Author Topic: BC-131 • The G Chord  (Read 76450 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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BC-131 • The G Chord
« on: July 02, 2009, 10:21:12 am »
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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2009, 07:03:10 am »
@ licksnkicks

nothing wrong with it at all

it is a perfect lead in to playing the G chord with the 3rd fret of the b string held down too (with the 3rd finger) - used in hundreds of songs

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2009, 11:27:41 am »
@ licksnkicks

nothing wrong with it at all

it is a perfect lead in to playing the G chord with the 3rd fret of the b string held down too (with the 3rd finger) - used in hundreds of songs

Yep - like Hallelujah & Good Riddance that are in the songs list.

I play it both ways, but for songs with quick chord changes (particularly G to C or vice versa) I prefer the pinky method as it allows you to get your index finger down much faster.

Also as a beginner your pinky generally doesn't get much of a workout and playing G with the pinky is a good way of hardening it up for later on.

So it really doesn't matter but were I you licksnkicks I'd still try playing it with the ring finger to try and improve strength and flexibility as you can't avoid using it for some things as you go along.

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pcgjr47

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2009, 05:10:59 pm »
I often see Justin playing the G with his pinky on the high E, middle on the A, and ring playing low E.... I figure he does that for a reason can someone explain the advantages to me playing it that way if there are any? 

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2009, 08:02:58 pm »
It makes for faster changes in some instances eg G to C (a fairly common change) - whilst I play G both ways mostly I prefer to use the pinky method - I do a similar thing with the E chord as having you index finger free helps with changes to E shaped barre chords

Another advantage is that some songs use a G that uses 4 finger and incorporates the D note on the B string eg Good Riddance, Hallelujah to name a couple and having your pinky used to going to that position on the G note on the E string is a real help - same, same Em7.

Finally - the other advantage I see for beginners is that as you rarely use your pinky for other stuff it gives you an opportunity to toughen it up as you are definitely going to need it down the track a bit.

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2012, 06:42:26 am »
practice what you can't do - so practice the 'small' G chord

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2012, 05:18:48 pm »
I practiced the G chord and I am quite comfortable with it now. But one thing I noticed that when I press the A string by my 2nd finger's fingertip, it touches a bit to the D string. So I have to press it by a little lower part of my finger(or I might say softer part of the finger), then it doesn't touch at all. It feels fine, but gives me the feeling of breaking some rules ;) Is that okay..? Or is there a way to get the finger tip pressed without letting it touch the D string..?

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2012, 11:08:23 pm »
Well the first and most important rule is make it sound good.  You don't want to mute the D string, it sounds like the adjutment you made was slight.  So I think you are fine.

The only other way I know to try to 'miss' the D strimg would be to arch your second finger a bit more so it is leaving the fret board at a steeper angle.

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Offline Oddo

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2012, 09:40:07 am »
I tried playing the G chord and I feel that i can press harder with my third finger if it is in a straight position rather than being bent as Justin suggested.Is it ok or should I try to play the chord just as he did?

Offline Diamond Dave

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2012, 01:46:12 am »
You don't need to press hard...only hard enough to make the note ring clearly. You'd be surprised how little pressure that takes. You don't need to press the string all the way down to the fretboard either.
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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2012, 11:08:58 pm »
Hallo everybody,

I am ready for the stage 4. I can do changes, play a lot of songs and everything what I´m suppose to can do in this stage 3. But I realize a really weird thing about fingering my G chord and sometimes its pretty uncomfortable and my third finger do it automatically :-O See the photo bellow, please. I think its better than long explaining. :-)

Should I do something with that? Practice G chord again a still think of it, while Im playing? Or just dont take care about it?

 

Offline misterg

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2012, 11:23:02 pm »
...Should I do something with that? Practice G chord again a still think of it, while Im playing? Or just dont take care about it?

I wouldn't worry about it too much.

If you move your thumb more to the middle of the neck, you should be able to curl your fingers more which will reduce the chance of your 2nd finger muting the A string and make life easier for your 3rd finger, but no big deal IMHO.

Andy

Offline Dr Winterbourne

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2012, 05:36:46 am »
I agree with the advice regarding lowering your thumb.

I had a private lesson with Justin a few years ago, after I had been playing about 9 months, and he noticed that I did the same thing. He said it would slow down my ability to change, once I wanted to play more quickly, as the extra time needed to unlock the finger would eventually become an issue.

I concentrated for a few weeks specifically on NOT doing this, and it largely went away, although the tendency sometimes rears its head when I am playing scales. Be aware of it, practice not doing it.

It really can be a problem when I want to play scales very quickly, for example the first position major scale when I get to the 7th note my ring finger sometimes locks this way.

Start fighting the tendency, I would say, as it can stay with you and infect other parts of your playing. 
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Offline mouser9169

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2014, 11:33:52 am »
At the risk of necro'ing this thread, I've got this question about this lesson and how he teaches it (so this seems the best thread to post it in).

One of Justin's main goals is to get beginners able to change chords easily so they can start playing songs. That's a goal I'm totally down with. Songs are fun and fun keeps you motivated and going when you're starting out.

You can see it clearly in the way he teaches the fingering for the A chord: fingers 3, 1, 2 top string to bottom rather than the 'obvious' 1, 2, 3 ( the 'ideal' for changes would be 1, 3, 2 but that's just ridiculously hard to finger).

Why not apply the same logic to the G chord? If you play it with fingers 2, 3, and 4 in the same positions you would play with fingers 1, 2, and 3 you accomplish 2 things:

1) Your 2nd and 3rd fingers are in the same relative position they are in the C and D chords, making those very common changes much easier. You just pick up those two fingers and move them as a unit: over one fret for the C chord and drop your index finger down, or all the way across the fretboard for the D chord, and also drop your index finger down. In both cases though, you can move those two fingers together.

2) You start using your pinky, which is one of the weakest fingers for beginners, while still using your ring finger. It also makes the chord less of a reach for beginners just starting to limber up their hands.

Developing the 'stretch' between your ring and pinky is at least as important as developing the stretch between your ring and middle (IMHO). In 'standard' position playing, the middle and ring fingers stay on their frets with the index and pinky stretching out as needed.

He mentions this fingering _very_ briefly in the G chord variations lesson, but in the context of muting the A string, saying "It sounds better that way, so why use the third finger at all?", but it sounds exactly the same as the 'normal' way of playing the G chord he taught in the first lesson so long as you've got your fingers placed correctly. By that logic, why play a 'normal' G chord at all?
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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2014, 12:15:27 pm »
Some good points. 

One reason for the 2 1 3 fingering (low to high strings) would be to support the "four finger" G chord.  With the third finger playing the D note on the B string and the pinky playing the G on the high E sting.

3 pinky
3 third
0
0
2 first
3 second

Which with a slight mod gives you the open G5 power chord.

3 pinky
3 third
0
0
x
3 second

So many G grips so little time. 

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Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2014, 04:20:59 pm »
Quote
2) You start using your pinky, which is one of the weakest fingers for beginners, while still using your ring finger. It also makes the chord less of a reach for beginners just starting to limber up their hands.

I agree with you here but because your pinky is the weakest and least coordinated finger I can see a lot of
beginners getting frustrated and quitting. Also the pinky is the shortest so playing the G chord with 2 3 4
could be more of a stretch.

As shadow points out about the 4 finger G and the 4 finger G is used a lot in Rock and pop ie G D Cadd9
is very common in Rock. I see a lot of country guitarist play play the G chord with the 234 fingering
because C F G and G C D are very common chord progressions in country music.

Offline pt3r

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2014, 09:14:11 am »
Is it ok to use the Folk G shape (which Justin only describes in stage 8 ) when practicing the one minute C-G changes or do you recommend to persevere and stick to the shape described in BC-131? I stumbled across this shape through reading up on the Brown eyed girl thread.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2014, 08:38:38 pm by pt3r »
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Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2014, 04:26:30 pm »
Watch the video starting at 3:40 and listen to what Justin say about all the other ways of playing the
G chord. You'll find you answer there.

Offline SiegeFrog

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2014, 04:29:07 pm »
Is it ok to use the Folk G shape (which Justin only describes in stage 8) when practicing the one minute C-G changes or do you recommend to persevere and stick to the shape described in BC-131? I stumbled across this shape through reading up on the Brown eyed girl thread.

In the BC-131 video, Justin mentions that he teaches the G major chord with the 123 fingering first because it works the stretch between the 2nd and 3rd fingers. In stage 8, he does teach some variations including the Folk G shape which does make changes between G and C much easier. I've encountered teachers who teach the Folk G with fingers 234 (same dots as Justin's G, just different fingers) as their main G major grip. In the end, you're probably going to want to master all the G major grips you can. I say trust Justin. Practice the 123 fingering and try to get the G-C change as solid as possible. It's a really common change (just about any song in the key of C or G has that change), so you need to get it down. Brown Eyed Girl is a great Stage 3 song to practice it with. Just start slowly.
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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2014, 04:38:20 pm »
Is it ok to use the Folk G shape (which Justin only describes in stage 8) when practicing the one minute C-G changes or do you recommend to persevere and stick to the shape described in BC-131? I stumbled across this shape through reading up on the Brown eyed girl thread.

Instead of, NO. 

Also, YES.

I assume the question was asked because the folk style is easier.  You need to be able to change to and from both.  And in doubt practice the one that is more difficult rather than less - assuming your goal is to become more proficient.

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2014, 06:39:47 pm »
Pt3r

Stick with the standard 123 BC131 fingering for now and stick with the BC program. You'll encounter the Rock G along the way and get the different fingering tuition in BC8. It may be a bit of a stretch for now but that's a good thing. I've said this in quite a few threads but you need that good solid foundation, especially on the standard open chord fingerings.
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Offline Borodog

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #21 on: October 08, 2014, 06:42:39 pm »
The 2 finger G is also very useful, pinky on 3rd fret 1st string, ring on 3rd fret 6th string while also muting the 5th string. Takes the low B  which can be "muddy", out of the bass, and leave 2 fingers free to hammer on notes.
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Offline pt3r

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2014, 08:34:34 pm »
Thanks for the answers I got confused with the need of the 3 finger G chord vs the 2 finger Folk G since, as Justin points out, they sound the same to my ears, and the folk G chord is indeed much easier to switch to a G. To switch from a C to the 3 finger G chord, on the other hand, does not feel much more complicated than switching to the 2 finger folk G.

I understand that justin recommends this shape to do the stretch between the third and the second finger but i actually play the folk G in the same way as the 3 finger G except I don't use the index finger. So the stretch between my second and third finger is the same as when I play it in 3 finger G or the folk G
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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2014, 10:54:47 pm »
At the end of the day just take things real slow, especially if you're having problems with this or any other new chords. Follow Justin's lesson, explore the fingering and take time to learn to stretch into a position where the chord rings cleanly. It does not matter if that's all you're focusing on right now. Just slowly stretch and adjust thumb elbow, everything until you think 'hey that sounded and felt good'. Then practice that position and only then start trying to apply it, in changes and songs. You will get there 8)
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Offline sanddancer

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Re: BC-131 • The G Chord
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2015, 10:38:15 am »
Hi Guy's
Just started the G chord & was wondering if it ok to play the chord with the edge of my palm touching the neck of the guitar.
As I'm playing the E string with my 3rd finger on the 3rd fret anyway it doesn't matter if my palm is touching the string as the note plays with no problem. If I try to keep a gap between my palm & the neck I really struggle to keep my fingers curled & end up muting some of the strings.
I'm hoping that over time the gap between my palm & the neck will open up as my fingers develop.
This is the only chord so far that I have had a problem with regarding the gap, & being a newbie was thinking that this would be ok & will develop over time & practice, but was worried that I might end up developing a bad habit
Any opinions please

 

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