Author Topic: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1  (Read 49796 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hefty Man John

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 268
  • Good Vibes 4
  • I have a love/hate relationship with guitar
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2011, 05:01:27 pm »
Can you please tell me why it is important to learn all 5 positions of the major scale? If I know one, can't I just make solos using that all across the fretboard? Thanks :)
Davey Baby :)

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14399
  • Good Vibes 638
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2011, 05:51:41 pm »
@ hefty

no - because if you move the shape up or down you are playing different notes = different scale = different key

the shape is not moveable ... except where it repeats 12 frets (one octave) higher

but the same notes do appear all over the guitar ... but in different relative positions to each other ... so you need five shapes / patterns

learn where the Root notes are in the first shape

now locate the same note all over the neck ... different places on different strings yes?

 :)

Offline TB-AV

  • Honorable Ex-Mod
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 12698
  • Good Vibes 331
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2011, 06:25:19 pm »
Quote
Can you please tell me why it is important to learn all 5 positions of the major scale? If I know one, can't I just make solos using that all across the fretboard? Thanks

Yes but the five positions cover the entire neck ( every note ). If you only learned one of the five positions, your scale would confined to only 4 or 5 frets.

What many people do that want to learn one scale is to learn an extended scale that spans say 10 frets which then covers most of the neck. Even that can be problem though. Let's say you learn a 10fret scale and you decide to play in F. Well that's fine. You only go from fret 1 to fret 10. But now let's say you want to play in Bb. that goes from fret 6 up through fret 16 and some guitar necks don;t allow access up that high.

So it's back to the 5 shapes. That way you can always find one that allows you play in a comfortable spot on the neck. Not only that but the shapes are actually your chords ( sort of in disguise ). It's always nice to know where your chords are if you decide to play rhythm  ;)
Gone

Offline Bootstrap

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1875
  • Good Vibes 65
  • Never yield.
    • The Tale Of Bootstrap
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2011, 10:43:32 pm »
Hefty - technically yes - but what that means in practice is you can only play a solo in one spot (mostly*) on the fretboard per key. So anything you play in G would be centered around the root at the 3rd fret, anything in C around the 8th etc.... That would be really limiting if say you were playing in A and wanted to really tear out a really hot solo down the screechy end.

Learning 5 positions allows you to solo anywhere on the neck in any key.

*Ok the pattern does repeat after 12 frets, but for a lot of keys this is impractical.
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

tober

  • Guest
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2011, 03:29:29 am »
When I play the Major scale exercise, I am having trouble playing on the tip of my pinkie (Justin says we should play with our fingertips). I don't get as much reach when I play on the tip, and it's less accurate than playing slightly on the side because the tip is a smaller area. When I do play slightly on the side of my pinkie, I am still keeping my finger curved, not flattened. I have been playing the scale for about a month now and am otherwise ready to move on to the next level of exercises. Am I being too nit-picky about this? Is it okay to play slightly on the side of my pinkie?

swame_sp

  • Guest
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #30 on: January 30, 2012, 04:04:39 am »
Hello,

I started this lesson today, I have a question on the finger placement.
Can I have 2 or 3rd fingers on the strings in their respective position while playing with 3/4th fingers strings or is it recommended to take them off the string?

Please advise.

Offline misterg

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2437
  • Good Vibes 125
  • Wales, UK
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2012, 05:35:12 pm »
I think you should take them off if you're not playing that note. Try and hold them in position 'hovering' above the correct place if you can.

Andy

uncle harry

  • Guest
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2012, 08:25:28 pm »


I'm on about stage 4 of the intermediate course, and it's taken me ages to work through it (> 1 year) because I keep branching off to do other things, and despite best intentions, I only end up working properly on one of them. YMMV :)

This was a relief reading this !! its taking me ages to get through this as well and I seem to be endlessly going back on stuff I have already done , It seems to go downhill for a while then I   crash into a brick wall , does this stuff ever get easier ???

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3400
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2012, 09:32:52 pm »
Order is good, structure is good.  All for them.  But first and foremost playing music is supposed to be FUN.  I think that's why they call it playing.

So by all means follow the course that is a GREAT idea.  But remember to have fun.  And if having fun is learning the pentatonic and or blues scales so you can just PLAY, then set aside some do whatever you want time in your practice schedule. 

What you don't want to do is get so wrapped up in doing this thing that you burn yourself out and start "not playing".  Jamming around for an hour when you were supposed to be working on a particular lesson is a hell of a lot better than not picking up the guitar.

Sometimes its okay to eat dessert first.  Just don't do it all the time.  It's about balance and moderation says the guy who lacks focus.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5465
  • Good Vibes 250
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2012, 11:53:24 pm »
Learning the major scale will teach you the most and make it so much easier to learn and understand the other scales and modes.

I agree with Shadow the minor pent is more fun and easier to master but if you master the major scale you have already mastered the
major pent. minor scale, minor pent and all the modes.

I see so many guitarist stuck in a rut because they never bothered to learn the major scale. As for having fun playing I'm all for it, that's
why we play guitar in the first play. You will have more fun playing if you under stand what it is your playing.

Here's a fairly easy song/solo in the key of G major to get you started.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwprrAEL9-E&feature=related

Offline Skylander

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #35 on: July 19, 2012, 06:06:51 am »
When i play the scale going up(towards the ground), should i keep my fingers pressing the notes i played before when playing other notes on the same string?
Like in the A string, should i keep figer 1 pressed while i play the note on finger 2? An likewise while I put finger 4 in position, should i keep fingers 1 and 2 on the string?
Whatever the answer is, why?

Sorry if i made de question confusing.
Thankyou.
 :)

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14399
  • Good Vibes 638
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #36 on: July 19, 2012, 06:42:54 am »
... in the A string, should i keep finger 1 pressed while i play the note on finger 2?

Yes.

Quote
... while I put finger 4 in position, should i keep fingers 1 and 2 on the string?

1 ... no need ... get it ready to move strings
2 ... yes


reasons ... you will hear the open string if you lift all fingers

Offline jacksroadhouse

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1613
  • Good Vibes 48
    • Acoustic Passion Blog
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2012, 08:06:02 am »
Just to clarify: once you fretted the next note, you can lift the finger from the previdous note (it's gonna be needed somewhere else in a moment). You don't keep two notes fretted on the same string all the time, at least not when you're playing scales in one direction. But that only matters when you're playing very slowly, played fast it just becomes one steady motion.

And something for "further down the road": this goes for playing scales legato (when the notes are connected with each other, the next note smoothly replaces the one before). When you're playing scales staccato (each note ends before the next one is played), you'd usually lift the finger before to stop the string ringing. But to not let the open string ring instead is a bit tricky, hence "further down the road" ;)

ducky

  • Guest
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #38 on: August 19, 2012, 06:46:12 pm »
Hey there Justin. Props to you for such an amazing gift to us aspiring guitarists ;-)

I noticed that your wrist bends quite a lot in order to reach the low E string. Won't that be harmful to the wrist?? My wrist was aching after a day of practising. I'm pretty sure the wrist should be straight as far as possible to avoid tension and, more significantly, carpal tunnel syndrome in the long run.

Would it be advisable to fret the notes with flatter fingers to maintain good finger reach without bending the wrist too much? I'm also considering playing with the guitar neck angled towards the ceiling.

Thanks

Offline justinguitar

  • Administrator
  • Stadium Superstar
  • *****
  • Posts: 3447
  • Good Vibes 163
    • justinguitar.com
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2012, 07:12:46 pm »
you have to find the balance - cos my little finger is so short I have t play with my wrist bent a little more ideal sometimes...  it's important to make sure you get a good note (positive finger placement), but also you don't want to get carpel tunnel or similar horrible things...

"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline eggybaby

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 29
  • Good Vibes 2
  • I like the rock-n-roll!
Re: IM-113 • down-up-down-up alt. picking
« Reply #40 on: February 20, 2013, 05:48:58 pm »
Hi,
Justin recommends alt. picking dudududu...starting on the low-root note.
When making the jump from  5th string to 4th string, you've just 'down-picked' the 5th string.
Thus, you are in position to simply continue a 'down-pick' on the 4th string.

Why 'up-pick' the 4th string (in keeping with the pattern) if your momentum would steer one to 'down-pick' it? (i'm sure there's a good reason, just like to know what it is)

Also, if later in my guitar-journey I start the scale on the 2nd octave (4thString/5thFret - G); should i get in the habit of starting with an 'up-pick' - since that is the position when doing both octaves (as in the video)?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2013, 06:10:04 pm by eggybaby »
"All this machinery making moderm music can still be open-hearted"
Hears Me:
https://soundcloud.com/eggybaby

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3400
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #41 on: February 20, 2013, 06:03:06 pm »
In brief, to maintain rhythm.

As you progress and get more advanced you can start looking at 'sweep' or 'economy' picking.

Forum searches on alternate, sweep, and economy picking should yield pages on the subject.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline misterg

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2437
  • Good Vibes 125
  • Wales, UK
Re: IM-113 • down-up-down-up alt. picking
« Reply #42 on: February 20, 2013, 06:32:17 pm »
As Shadow said, it is to maintain rhythm, and it's actually easier to play more quickly because you don't need to make any decisions.

Also, if later in my guitar-journey I start the scale on the 2nd octave (4thString/5thFret - G); should i get in the habit of starting with an 'up-pick'

No. The ups and downs are set by the rhythm of the music - pick down on the first beat of the bar 99.99% of the time.

Offline Smith

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 29
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2013, 11:59:39 am »
I'm having a little trouble with the alt picking of this scale. For some reason I find it a bit of a tongue twister for my picking hand because there's 3 notes on some strings & 2 on others. It feels weird because I'm not starting with a down pick when I'm at the third fret on all strings. The frustrating thing is that I know it's a down pick on the root note then up down up down, simple...yet not for me at least.

Offline sophiehiker

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1137
  • Good Vibes 34
  • Salida, Colorado USA
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2013, 01:00:01 pm »
I found it useful to say out loud, "Down, Up, Down, Up...", while picking the scale.  After the 10,000 time you'll know which string is an up pick and which is down pick at the third fret.   ;D
...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

Offline Smith

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 29
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #45 on: September 25, 2013, 03:32:49 pm »
Just to confirm...I'm stopping on the root note on the first string unless I'm playing up & then down the scale without stopping, I also include the F# on the sixth string?

Offline sophiehiker

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1137
  • Good Vibes 34
  • Salida, Colorado USA
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #46 on: September 25, 2013, 03:57:54 pm »
You want to practice the scale both up (in pitch) and down (in pitch).  Not stopping on the 1st string.

So, you would start at the 6th string, 3rd fret and end in the same place.  You'd play the A on the 1st string. and the F# on the 6th string to return to the root note on the 6th string.  You're playing all the note in the shape.

Of course, you don't just play it up and down once, but keep going.  You always start and stop at the 6th string, 3rd fret.

HTH
...where the deer and the antelope play.  Well, they're not really playing.  They're fleeing in terror.

Offline bradt

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1809
  • Good Vibes 66
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #47 on: September 25, 2013, 04:59:59 pm »
Smith, it depends on what you are practicing. For memorizing the notes on the scale you will cycle it where you don't stop on the root. Generally though in daily practice you want to stop on the root. What I do is every time I come to the root I play a full bar of it and then start the scale again.

The reason is that you want to start associating the sound of the scale with the root note.

You're probably learning the G major scale right now which has the notes G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G. Now, the C major scale also has all of those same notes except it replaces the F# with just a plain F (and the root and octave are C obviously), so the two scales are very similar. When you are practicing them, it helps immensely to pay attention to the roots and the starting points. Even though they are mostly the same notes, the scales take on a different flavor depending on the root.

Offline Smith

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 29
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #48 on: September 25, 2013, 08:18:39 pm »
I'm memorising the scale right now & trying to play it as smooth as possible. I guess it's not a bad thing to start looking at how scales work in relation to each other.

Offline lurch

  • Bedroom Rocker
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #49 on: January 15, 2014, 09:42:47 pm »
Just started this, doing it slowly, it's amazing how even though I didn't know the E shape major scale before, how my fingers want to do 1,2,4 on the 2nd (B) string. Managed to beat them out of it within 2 mini sessions.

Question about the 5 minute thing... Should I aim to practice for 5 minutes and then take a break, or it wants to be a minimum of 5 minutes? 5 minutes didn't seem like enough last time, and I ended up doing 9 as it felt right (today anyway).

Not sure if I should be doing this yes. I'm technically on the beginners course stage 1. It's not that I don't know the chords associated with further and higher stages in the course, I do, but I learned badly a ing time ago, and I'm trying to drill myself with the stuff I should have known, and the stuff I really should have practiced way back when. I'm selecting bits and pieces mainly to break up the course a little. E-A-D 1 minute changes gets a little numbing without some gaps in between of something else. Have a new Uke for a bit of extra fun if I want to kick back :)

Cheers

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App