Author Topic: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes  (Read 192488 times)

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Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #60 on: May 29, 2012, 08:41:04 am »
It's primarily a speed exercise, so you'd make it far more difficult not watching you fretting hand. Forming chords without looking comes with practice and repetition - not very helpful when simply learning them.

Focus on your fretting hand and just strum, it doesn't matter if you strum a string or two too many. Strumming chords is going to be easier to learn than fretting them, so focussing on fretting.

Eveyone will hear it if you get a chord fretted wrong, few will if you get it right but strum and extra string.

The idea is to build speed first, accuracy comes from getting your fingers into position faster, and it does work.

amolpatily2010

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #61 on: May 29, 2012, 08:56:32 am »
hey mate thanks for dat & I got that point.. I was facing another problem now whether to try unperfect chords with lesser speed by not looking at the fretting hand.. OR get good chords with better speed by looking at the fretting hand..
I know with time I have to get it without looking at the hand but what should do now in 1 min changes..?

Offline Chantal

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #62 on: May 29, 2012, 09:18:27 am »
Okay.. I get the point. So now after getting the strumming hand out of the question And yes I was trying to make the chords without looking at the hands and in the process I get first few changes right, then again would press a wrong string or so and gradually & unknowingly (that would be obvious because i am not looking at the hands) i would move my fingers away from the frets.


I have had this problem too. And then one day I noticed I was playing a song without looking at either hand, but just reading the chords in the song book.

I don't know when I stopped looking at my hands for those chords, it must have been something that happened gradually. I do know I intentionally practiced taking my hand off the guitar neck, relaxing my fingers and then grabbing a specific chord without looking at the guitar first. I did that in my chord practice and maybe it helped me in getting the feel for the chord changes too.

But anyway, you will notice one day that you're playing your chords (or at least these ones) without looking at the strings and still getting them right. And it may happen sooner than you think 'cause I haven't been playing very long either!
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Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #63 on: May 29, 2012, 09:19:32 am »
I'd say start with looking away for a short moment from time to time. Try to get the idea out of your head that you need your eyes to form a chord. You can also sit down and try to find a chord without looking at your hand, just to get the feel for it. Doing that can greatly improve your accuracy, too. Feel the strings, the frets, the positions.

This isn't something overwhelmingly important in the beginning, but I think it's a good idea to get it into your practice routine in some form or other. Otherwise it'll be very difficult to "unlearn" that habit later on.

And once you can play without looking (at least most of the time - not talking about a 10 fret slide here), it makes you a much more relaxed player. It also enables you to sing while you play, which is very difficult of your neck is "craned" over the guitar. You can read chord sheets, tabs, or sheet music while you play, and consequently you can just play something from a piece of paper without having to memorize everything first. Also, let's face it: it doesn't look cool when a guitarist is bending over his guitar and constantly nodding his head between neck and body ;) In the beginning many people find that necessary, but at some point you should get rid of that habit.

Offline dalepres

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #64 on: May 31, 2012, 12:41:06 am »
The one minute changes are a great exercise.  I think they work particularly well because you set the one minute time.  It keeps us going long enough to get benefit - though I have to admit that with the three fingered A to D to E changes, I can't do a whole minute before hand cramps stop me.  But I'm getting closer than the 10 or 15 seconds I started at.

But the amazing thing about this exercise that made me want to post here is that it has really helped.  I am one of those guys with the short fat fingers of a man who has worked with tools his whole life.  Though short, my hands are broad enough that even strangers have commented on them.  I was certain that I would never get the three-fingered A on my 1 3/4 inch neck.  My fingers are too short for a 2 inch classical neck and too fat for the narrow neck.

But enough excuse making and whining.  As helpless as it seemed, I stuck with the one-minute exercise and now I can do the change from A to D or A to E at a full cycle every 2 seconds.  I can only do it for about 30 to 40 seconds before my hands give out but that will come, too.  With all that working with my hands, including years of gripping exercises at the gym, I guess none of it exercised my hand muscles in the same way that squeezing the guitar neck between my fingers and thumb does.

Thanks, Jusin and company, for a great site and for lessons that actually work.

Offline Blue Merseysider.

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #65 on: June 01, 2012, 01:44:03 pm »
This 1 minute exercise thingymubob, the way we're told to hold the 'A' chord (basically with the fingers crossed as if it's a 'D7' chord) I'm struggling with (it's as if my fingers are too big).

I noticed in the songs later on in the book that in the chord diagram's we're being told to hold the 'A' in the more traditional (I believe) '1,2,3' across the fret pose.

Isn't this a bit confusing?  IE - Learn/Practice with one chord shape, only to use a different one later on?  Or doesn't this matter?

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Offline Chantal

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #66 on: June 01, 2012, 02:16:06 pm »
*dashes to find song book*

Looks like the only instances where other finger placements are shown, is where different chords are involved, such as A7sus4, where it's easier to change to Cadd9 and G if you use the more traditional fingerplacement. Or the instance where traditional fingering makes playing an Asus4 a piece of cake. And then there's the Am7/G chord which has a 123 fingering, but that's because it's basically a C chord but with the 5th and 6th strings swapped.

Justin explains when he shows A chord for the first time that other ways of fingering the chord are possible and that sometimes, they are recommended when used with other chords. But most of the time, 213 is the way to go because it allows you to play closer to the fret.
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Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #67 on: June 01, 2012, 09:11:36 pm »
The so-called "more traditional" finger placement (all in a row) is actually a lot harder in the long run, especially with bigger fingers. The index finger on the D string can get pretty far away from the fret, which means you need lots of strength and it's difficult to keep the string from buzzing. The 213 fingering also makes it much easier to change to other chords, especially "usual suspects" like D or Em. My advice is to stick with it, it's worth the effort.

This is one of the things I wished someone had told me back then. I wasted a lot of time trying to make sense of the "123" A chord, before I learned the other fingering and a couple of days later the problem was solved for good.

@Chantal: the mini-barre A is a possibility, but usually not a very good one. Almost everybody mutes the high E string with that fingering, and that'll be sorely missed if you're in a chord progression with other chords containing the high E string, not to mention that it severely limits your options for arpeggiating etc. Imho that's one of those "extra clever" tricks that can cost a lot of time in the end. And let's face it, the A chord is not exactly a hard one, even for the beginner's course (try a B7 for flavour).

Offline Diamond Dave

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #68 on: June 03, 2012, 01:35:18 am »
especially "usual suspects" like D or Em.

Only if you play Em with 1 and 2 and not 2 and 3.  :)

Justin uses both and is pretty ambivalent it seems in the lessons about which you use.

Jacksroadhouse has more experience than me, but I'd say which not learn all three--1-2-3, 2-1-3, and the mini-barre? You're going to learn a boat load of chords in the beginner's course anyway; two variations won't really add to your load that much.

And eventually, your chord changes will get so fast (give yourself a few months) that it really won't matter. You'll be zipping all over the fretboard.  :)
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Offline jacksroadhouse

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #69 on: June 03, 2012, 07:58:12 am »
Sorry, Dave, but imho for a beginner it doesn't make much sense to learn (and more importantly to practice) three different fingerings for one chord. There's so much to learn people really shouldn't waste time on details like that (we're talking stage 1 here). For now I'd pick one fingering that's versatile enough to do everything you want to do, and stick with it.

Once you got past a certain point in learning guitar, things like that won't matter that much anyway. You'll just use the fingering that suits the situation, there's usually no real "learning" involved anymore. E.g. I use 4 different fingerings fpr the open Em, depending on what I did before and what I'm going to do next. And believe it or not, the easiest and most versatile fingering is indeed 213.

I also just had a look at Justin's A chord lesson and Im having a hard time finding any ambiguity in terms of fingering in there. Let me quote:

"The one [fingering] that I think is the best now..."
"The one that I'm gonna show you works really, really, really good for..."
"I'm gonna show you my recommended way of playing an A chord",
"...if you really wanna do one of those other ones then do it, but I will hopefully give you enopugh good reasons to play the A chord with my suggested fingering"
"And this is the fingering for a A chord that I really recommend"
"I really, really recommend that you do these fingers..."

Later on he has a lesson on the "mini barre A", but I think that's more about introducing the idea of barres in preparation for big barre chords than anything else, which is the same reason why he teaches power chords very early on.

Offline Diamond Dave

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #70 on: June 03, 2012, 03:19:55 pm »
I had no problem learning three fingerings for A. It's not rocket science even at stage 1.

In other, later lessons, Justin says things like "whatever fingering for A you're using...Here I'm using (this fingering) because..."

Just a difference of opinion, jack. That's allowed.  ;)
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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #71 on: June 04, 2012, 08:02:40 am »
When I change chords I find it easier in most cases to put down my fingers one at a time (the one exception is E-AM where all my finders move together). Is this a bad practice?

Try as I might I am unable to move all three fingers  to corresponding strings simultaneously.

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Perfopt
putting fingers one at a time is not at all bad for anybody who is beginner!! but if you are thru with the chord than you should slowly go for changes ,like common changes are G,D,C or Am, D,G G,Emaj,D etc.. considering G,D,C first start by individually picking each chord and then slowly go after the changes.. always focus on the shapes of chords and accordingly change them. Many chords can just be changed by just adjusting 0ne or two fingers..like Emaj toEmin,Emaj to B7..etc.. not to panic and frustrate it takes time but you will eventually learn it.. :D

If at all tired and frustrated than watch  any of the justin's lesson and you will get back in rythm as the lessons are very motivating !! hope this info will help you... ;) :)

Offline DA_music

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #72 on: June 05, 2012, 07:20:58 am »
Just a quick question. How common is it to find yourself letting the chords ring out and then going "oh ****, I'm doing the 1-minute changes!"? I'm getting around 20 individual chords per minute and I think I could be on 30 if I wasn't allowing (not a conscious choice) them to ring out when I strum.
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Dynamite

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #73 on: June 05, 2012, 07:32:04 am »
Just a quick question. How common is it to find yourself letting the chords ring out and then going "oh ****, I'm doing the 1-minute changes!"? I'm getting around 20 individual chords per minute and I think I could be on 30 if I wasn't allowing (not a conscious choice) them to ring out when I strum.
you will soon cross 50 if you are not concentrating on ringing... focus on shapes and correctness of playing chords and not the numbers... coz if you are fingering the chord right than you yourself will enjoy the elegance of playing  it.... :D

Offline DA_music

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #74 on: June 05, 2012, 01:18:14 pm »
you will soon cross 50 if you are not concentrating on ringing... focus on shapes and correctness of playing chords and not the numbers... coz if you are fingering the chord right than you yourself will enjoy the elegance of playing  it.... :D

Thanks. So does the counting become a little secondary when you focus on the shapes even though the goal is to keep getting a higher amount?
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