Author Topic: Singing 101  (Read 60959 times)

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Paladin117

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2010, 08:17:34 am »
I can only speak for myself, but I learn by listening to a section and then trying to repeat it. It's rare if ever that i'll play along to the original track if i'm trying to learn it.

What the xx--xx? Are you for real? What do you do after you learn it, then? Just play it by yourself? How the xx--xx can you even play guitar without playing along with records. I seriously cannot even comprehend what you're telling me.

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Call it what you will, it amounts to a lot of time put in productively honing an ability.

Yeah.

flyhead

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #26 on: November 17, 2010, 09:01:59 am »
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What the xx--xx? Are you for real? ( ) I seriously cannot even comprehend what you're telling me.
He probably isn't for real, and it's your inner thoughts that are confusing you. In fact, this comment is merely a projection of your inner reasoning responding to your inquiry.

Offline Tourniquet

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #27 on: November 17, 2010, 10:27:53 am »
What do you do after you learn it, then? Just play it by yourself?

Nope. I play it..... and sing it. A chord progression on the guitar can quickly get monotonous, throw vocals on top and it never gets dull.

How can you even play guitar without playing along with records.


If I really want to play along with a song I'll find, or more often make, a backing track.
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Paladin117

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #28 on: November 17, 2010, 07:40:59 pm »
A chord progression on the guitar can quickly get monotonous, throw vocals on top and it never gets dull.

So what, you only play open chord strumming songs? I guess that makes sense. The music I play would not sound that cool with just a guitar.

Offline Tourniquet

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2010, 08:51:18 pm »
Open or barre chords, strumming or fingerstyle.... rhythm at any rate. Playing lead and singing at the same time is a pretty rare field that seems mostly limited to a call and response style (playing lead fills between the vocal lines)

The music I play would not sound that cool with just a guitar.

Not the sort to do an "Unplugged" album eh ;)
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gryan

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #30 on: November 18, 2010, 01:01:01 am »
I sound like a chronic chain-smoker with throat cancer gargling razor blades and screaming cats. On a good day.

Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2011, 06:49:18 pm »
So how does one find a good instructor? 

I have a pleasant enough voice but no technique at all.  In fact, I have a habit of breathiness that I feel needs to go the way of the dodo.   I like to sing, but my particularly peculiar background is that I have not sung for most of my life and am only starting now.  There is a lot of stuff attending the stuffing of one's musicality for twenty five years and it can be overwhelming.  I feel like I'm opening Pandora's box sometimes. 
I guess results are everything but I am wary of a bad instructor screwing up an already inhibited voice.  I almost wish I could sing like Patty Smith but that's not me.  I have a feeling I am going to end up the route of Joan Baez but who knows.  How do you find someone to help you figure it out?

PTB

Realism is relative.

Asjh89

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2011, 10:47:05 am »
No clue, I wound up with a great one last year but incidentally. Maybe work on doing covers for a bit and when you're more comfortable with your voice find an instructor, that way you won't get discouraged by a bad one steering you in circles.

To start with some sense of order just pick out an easy song, listen to it and sing it for a good hour every day.
Sing with the track, sing without it, listen without singing.
When you got it good, move onto the next one (etc)...
Keep refreshed on the old stuff too.

You can get pretty far that way, and won't need a teacher for awhile. If you go to find one you'll have a better idea of what you're looking for.

Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2011, 11:01:24 am »
I decided to take a lesson with the singing teacher at my guitar store.   I'm going back today for what is really a first session after getting lost and only having ten minutes with her last time.  But in that ten minutes she took the song I wrote and started to polish the thing immediately, finding the notes I had been looking for and using a variety of tempos. Her musicality is pretty fluid, that's for sure.  She is the founder of a choir as well, so that will be interesting. 

I was unusually nervous too, but what I do with nerves is note them and then ignore them.  I figure they will eventually disappear but they aren't going to stop me from anything I want to do.
As for singing alot, I already do that.  With and without music.  But when I record it, I still sound like a kid.  I think the breathiness is not having a range opened up because when I find something in just the right key, I don't sound like Marilyn Monroe singing Happy Birthday to Jack Kennedy any more.  And not having sung for so long,I don't actually have any habits that are deeply ingrained.    Good or bad.   So I am optimistic. 
Realism is relative.

Asjh89

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2011, 04:21:50 pm »
Sounds good, hope that teacher works out for you

Offline Toad

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2011, 03:10:23 am »
I have a question.  I just started singing with the mic on and hearing my voice through headphones.  I've noticed I have to readjust my voice to make it a little higher because when I sing in my head it sounds pretty high already.  So when I sing with the mic on, I can hear it and adjust it accordingly, but what if I'm just singing in a room without a mic?  How would I adjust my sound without being able to hear my voice?  Because after I readjust it, it sounds horrible in my head (but good in the mic). lol 

Another question, after readjusting my voice, I noticed that I'm using more of the bottom part of my throat.  The part right above where teh collar bones meet.  I find it doesn't really feel natural, will I get used to it?  ( I used to use both the upper and lower throat evenly when singing)

Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2011, 09:08:57 am »
I have a question.  I just started singing with the mic on and hearing my voice through headphones.  I've noticed I have to readjust my voice to make it a little higher because when I sing in my head it sounds pretty high already.  So when I sing with the mic on, I can hear it and adjust it accordingly, but what if I'm just singing in a room without a mic?  How would I adjust my sound without being able to hear my voice?  Because after I readjust it, it sounds horrible in my head (but good in the mic). lol 


What do you mean by "higher"  It sounds like you're saying you're off key when you sing? 
Realism is relative.

Offline Toad

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2011, 09:07:28 pm »
I meant singing in a higher tone.  Not low...but more airy and light.  I am in key though.

I basically sing softer.  With less strong vibrations in the upper part of my throat and more soft vibrations in the bottom of my throat.  I can feel my muscle in right above where my collarbones connect working.

Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2011, 02:57:53 am »
I've taken four singing lessons so far and I have to say they have been amazing.   My instructor is slow and steady, teaching one new concept at a time for a few minutes and ending with about ten minutes of just singing a song.  She took the song I wrote and played piano for me so that I could do some work on it and when I listen to the recordings of these sessions the progress is scary.  Not that I am there yet but she says that I'm only hearing thirty percent of what I can do and while it sounds peculiar in my head it sound like "singing" when I listen to it.

For me the in person interaction with another musician is very important.   I want to encourage Toad and others who "can't sing" to say "I believe it I believe it and I know I will achieve it."  Or something like that.  And take a lesson.

I got lucky with this singing whom I found through my guitar store (where I also take lessons), but I took a chance and if she wasn't right, I would have moved on.  Like I did from the choir who auditioned me over the telephone and then ended up with a songbook that included Java Jive and Dancing in the Streets.... not for me.

Try it, you might find out something about yourself that you will enjoy knowing.   

Pat
Realism is relative.

Offline Toad

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2011, 06:44:26 am »
Pat, I would love to hear your singing!  Record yourself and let us hear.  Promise I won't criticize, I have no right to criticize lol...

Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2011, 07:29:58 am »
I thought it would be fun to put together a little "reel" of the process in a few weeks.  So you can hear a little bit of the change.  Not that there is a lot of it yet... Hang  in there another week at least. Let's see what I've got by next Monday...

Pat
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Offline PattheBunny

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #41 on: March 16, 2011, 04:24:31 am »
I am working on getting something to record with, but my computer is not entirely cooperating.  I just wanted to share this becuz, well becuz it's a little scary.  This week I was able to sing pretty much an octave higher than ever before.  It's not perfect, but my voice isn't cracking like it was.  And I am able to place it consistently.  And then my teacher keeps saying these godawful things that are half exciting and half terrifying.  That I'm going to be a real singer.  That I'm going to have a big voice.  That I'm going to have a bigger voice than her (as if that were possible).  I had not a single idea that any of this would happen when I took that first lesson or that I would be able to sing what I'm singing now.  I don't even like the material very much (Hallelujah right now).  I am worried that I will sound operatic.  Yikes.  And what's really interesting is that psychologically singing is like seeing clearly, your world suddenly gets a little larger.  Or more yours or something.   

What I want to say is that I recommend everyone take a few singing lessons with a vocal coach.  Really you have no idea what may be possible.   Heck, I have no idea what is possible.  Next week I may become a frog.    More importantly, your voice is your unique expression and well, that's what you're here for.  To express your uniqueness.
Go for it.

PTB
Pat
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CiX

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #42 on: July 09, 2012, 12:17:49 pm »
Sorry for the necro but seemed like a good topic.

Anyway I've been trying to sing along with songs. Its been a long time since I last sung maybe 28years since I was in a choir and that was prolly b4 my nuts dropped. LOL.

Anyway.

I always find myself trying to sing in what I would probably say was falsetto at high points in song to match well especially female singers, Which is great except its certainly not my cup of tea. Even when forcing myself to sing lower I will get to a part that will force me back into the higher register. I'm prolly talking rubbish here but thought I would at least ask the question.

Also are there any trips to prevent mumbling which is what I also am guilty of at times?

LOL

Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #43 on: July 09, 2012, 12:47:20 pm »
Not a big singer myself, but fwiw: sounds like you're simply out of your vocal range (low=too low, high=too high?). Try a different key. From a female voice, try 5 or 7 semitones dpwn, that might work better.

Offline Tourniquet

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #44 on: July 09, 2012, 09:32:47 pm »
Ideally you want to try and develop all of your registers so that they overlap  and then blend seamlessly into eachother. find the effective edge of each register and slowly try to push it further without switching.
once there's an overlap of at least a few notes try to bring elements of both of them in at the same time, keep working at that until it's a seamless transition.

try to figure out why you jump to falsetto, when it comes to that particular part slow down and take it one note at a time. slowly and carefully. ignore the timing, the words, everything, just give your full attention to each isolated note.
If you feel yourself wanting to switch to the next register take the note down a half step and make sure that is solid. go between the note you are comfortable with and the note you are not while trying to maintain the conditions (mouth, throat, chest etc) that make one of them comfortable.
I saw some rapid gains doing that but it eventually settled to a gain of maybe 1/2 a tone in 1 week of careful practice (ie, don't overdo it)

Preventing mumbling: I sometimes find closing my eyes, even only briefly, aids relaxation, improves projection and boosts confidence as a result (all a net gain in making words more audible). It's a helpful training fix but it's not something you want to become reliant on if you plan to perform (eye contact is important)
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CiX

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #45 on: July 10, 2012, 12:55:35 pm »
Ideally you want to try and develop all of your registers so that they overlap  and then blend seamlessly into eachother. find the effective edge of each register and slowly try to push it further without switching.
once there's an overlap of at least a few notes try to bring elements of both of them in at the same time, keep working at that until it's a seamless transition.

try to figure out why you jump to falsetto, when it comes to that particular part slow down and take it one note at a time. slowly and carefully. ignore the timing, the words, everything, just give your full attention to each isolated note.
If you feel yourself wanting to switch to the next register take the note down a half step and make sure that is solid. go between the note you are comfortable with and the note you are not while trying to maintain the conditions (mouth, throat, chest etc) that make one of them comfortable.
I saw some rapid gains doing that but it eventually settled to a gain of maybe 1/2 a tone in 1 week of careful practice (ie, don't overdo it)

Preventing mumbling: I sometimes find closing my eyes, even only briefly, aids relaxation, improves projection and boosts confidence as a result (all a net gain in making words more audible). It's a helpful training fix but it's not something you want to become reliant on if you plan to perform (eye contact is important)

Strangely enough that strikes a chord. Not looking to be a brilliant singer but would be nice to be confident enough to sing along to some tracks with other people present without sounding like a neutered cat or maybe even enough confidence to do some u tube stuff.

I will try your suggestions tonight.. Try find my vocal range and pop back if i have any other questions if thats ok.

Thanks

Offline sanied

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #46 on: September 07, 2012, 12:17:00 pm »
i fall to pieces when im asked to sing, dunno what it is, stage fright, anxiety, even practicing in the house if i know the wife is about i just strumm along and hmm the melody to myself.

Tho is i am out for a night and theres kareoke on its hard to get me off the stage  ::), must be the beer i guess ;)

Does anyone else have/had this issue and any tips on how to deal with it?

Offline Tourniquet

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #47 on: September 08, 2012, 09:52:53 pm »
Record yourself playing and singing (audio and video if you can). Just pressing record exposes you to similar pressure to live performance, the recording allows you to assess how other people hear you (can be strange if you're not used to the sound of your own voice) and gives you a recording others can listen to and offer pointers.

really is worth doing.

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kentl

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #48 on: November 13, 2012, 08:24:26 am »
I've never understtod why this question is not the first one pepole do when teaching someone
How do you "make the notes"
With guitar, piano, Vioan,etc all of which I can play some what you press something or what not and it makes the note I want 100%
I open my mouth and try to sing, its sometimes a C, E or what ever, playing scales on a guitar or piano along with it dont mater, I never hit the ones I want.
 My voice dont sound good, but I cant even get close to the right notes so not much point in improing anythign else till I can hit notes I want right?>


I know "pratice" but thats it I dont know how, I mean play scales yes, but I cant "lower pitch" owhen I need to, when I try to it ogten gose the wrong way not to metion I play a C and my vocals are doing an F#

been doing this for a while and not much luck I just dont know how to lower raise pitch at comand really, in terms of singing.

Offline Dan Graves

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Re: Singing 101
« Reply #49 on: November 13, 2012, 09:32:29 am »
I have a suggestion for those struggling with playing and singing; try Johnny Cash's cover of 'Hurt', playing just the acoustic guitar part and singing along with that.
Doesn't have to be in the original key, you can capo up if you can't sing as low as Cash.
A former customer of mine had this problem and after he learned this particular song, he felt a bit more confident about being able to learn how to properly sing and play at the same time.
The beauty lies in that it's a fairly simple but powerfull song, it works in a lot of keys, and if you manage to do it, you'll feel a bit more accomplished, and more self-confidence is always a plus.

 

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