Author Topic: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes  (Read 186900 times)

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AndrewBW

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #45 on: March 03, 2012, 03:21:01 am »
Hi all-I'm having some hand cramps when I move from A to E.  When I go to move my second finger up, the other fingers start to cramp up and as a result this is my slowest scoring 1 minute chord change.

Are you by any chance trying to play Justin's D7 form on the A chord? I tried playing that for a while but had to stop because it made my hand cramp up horribly. At first I found it was actually easier to finger than the regular A because it spread my fingers out more. But ultimately doing the regular fingering (4 on B, 3 on G, 2 on D) easier on my hand. That said, I think lots of people find A the hardest chord to finger, and if you've only been playing for a week then I think you've probably got a ways to go.

Offline Smilemaker

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #46 on: March 05, 2012, 11:57:32 pm »
I started playing about 6 weeks ago and I am in the middle of stage 3. I'm just curious to know from people who have completed the beginner's course: how long did it take to complete the entire beginner's course. I practice about 30 - 45 min per day and I think I am going along at a fair pace. I am trying to set a challenging, but doable goal for myself and I would like to get some ideas as to how to set it. Thanks!

Offline Dr Winterbourne

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #47 on: March 06, 2012, 12:04:40 am »
I practiced about the same omount as you, and it took me about 6 months, I think.

But judge it by the criteria of the lessons, not by time.
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Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #48 on: March 06, 2012, 02:19:20 am »
I'm a tad confused about 1 minute changes' proficiency'. I count each single chord strummed as 1, so C1, G2, C3... etc. In the vids, Justin says target 60 - even really thumping along on my easy (finger anchor) chords I'm only getting into the 50s. For most chords up to stage 3, I'd be in the 30s.

But I still stumble on a couple of the songs, which I saw is also acceptable.

So where are you deemed proficient enough to move on, and add stuff to your practice repertoire? I'm in no hurry, I want to learn the basics as well as I can without skipping, but getting into the 60s with all chords so far is going to take a looong time. I'm currently managing about a hour or more a day, but usually broken into 2 sessions.

Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #49 on: March 06, 2012, 07:13:19 am »
@Drubbing: generally speaking, if you feel you're ready to add something new to your practice routine, that's the right point. Just make sure that you have enough practice time to keep working on what you already learned. The more you learn, the more flexible your fingers become and the more control you gain, so what you learn tomorrow may help solve things you struggle with today.

Beyond that, I seem to remember Justin mentioning that 30c/s is a good threshold to move on to the next stage. Not quite sure about that, though.

AndrewBW

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #50 on: March 06, 2012, 08:29:19 pm »
I think that sometimes when you struggle with something it's just good to forget about it for a while and move on to something new, and go back to it later. It's good to struggle with things, but frustration can lead to boredom and resentfulness, and then you just need to let things settle into your head. Once it gets in there, the act of recalling it later is very helpful in learning.

I've been working on the beginner course off and on for about six months and am up to stage eight. I generally practice for about an hour a day. I've also been taking a break now and then to work on some other things, both from Justin (like some of his blues and folk lessons) and on my own. But as I'm nearing the end now I'm really trying to shore up the things in the beginner course that are still spotty, and get better at some of the songs. I'm hoping that in another month or two I'll finish stage nine and be ready to move on to the next level.

ComfyJammies

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #51 on: March 07, 2012, 03:38:07 am »
I started playing about 6 weeks ago and I am in the middle of stage 3. I'm just curious to know from people who have completed the beginner's course: how long did it take to complete the entire beginner's course. I practice about 30 - 45 min per day and I think I am going along at a fair pace. I am trying to set a challenging, but doable goal for myself and I would like to get some ideas as to how to set it. Thanks!
I'm just about to start stage 9 and I've been going about 6 months.   I wasn't starting from scratch though, so the first few stages went very quickly.  For me, stage 6 with the F chord was a big block for me though, so that one alone took 2 months and slowed me down, but I moved on and kept working on it through 7 and 8 and still do every day in my one-minute changes.  When you get to stage 6 and beyond, you are working on so many things, not just chord changes, but scales, fingerpicking, blues, harder strumming patterns, etc, so things do slow down. If the F chord is easier for you, you may get through quicker.   My current goal is to finish stage 9 by April (so about 7-8 months total).

You put your question in the 1-minute changes so I'll say those were the single biggest thing that improved my guitar playing.  Getting up over 50-60 for all of the changes really really helps.

Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #52 on: March 07, 2012, 04:22:06 am »

You put your question in the 1-minute changes so I'll say those were the single biggest thing that improved my guitar playing.  Getting up over 50-60 for all of the changes really really helps.


Agreed. Just strumming out chords would be mind numbing and progress wouldn't be great. Just trying to get really fast and being a little sloppy does the trick, and when you slow down the fingers catch up. Really helps with the muscle memory.


Offline BarbaraH

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #53 on: April 04, 2012, 07:38:44 pm »
Hi :)
Enjoying the 1min challenge - can't believe I still have skin on my fingers  :) I was wondering if you advise moving between three cords. I've been doing the A,D and E together today but wondered if it's better just to do two chords to secure technique. I found I was fine doing three but wasn't sure if you think this is a good idea
Thanks - really enjoying the hard copy of Beginner book and Beginner Song Book
Barbara ;D

Offline bradt

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #54 on: April 04, 2012, 08:19:26 pm »
Honestly, after one week of learning, you shouldn't even bother with measuring your speed.

Slow down. Then slow down some more. Practice the chord change very, very slowly and deliberately. Try to relax your hand. Watch how hard you press the strings down. In the beginning, most people press too hard, which can lead to weird reactions in the hand.

Aren't you are supposed to go fast on the 1 minute changes? I though that's the whole point of them. The idea isn't to be a speed demon, but to be able to improve speed and write it down in your practice journal so you can measure improvement over time.



I think the cramps are normal. I got them too; still do if I practice tight chords for too long (A,D,etc). These are positions your hands are not used to going into. If you start cramping, practice something else for a while. It stops doing it eventually, so don't try to force it.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 08:48:26 pm by bradt »

Offline bradt

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #55 on: April 04, 2012, 08:31:21 pm »
I'm a tad confused about 1 minute changes' proficiency'. I count each single chord strummed as 1, so C1, G2, C3... etc. In the vids, Justin says target 60 - even really thumping along on my easy (finger anchor) chords I'm only getting into the 50s. For most chords up to stage 3, I'd be in the 30s.

It's pretty boring, but I like to pop out a metronome and set it to just higher than my changes have been and play along for a few minutes. I found that the rhythm has helped me play cleaner by avoiding the mad dash of finger confusion in between each change. I keep doing the 1 minute changes too, but adjust my metronome as the count improves.

Offline misterg

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #56 on: April 04, 2012, 11:17:32 pm »
Aren't you are supposed to go fast on the 1 minute changes? I though that's the whole point of them.

Yes.

The one minute changes aren't about rhythm or accuracy particularly - it's a competitive training exercise that has been proven to help people get up to speed with chord changes.

Accuracy comes from the 'Strum Pick Strum' exercise which should go side by side with the 'One Minute Changes' exercise. Rhythm is introduced later in the Beginner's Course.

@Jack - it does start very early in the course. Justin teaches the chords & gets people changing between them as quickly as possible (not to any rhythm) before moving on to teaching rhythm & strumming. It's very clever, because it's a way of getting this out of the way so that slow chord changes don't hinder people when they move on to strumming and songs.

@Drubbing - keep at it, and speed will come. FWIW I stopped doing changes once I consistently got >50 on that pair of chords and thought that was OK.

@Barbara - Hi :)  I wouldn't worry about doing 3 chords. It's not something you will be doing when you play songs. If you get the pairs of chords up to speed, the rest will take care of itself - move on.

Andy

amolpatily2010

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #57 on: May 29, 2012, 07:55:11 am »
I am doing 30 or so changes. But, as I try to increase the speed, I realised that when I am changing the chords I have to look at both of my hands- left hand to get the chords right and right hand to see from where I am starting the strum (6th, 5th or 4th for E,A,D respectively)- So, this is kinda acting as a hindrance to get the chords faster. Atleast If I were to constantly able to look at only one hand, then maybe it would increase my speed significantly. But, If I try avoiding the left hand, then I get the chords but not consistently right and similarly not looking at the right hand makes me strum more or less strings.
Any suggestions or opinions will be helpful.
 

Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #58 on: May 29, 2012, 08:06:14 am »
When you're doing one minute changes and you're gunning for speed, forget your right hand (strumming hand) for the moment. If you hit the A string on a D chord it's not the end of the world. This exercise is more about the fretting hand and (and this one's for you ;)) about getting you to not think that much about it and just do it.

In time you should try to not look at your hands at all (like Justin always says: from stage there are much more interesting things to look at). When your in the rhythm and doing the changes, just look up for a moment. Get used to the idea of letting your hands do their job on their own.

amolpatily2010

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #59 on: May 29, 2012, 08:27:59 am »
Okay.. I get the point. So now after getting the strumming hand out of the question And yes I was trying to make the chords without looking at the hands and in the process I get first few changes right, then again would press a wrong string or so and gradually & unknowingly (that would be obvious because i am not looking at the hands) i would move my fingers away from the frets.
Or simply put as, now as I am concentrating on the speed,
should I not all worry about getting nice chords
 ( in this case it will be done by looking at the frettting hand)?
OR
 I refrain from looking at the hand..get a few good changes, then if I accidentally moved on a wrong string, have a quick glance get it right & continue without looking at the hand. Of course, it will reduce my speed but still seems as a better option in the longer run and this increases my dilemma now..
what should I do?

 

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