Author Topic: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1  (Read 49645 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« on: December 03, 2010, 11:44:32 am »
Questions...
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline icedfiend

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2010, 12:18:03 am »
I started learning Major scale with the "Master The Major Scale" DVD (so far I've got down to position 2). While watching this lesson I played this first position slowly. Suddenly I noticed that when landing on the root note at the first string I was doing always an up pick instead of a down pick... The problem was that while going from 5th string (note D) to 4th string (note E) I was doing 2 down pics instead of a down pick and up pick... it looks like my hand found it more natural going that way than the regular alternate picking pattern.

Is this a really bad habit that should be corrected or is it ok to do it like that?

Thanks for the help!

Keep up the great work Justin!

flyhead

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2010, 09:01:59 am »
After you have learnt to alternate pick flawlessly you can choose to play things as you wish, but it is important to master perfect technique before doing so. I would suggest that you correct this reflex before it becomes an encumbrance.

jgette90

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2010, 03:26:25 pm »
"The Major Scale has seven notes (plus the octave in practice), which in solfege are the syllables: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti and Do"

So, in G major position, why the seventh note, which is supposed to be an F, is at the fourth fret of the fourth string and not at the third fret, like it is in theory?

Offline TB-AV

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2010, 08:45:12 pm »
F# -- 4th fret is F#

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Offline Bootstrap

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 09:06:37 pm »
F# -- 4th fret is F#

To elaborate - the key of G contains 1 x # - an F#.

Each fret on your guitar = 1 semitone

The formula for any key commencing from the root note is Tone, Tone, Semitone, Tone, Tone, Tone, Semitone.

So the distance between Mi & Fa and Ti & Do is just one fret ie half the distance between the other notes.
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Offline justinguitar

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 09:50:52 pm »
After you have learnt to alternate pick flawlessly you can choose to play things as you wish, but it is important to master perfect technique before doing so. I would suggest that you correct this reflex before it becomes an encumbrance.

yep.

make sure you get it with the correct picking. very important!
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Makalol

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2010, 11:45:15 am »
Hi there!

Just began with the Intermediate Foundation DVD and started learning this scale, but I have a weird "problem":

If I play this scale very slowly (actually this is true for almost everything that I do on the guitar) , I just can't do it right, I do mistakes all the time.
Playing this a little bit faster, like 80 bpm or more, is no problem. Anything below that, 40, 50, 60 are a pain in the a... it's even worse then trying to play this as fast as I can.

I'm also doing the Minimum Movement exercise at the same time while playing the scale (I realized that your fingers are flying in the video, Justin! :D) and also try to get it cycled four times. Doing it one time is not a big problem, at least not on the way down the scale.

It seems that I can't concentrate on the scale and my mind drifts to other things, like what I want to eat that day, when playing it very slow. Oh and I'm not a fast player (like those Metal and shred guys) by any means and don't even intend on going that fast, I just want to get my playing as smooth and accurate as possible. I can already play a few things but every now and then I realize that I do mistakes sometimes and that it more depends on chance then my playing "skill", which results in frustration because I feel like I've learned nothing (perfectly) so far.

Thanks for the great lessons, they are a big help!

PS: Maybe I should add that I play since ~ 8 months and started with the Beginner's Course and after that I just learned some songs or riffs etc (mostly Red Hot Chili Peppers). My chord playing is actually very solid in my opinion, never had problems with any Barré chord and so on, but playing riffs isn't as perfect as I want it to be. Even with stuff that I know since a few months I still do some mistakes, depending on the day. There are days where it really grooves and I feel very happy and "relieved" after playing (the majority, like 5-6 days a week) and the other day(s) my playing just sucks, which is normal as far as I know and everybody has that, but these days occur every week or two....

Offline justinguitar

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2010, 12:32:04 pm »
Not sure why you might have the play slow problem, but being able to do it slow is real mportant so I guess you just have to keep practicing it!
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2011, 08:13:30 pm »
bwets - that is right. except u miss out finger 4 on 1st string when going down.


And put it in going up! (which is probably a moot point) - for clarity sake, you only play it once - whether you consider that is going up or going down is up to you. FWIW I always thing of it as the end of the down.
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alexmdac

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2011, 06:06:50 am »
Is there a recommended place to put your thumb on the back of the neck when playing the scale?

Offline justinguitar

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2011, 11:16:56 pm »
@alexmdac between the centre and top of the neck - wherever it feels good.

Lesson Link: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/IM-113-MajorScalePos1.php
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 05:09:36 pm by justinguitar »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

LESbum

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2011, 10:12:24 pm »
My pick keeps hitting the wrong strings when I play scales.  Are there any exercises to improve picking precision?

flyhead

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2011, 10:21:49 pm »
Play sloooooooooooooowly.

Offline TB-AV

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2011, 12:12:41 am »
Try to forget about what you intend to accomplish and concentrate on what you know to be the correct thing to do. Don't go any faster than you can do so cleanly.

"Slow is smooth, smooth is fast"

"Amateurs practice until they get it right. Professionals practice until they can't get it wrong."

If you keep hitting the wrong strings your motions are too large. Try some string skipping exercises. That will help you get your hand to go to the correct location to pick the string. Your hand is constantly aligning with various strings, that needs to be worked on -a lot-.








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MrFaulconbridge

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2011, 02:38:54 am »
I am into alot of modern fingerstyle (guys like andy mckee ect) and they never seem to have a song in standard tuning, is this going to be a problem for me? Scales will have to be relearned for every new tuning I use!!

Infact, the whole alternate tuning thing seems to confuse me with music theory. Even reading music will be much harder. I would like to know justins thoughts or anyone else on alternate tunings and music theory. Thankyou!

Transcribing songs in alternate tunings might confuse my ear with the frets aswell!

Offline close2u

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2011, 07:05:43 am »
Give Andy McKee a guitar in standard tuning and I think he could play you a major scale in the first position without thinking

you've gotta start somewhere

 :)

Alternate tunings are a different avenue in your playing journey ... but it still relies on major scale theory

Offline bunnahowen

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Re: lesson pdf
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2011, 07:53:59 pm »
Regarding the lesson on the G major scale. Can anyone explain the two extra notes on the tab or so it appears to me. An F # on the 6th and an A flat on the first. thanks for any help.

Offline misterg

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Re: lesson pdf
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2011, 10:37:05 pm »
Regarding the lesson on the G major scale. Can anyone explain the two extra notes on the tab or so it appears to me. An F # on the 6th and an A flat on the first. thanks for any help.

Hi,

The 'extra' notes are just to continue the scale to the highest and lowest possible notes in this position. You should always start and stop on the root note (G - 3rd fret 6th string) - at the end of the scale play down through the G to the F#, then back to the G before stopping.

The note on the 1st string is an A (5th fret) - G Major has only one sharp(#) and that's an F# - all the other notes are 'natural'.

---following info no longer up to date due to merge of thread --

You may not have realised that there is a thread dedicated to questions on this lesson: Here
...and each of the IM lessons.... Here (You might have to go to one of the other pages to find the lesson you want.)

HTH

Andy
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 12:10:05 am by LievenDV »

Offline bunnahowen

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2011, 12:36:37 am »
Been back to have another look at this lesson. I can see Justin plays the two extra notes but guess I would like to know why as the scale seems to work without them. The scale starts on G and ends on G doesn,t it? So why the extra F sharp and A. Confused. Any clarification appreciated.

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2011, 01:07:18 am »
Bun - couple of reasons.

Strictly speaking to play a scale you would only play one octave - yet in these exercises we play through several - the idea of these positions/patterns is to get you used to all of the notes that are available to play in any particular scale and in any particular position. That way when you are blasting out your solo and improvising you hopefully wont hit a bum note.

One other advantage, as you listen you will hear how the scale resolves around the tonal centre (root note) of the scale as you pass through the root and back. This is an important concept to get your ears around.
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Offline misterg

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2011, 01:21:06 am »
Been back to have another look at this lesson. I can see Justin plays the two extra notes but guess I would like to know why as the scale seems to work without them. The scale starts on G and ends on G doesn,t it? So why the extra F sharp and A. Confused. Any clarification appreciated.


OK, you're correct about the scale starting and ending on G, but I suppose what we're being taught is to be able to play *all* the notes in the G major scale that are accessible in that position, even the ones which run into the next octave of the scale. This means that if we learn the next position(s) in the same manner the 'extra' notes the start and end of each position join together so there will not be a 'gap' between the positions. Once we know all 5 positions they join to form one huge G major scale that covers the whole neck without any gaps.

Let me know if this doesn't clear the confusion, and I'll give someone else a chance to answer :)

(Oh, I see Bootstrap has got there before me ....)
Andy

bullzeye26

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2011, 03:24:34 pm »
I really like to play fingerstyle on the guitar and I don't use a pick very often. When I practice the major scale, is it important for me to use my thumb on the bass strings and my fingers on the other strings (right hand)?? This doesn't feel very natural...

 

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2011, 03:41:53 pm »
It probably isn't that crucial for playing the major scale, but it is the norm to play strings 6, 5, & 4 with your thumb and 3, 2 & 1 with fingers 1, 2 & 3.
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Night Guitarist

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Re: IM-113 • Major Scale Position 1
« Reply #24 on: June 18, 2011, 09:32:57 pm »
can i apply the do it 4times without mistakes before moving up the metronome for stage 8 on beginers course minor penatonic scale?

 

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