Author Topic: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4  (Read 12017 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« on: December 03, 2010, 03:00:11 pm »
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 04:58:49 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline sophiehiker

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2011, 06:33:30 pm »

The goals say, "Play the muted backbeat rhythm click in at least 4 rhythm patterns and be able to apply it to at least 4 songs."

I can only think of two songs: "Save Tonight - Eagle Eye Cherry" and "In the Cold, Cold Night - Red Stripes".  Anyone suggest any others?
...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

Offline Shu

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2011, 01:34:17 pm »
Try some Jack johnson songs like Sitting waiting wishing.  :) America - Horse with no name also sounds great with that.

Offline AaronP

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2011, 08:42:52 pm »
I find when I play a rhythm pattern with the snare drum technique that my bottom E string can get very out of tune, sometimes by more than a quarter of a tone. It might take me playing through Justin's version of Coffee and TV right through, for example, before it gets out of tune. Am I putting my right hand down too hard?
Thanks Justin, if you see this. The intermediate course is really really helpful and I can't wait to get onto the style modules.

Diesel McGunner

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2011, 11:13:33 pm »
Hey, I was wondering of this is an accoustic guitar only technique because I tried it on my strat and the first part doesn't work on it's own making me think that the whole thing probably won't either. I mean when you hit the strings with your hand only, not the pick just the first part with your palm, it doesn't make a noise for me on an electric.

Offline mouser9169

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2011, 12:59:27 am »
The technique is a little different on an electric but the same idea. You hit the strings with the "heel" of your hand (outside edge from the pinky down) as you drag the pick across - kind of like a "throwing a Frisbee" motion. One of the first few lessons in the Easy Songs for Beginners (check my post in Tips and Tricks) goes over both techniques and the differences very well.

It takes a while to get it to work consistently, but keep at it. If at any point while you're practicing you think "Hey, that sounded like Dave Matthews", then you are indeed on the right track :D
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 08:04:14 am by close2u »
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Offline Porpoise

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2012, 08:13:13 pm »
The technique is a little different on an electric but the same idea. You hit the strings with the "heel" of your hand (outside edge from the pinky down) as you drag the pick across - kind of like a "throwing a Frisbee" motion. One of the first few lessons in the Easy Songs for Beginners (check my post in Tips and Tricks) goes over both techniques and the differences very well.

It takes a while to get it to work consistently, but keep at it. If at any point while you're practicing you think "Hey, that sounded like Dave Matthews", then you are indeed on the right track :D

Can you tell me which post you are refering to?
I also wonder which muting techniques are used for open strings..for instance, in this Jack Johnson video on 00:28 , he seems to do a little trick with his fretting hand: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P54ybJ0pX9g

Offline jcurr16

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2013, 06:24:33 pm »
Hi Guys,
I'm having a hard time getting the percussive hit.. I really have to smack my guitar to get it. I think my action is too hit at the bottom end of my fret board.. about 3/16". I've done some research and it says that most manufacturers set it up around 3/32". However at the top end of my neck the action seems to be fine. So is this a case of me needing to adjust the truss rod? or can I simply lower the action from the saddle?
Thanks!

Offline misterg

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2013, 03:09:56 pm »
There isn't a simple answer to that -

First, I guess the 3/32" would be measued at the 12th fret - that's less than 2.5mm, which I think would be a pretty low action for an acoustic. You're 3/16" at the end of the fretboard (?) might be a tad high, but I would be surprised if it was your problem. I made a printable action gauge here.

2nd, the truss rod adjusts the neck relief, and while this does affect the action, you shouldn't adjust the truss rod on the basis of action.

I think it often happens that guitar necks move a little as the weather changes (mainly season to season, not so much day to day), and it's possible your truss rod might need adjustment, though.

Check your neck relief, and if it seems high, then there's nothing to lose by tightening your trussrod slightly (1/8 - 1/4 turn) and seeing what effect this has. If the guitar strings start buzzing when you play notes in the ~5th - 9th fret area, then you have gone too far, and you should undo the change. It may take a little time for the full effect of the change to come through (some of my guitars respond instantly, and that's it, others seem to keep moving for a day, or so).

If the neck relief is as low as it can be and have the guitar still playable, and the action is still too high, then, yes, you would need to adjust it at the nut. Get the neck relief right first, though.

...but I still doubt that it's your problem here - have you checked where your hand is hitting the strings? it needs to be quite far from the bridge.

Offline lastnightilie

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2014, 02:37:52 am »
I have a question about the technique of this. Is it definitely better to mute with the right hand? I've always found that easier, but when I was taking guitar lessons a while back my teacher told me the correct thing to do is mute with your left hand by maintaining the chord but sort of relaxing your fingers over the strings, because your strumming hand should basically always be in motion to keep the beat. So, for example, if you're playing an open G chord, you'd loosen your ring finger to mute the first string and then lay your first and second fingers along the other strings to mute them.

And for what it's worth I just looked up videos of songs from two different artists I really like that I know use this "percussive hit" sound, and they are both clearly using this left hand muting technique and keeping their right hand in constant motion. Both songs are played with open C and G chords.

Like I said, I find the right hand way easier, but if keeping your hand in motion is useful I would like to practice and master the other method.

Thoughts?

Offline mike42

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2014, 03:52:04 am »
Both left and right hand muting have their benefits, and I wouldn't say that one is better than the other. There will be times when you'll want to use one over the other, but I think it's more of a situational thing.

It's common to use a combination of the two techniques, especially when things get more complex.

I'm not sure if I'm correctly interpreting your meaning of the 'percussive hit'. I usually think of that as one strong hit on the strings where your right palm contacts the string just before the pick so they're muted. I know Justin mentions it in a lesson somewhere but I can't remember where I saw it.

I assume you're talking about funk style strumming where you relax your hand to get that percussive sound while maintaining your rhythm. That's going to be mostly left hand for the reason you've mentioned.

Offline lastnightilie

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2014, 11:17:43 pm »
It's the lesson that goes with this topic. He also calls it a snare sound and accented muted hit? I think you're thinking of the right thing though.

Can you name specific times when one technique would be better or is it just something you have to gain an instinct for?

Offline mike42

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2014, 11:52:42 pm »
Hi lastnightilie-

Sorry about the delayed response. I haven't had any internet access for a few days.

Left hand muting tends to be more suited to a lot of funk style strumming where you are going for that "chicka chicka" sound in between strums.

Right hand muting can be used in a lot of different situations, really whenever you want to get that percussive "snare" sound.

But overall it's going to come down to experience and trying different things. You can get a lot of varied sounds using left or right hand muting, or a combination of both. So start trying to incorporate them into your playing and just remember that 'if it sounds good, it is good'.

Hope this helps! 


Offline 15learningLate

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2018, 01:32:50 am »
Hello,

I've got the "chop" percussive technique down pat.

However I have a small cut that seems to be forming a callus.  It is located on the lowest part of the outer palm on the bone just above the crease of the wrist.  Am I doing something Wrong?  A suggestion?

The post is not allowing me to post the link to the picture so let me try to fool it as follows.  Connect all the lines that following with no spaces. 
Thanks.

https
:
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/
photos.app.
goo.gl
/yeiryigNJCjewtAx7

Offline WhereTheStreetsHaveNoName

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2020, 10:19:08 am »
Good day folks

How to hold the pick properly during palm muting?
I always end up hitting my Index finger on the down movement, if i am muting with my palms.

I checked out lesson BC - 192, but perhaps missed the trick.

Any pointer to right technique on it?
I can keep improvising until i land by on the right way, but just wanted to be sure i didn't miss any advice on it.

Thanks in advance


Offline jono

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Re: IM-145 • Intermediate Rhythm Guitar 4
« Reply #15 on: March 29, 2020, 02:54:30 pm »
I dont really understand what you are doing. You should be holding the pick normally and muting with the edge of your hand. What are you hitting with your index finger.
A picture would help.

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