Author Topic: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.  (Read 69933 times)

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Online DarrellW

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #225 on: June 11, 2018, 07:10:56 pm »
Once you can play a few songs from the stage you’re on then you should be able to start on the next stage learning new chords, 60 changes isn’t a hard and fast rule and you shouldn’t let it hold you back - of course try to achieve it but when you feel the need to go forward do so!
You could always record yourself and post your recording for constructive critique (it will always be constructive here!) and then you will have an unbiased opinion of how things are going!
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Offline tobyjenner

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #226 on: June 11, 2018, 07:54:05 pm »
Rake

Benchmark for first few stages is actually 40, which is stated in the lesson notes somewhere but for some reason most folk miss it and are always chasing 60. So if your chords are clean and you've managed TLB, move on. Work on the other Stage 1 songs while learning the Stage 2 tech stuff ie new chords.

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Offline Sc0rn3d

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #227 on: June 12, 2018, 05:14:41 am »
It might be because it's listed under the practice schedule for stage 2 but I get what you are saying. I think I moved on once I hit 40, just to come back and try again later in the lessons and be able to hit 60 thanks to practicing the other ones. I'm with the others(although not as experienced), it's probably best not to get too hung up on the exact number. Practicing the songs has been a huge help in my one minute changes.

https://www.justinguitar.com/guitar-lessons/stage-2-practice-schedule-bc-129


Offline rakelbara

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #228 on: June 15, 2018, 09:29:33 pm »
Well I just did a test and I don't have a problem with 60 changes pr. minute WITHOUT strumming, but as soon as I add strumming the A and D chords, it slows me down because I am focusing too much on not hitting all the strings.  The E chord is not a problem since I can just strum all the strings there.
Any tips on how I can get the strumming on A and D down?

Offline Rob7

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What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #229 on: July 12, 2018, 02:15:16 pm »
At what point do people move onto the next stage? I know for stage 1 Justin says to get at least 40 changes a minute for the one minute changes and to be able to play one or two of the songs even if you have to start and stop a little bit.

I'm wondering more with regards to the tempo of the songs. For example, Hound Dog is supposed to be played at 175bpm (according to the internet) but that seems really fast for a stage 1 guitarist.

So, at what point did people decide to move on from a song? Did you work to a percentage of the tempo e.g. 70% and keep revisiting it over time alongside newer stuff until you could play it at the correct tempo? If so at what stage did you stop doing that and were able to play at the full tempos?

Also, should you be able to play it without the metronome before moving on?

Offline DavidP

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #230 on: July 12, 2018, 02:52:00 pm »
Rob, my 2cs worth ...

At what point do people move onto the next stage? I know for stage 1 Justin says to get at least 40 changes a minute for the one minute changes and to be able to play one or two of the songs even if you have to start and stop a little bit.

I think you can make your decision to move to stage 2 based on your One-Minute-Changes and Strum-Pick-Strum exercises.  Once you reach 40 on OMC and are generally clean and comfortable on SPS then I'd say move on.

Many folk continue to work on songs using A D E as they start learning Am Dm Em.  I think that is fine.

Less fine is starting and stopping ... a widely accepted principle is that whatever you do in practise is what you will get down.  So best is to practice being smooth, without hesitating, however, slow the tempo to allow that is.  As you get it down then increase tempo and brain is better able to make this happen, since it is "just" speeding up what you can do. 

That is assuming the hesitation is caused by not being able to change fast enough rather than being uncertain of what chord comes next.  If that is the case then I'd suggest writing the progression down to aid in learning it and committing it to memory.

At what point do people move onto the next stage? I know for stage 1 Justin says to get at least 40 changes a minute for the one minute changes and to be able to play one or two of the songs even if you have to start and stop a little bit.

I'm wondering more with regards to the tempo of the songs. For example, Hound Dog is supposed to be played at 175bpm (according to the internet) but that seems really fast for a stage 1 guitarist.

So, at what point did people decide to move on from a song? Did you work to a percentage of the tempo e.g. 70% and keep revisiting it over time alongside newer stuff until you could play it at the correct tempo? If so at what stage did you stop doing that and were able to play at the full tempos?

Don't worry about the original tempo as a beginner.  Being able to play it smoothly on time far more important.  Over time you will speed up.  And you'll find, even playing a song much slower than the original, will still sound good if you are playing steadily, without hesitation.  Listen to how good songs sound when Justin walks through the chord progression playing just 4 simple down-strums really slowly.

Also, should you be able to play it without the metronome before moving on?

No, I think in the early stages stay with the metronome.  I did lots of work with the metronome and probably stopped practising my strumming patterns with the metronome too soon.  Now when I record I either use a metronome/drum and try to be solid or play and sing together and wait for feedback as to how my tempo is drifting faster/slower and my rhythm is steady.

Offline stitch101

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #231 on: July 12, 2018, 04:40:16 pm »
Rob you're over thinking tnings. Your guitar journey has just started and as you
move through the beginner course you will improve.
If you can play Hound Dog even at a low bpm your doing great. If you can do the one
minute changes with few mistakes at 40 changes a minute you're doing great.
Move to stage 2 and if you have time keep doing stage 1 practice routine.
The more/different things you do the better you'll get. And have fun, music is the best
gift you can give yourself.
 




Offline Rob7

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #232 on: July 13, 2018, 12:34:23 pm »
Rob, my 2cs worth ...

I think you can make your decision to move to stage 2 based on your One-Minute-Changes and Strum-Pick-Strum exercises.  Once you reach 40 on OMC and are generally clean and comfortable on SPS then I'd say move on.

Many folk continue to work on songs using A D E as they start learning Am Dm Em.  I think that is fine.

Less fine is starting and stopping ... a widely accepted principle is that whatever you do in practise is what you will get down.  So best is to practice being smooth, without hesitating, however, slow the tempo to allow that is.  As you get it down then increase tempo and brain is better able to make this happen, since it is "just" speeding up what you can do. 

That is assuming the hesitation is caused by not being able to change fast enough rather than being uncertain of what chord comes next.  If that is the case then I'd suggest writing the progression down to aid in learning it and committing it to memory.

Don't worry about the original tempo as a beginner.  Being able to play it smoothly on time far more important.  Over time you will speed up.  And you'll find, even playing a song much slower than the original, will still sound good if you are playing steadily, without hesitation.  Listen to how good songs sound when Justin walks through the chord progression playing just 4 simple down-strums really slowly.

No, I think in the early stages stay with the metronome.  I did lots of work with the metronome and probably stopped practising my strumming patterns with the metronome too soon.  Now when I record I either use a metronome/drum and try to be solid or play and sing together and wait for feedback as to how my tempo is drifting faster/slower and my rhythm is steady.

Thanks for the advise David. I'm not actually finding that I'm stopping and starting which is good, I was more just pointing out that I have read what Justin has said about moving on as I know it annoys some people that some people don't read that stuff first before asking a question as what Justin has already said might answer their question.

I can manage 40+ changes fine. I feel like I'm fine with the strum pick strum exercises however, I have noticed when I play a chord and compare to Justin playing it in either a video or the ear training tracks that they don't sound the same but I suspect this is due to the action on my guitar being high and so hopefully when I get a setup done this will solve that issue.

I'll try not to worry too much about the tempo for now and keep at it with the metronome.

Offline Rob7

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #233 on: July 13, 2018, 12:37:47 pm »
Rob you're over thinking tnings. Your guitar journey has just started and as you
move through the beginner course you will improve.
If you can play Hound Dog even at a low bpm your doing great. If you can do the one
minute changes with few mistakes at 40 changes a minute you're doing great.
Move to stage 2 and if you have time keep doing stage 1 practice routine.
The more/different things you do the better you'll get. And have fun, music is the best
gift you can give yourself.

 Hi Stitch. I'm not actually learning hound dog at the moment, I was just using that as an example because it has a high tempo. I'm currently learning Three Little Birds which I find I'm getting alright at. Once I've got a setup done on my guitar I might record myself playing either with the metronome or along with the backing track on the app for some constructive criticism and depending on that I may move on then and start stage two while learning feelin alright.

Thanks for the advise.

Offline tony6767

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #234 on: September 17, 2018, 11:02:41 am »
After months of practise would'nt you get a lesson and see if you are where you think you are?

Offline hilts17

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Re: What to learn next? Should I move to the next stage? etc etc.
« Reply #235 on: September 17, 2018, 11:49:35 am »
After months of practise would'nt you get a lesson and see if you are where you think you are?

A lesson from who? Surely not Justin who is far too busy.

At the end of each stage in the course there is a section called Stage # Practice Schedule. At the bottom it tells you what you should be able to do before moving to the next stage. If you can honestly say you can do the suggested things listed, you are where you should be.
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