can easily get the high strings to ring out without any of the lower ones. All that said, I use 'em cause I like 'em :-)

vikingking

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2013, 10:44:02 am »
Thanks, some good thoughts there.  Particularly the the speed one.  I think I'll learn both ways of doing it.

I find that connecting the triad to the barre chord helps me work out the root note.  The recognition that they're the same too feels like it offers a bit of flexibility too.

Good stuff.  Thank you.   :)

Offline Oddo

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2013, 12:57:48 pm »
Can you explain me how to form triads on strings 3,4,5?.Is it important the finger which plays the root like in the shapes that Justin taught us?

Offline sophiehiker

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2013, 05:23:40 pm »
@Oddo, do you mean strings 2,3,4?  I think Justin asks you, in this lesson, to find the triads on strings 2,3,4.

Anyway. there will be three shapes for a major chord and three shapes for a minor chord.  The root note will appear once on each string.

Take a D major chord for example.  It consists of the notes D F# A.  Where is the D note on the second string?  It's on the third fret.   Where is the nearest A note?  It's on the third string, second fret.  How about F#?  It's on the fourth string, fourth fret. 

That's it!  The D major triad is xx423x.  Now you can move that shape up and down the neck to make different major chords.  The root will always be on the second string.

Now you can find the triad shapes with the root note on the third and fourth strings.  Hope that helps.
...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

Offline mouser9169

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2013, 06:41:08 pm »
Can you explain me how to form triads on strings 3,4,5?.Is it important the finger which plays the root like in the shapes that Justin taught us?

Every group of three strings has triad shapes. The root note is what names the chord, what fingering you use isn't the main thing. Each triad has two inversions. So there are three shapes for a major chord triad on strings 6,5,4; three on strings 5,4,3; three on strings 4,3,2; and three on strings 3,2,1. That isn't counting 'odd' voicings like R 5 3 (not a normal inversion). You can also make triads skipping strings, I suppose if you really get technical.

If you remember the major shape and which notes are the root, third, and fifth, then you know to drop the third to make it minor, drop the 5th from there to make it diminished, and from the major, raise the 5th to make it augmented - so you can make four triads by remembering one.

Loads and loads of shapes to learn - take your time with it. It's better to have two shapes you really understand than 40 you don't. They're great for learning the fretboard - loads of things you can do. One day you can find every G major triad on the neck. Another day pick another note. Eventually the stuff sinks in as you use them when you play.


For your question: A D major triad on strings 3, 4, 5 in root position (R 3 5) would be x 5 4 2 x x it's the basic shape for both the C and G chords (G is the same shape moved over to 4, 5, 6) The shape is always the same for those two string sets. Remember everything moves a fret when you cross the 2nd string. D major in first inversion (3 5 R) is x 9 7 7 x x. D major in 2nd inversion (5 R 3) is x 12 12 10 xx
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Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2013, 06:47:42 pm »
Can you explain me how to form triads on strings 3,4,5?.Is it important the finger which plays the root like in the shapes that Justin taught us?

You can form triads any where on the neck. A simple example of a triad on the 2 3 4 strings is the open
A major or A minor chords just play the three strings that are fretted. An example on the 3 4 5 is an
E major or E minor in both examples the three fretted (one open string for the minor) are the R 3rd(3b)
and 5th but not in that order. These are also movable chords just like Barre chords.

Edit  Was typing when mouser posted

Offline TB-AV

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2013, 11:38:30 pm »
Can you explain me how to form triads on strings 3,4,5?.Is it important the finger which plays the root like in the shapes that Justin taught us?

Learn the CAGED shapes and how each is comprised of notes 1 3 5 and that is a Major triad. 5 Shapes or 5 open chords and you will see triads all over the neck no matter which strings you choose to use.
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Offline dezag.c

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2013, 08:20:43 pm »
Great lesson on triads
 I am struggling to play the first shape  using my first finger to barr the  first and second strings

I play it with my first finger on the root note on the first string, my second finder on the  second string and my third finger on the third string

is it ok to keep playing this way or should I keep practising  trying to barr  first and second strings

I find when I do that and put my second finger down on the third string it muets the second string  put my third

does anyone have any suggestions

thanks

derek

Offline TheReplicant

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2013, 08:56:58 pm »
Great lesson on triads
 I am struggling to play the first shape  using my first finger to barr the  first and second strings

I play it with my first finger on the root note on the first string, my second finder on the  second string and my third finger on the third string

is it ok to keep playing this way or should I keep practising  trying to barr  first and second strings

I find when I do that and put my second finger down on the third string it muets the second string  put my third

does anyone have any suggestions

thanks

derek

I think that if you're doing the changes fast enough it doesn't matter. I'd persevere with the recommended way, though. Try and bring your palm forward, directly under the neck and see if it stops you muting the b string. You can also raise your second finger slightly so it's muting the d string as most of the time it's not played anyway (it is in Substitute, however). That will give more clearance of the b string.
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Offline stitch101

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #23 on: October 16, 2013, 10:19:17 pm »
The first shape is the E shape in the caged system which also is the mini bare shape so you should learn
it with the mini barre index finger because your going to have learn to sooner or later and there's no
time like the present. Try barring the first 3 strings instead of just the first 2. This will bring your hand
up high and help miss the third string with your middle finger








Offline lugnut

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Re: IM-151 • Triad Chord Grips
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2014, 03:07:14 pm »
Triad shape 1 is a killer for me.  Either I can't barre the B/E strings well or my 2nd finger ends up touching the B string.  Ughh… this isn't easy.  The other shapes will take more time to get quick but at least mechanically they seem manageable.  Great lesson/drills to really learn all the notes on the neck for sure!

 

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