Author Topic: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes  (Read 249957 times)

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Offline Setneck Tele USA

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #175 on: January 30, 2015, 05:09:12 pm »
That's why I'm not a fan of 1 minute changes.  Too many people get caught up in how many can you do.

But Justin doesn't recommend them in the manner some people take it.  They are only to be used once you can make chords perfectly.  You have to start slowly.  If that means you only do 5 chord changes in a minute then you only do 5 in a minute.  Justin constantly mentions going slowly at first on everything.
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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #176 on: January 30, 2015, 10:18:37 pm »
Watch the lesson.

Justin says they don't have to be perfect; but they can't be complete crap either.

I understand the usefulness of the tool and still use it when I am having trouble with a new chord grip(s) and transitions to and from it (them).

But I think people get WAY WAY WAY too worried about it as a stand alone thing to be conquered.  It ceases to be a tool and becomes a goal in and of itself.  It is a GREAT tool and a CRAPPY goal.

Shadow
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Offline m_c

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #177 on: February 04, 2015, 12:13:53 am »
One tip I think worth mentioning, is when I do 1 minute changes, is I always spend a few minutes either playing some songs I already know, or run through some chord sequences, just to get warmed up.

I'd still do the finger stretching, especially if you're struggling with the stretch for the chords, but I always found doing a few minutes of regular chord changes improved my minute changes.

Offline Tomen8r

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #178 on: February 19, 2015, 01:54:16 am »
I've been banging away for 6 weeks or so, with noticeable improvements. I set up a spreadsheet for the 1mm changes, tracking improvements. But I have issues..

My left hand is my catching hand for baseball/softball and hockey. All fingers have been broken 1 or more times. I have big hands/long fingers, but they are all pointing in the wrong direction!!!  And in different directions. My right hand, strumming hand, has perfectly straight fingers. Mangled fingers make it easy for some chords but difficult for others. The A chord, for example, is almost impossible. I"ve tried the beginner A chord on a folk and acoustic guitar (different necks) and it is a big struggle. And I've practiced that chord so much more than the others but I can't fit three bent fingers in that tiny space. I know there will be other ways to get the A chord. But I am thinking of starting over, left handed!  I've tried it a couple times, simply flipping guitar over (strings upside down) and I definitely have better control and chord strikes. But it is day 1 all over again left handed! 

Anyone else go through this? I will most likely stay the course playing right handed, keep plugging away. It's only been 6 weeks.  Who knows. Maybe I'll learn both ways. 2 guitars strung opposite each other. I am "amphibious" like that.  ;-)) 

Offline Accidia

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #179 on: February 20, 2015, 08:56:04 pm »
Hi, this is mi 1st post here.

I started just one month ago, 37 and never did anything related to music... and I'm about finishing (I think) 2nd stage of the begginers course and today I reached my first 60 changes (actually 64) on the 1 minute changes with the A-E chord change!!!!!  ;D ;D ;D ;D

On the other hand the changes with Dm that I'm doing (Dm-A and Dm-Am) I'm around 25 :(
Actually I'm struggling with the Dm chord also.

My question is: Justin tell us to practice what we cannot do... so yes, I have to practice Dm chord and changes Ok. But, do I have to practice the A-E changes? Or maybe is better I keep it practising them but focusing in the "quality" of the change?

BTW my other changes are around 40-50, so should I change to stage 3 or do I keep practising until improves my Dm?

Thanks!!!

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #180 on: February 20, 2015, 09:03:00 pm »
At this stage of your playing you keep practicing everything you can fit into the time you have to
practice.
So if you can practice all you've learnt so far with out running out of time then keep doing that.
If you are pressed for time practice the things you have the most trouble with first then the other
things in your remaining time.

Offline RaymondR

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #181 on: February 22, 2015, 05:20:55 am »
Hey guys, relatively new/beginner here. I'm not sure where exactly to post this question, but I've BC-154 the one minute changes for stage 5. My question is that Justin mentions that all my one minute changes at that point should be 60 (or rather 30) does that count for every possible combination of chord? or only the difficult ones like C - G and vice versa?

Edit: Should I be practicing every possible combination of chord? I know it sounds absurd but I'm sure that sooner or later you'll have to know all the changes or be comfortable with them.

Offline misterg

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #182 on: February 22, 2015, 08:52:33 pm »
Should I be practicing every possible combination of chord?

Hi, and welcome! :)

Short answer is no - do the combinations that Justin gives in the various lessons (they have been chosen for a reason). If there are any other combinations that crop up in songs that you play (or would like to play), which you find awkward, then you can put them in, too.

When you can get to 60 (or 30) reliably, then drop that combination and use the time to practice something else.


Offline m_c

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #183 on: February 22, 2015, 09:00:18 pm »
For stage 5, Justin doesn't specify any combinations, it's up to you to select 5 combinations to work on.

Personally, as I progressed through the stages, I didn't stop practising any combination until I managed 60 changes per minute. If there was a particular chord change from the previous stage I was still struggling with, I'd keep that on my list of 5 into the next stage practise, and then pick random combinations using the next stage chords to get my 5 combinations for practise. Once any change got up to 60 changes, I'd score it off and add a new combination.
Some combinations I picked because I was struggling with them in certain songs, others were just a random selection I hadn't already done.

Offline Lovenow

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #184 on: February 25, 2015, 11:08:08 pm »
I'm sure this gets asked often, and I did search but didn't find the answer. When Justin introduces the idea of 1m changes, he gives 2 ways of counting. He says he planned to count 1 cycle as one count, but that it's ok, in fact it's probably  better idea to make each chord count as one (each cycle count as two). BC115 about 4 minutes in.  He says the goal is 30 complete changes eventually (meaning 60 chords). No problem there. Now on BC129 'Should I Move On' he states you should have your one-minute changes down to 30 in a minute. So the question is, is that 30 complete changes, or 15 complete changes. It's not clear because he's introduced both ways and isn't specific at that point. I would think that 30 complete changes is pretty ambitious at this point, so I wonder if he means 30 chord changes, in other words 15 complete. I mean, I'm in beginner stage 2. The idea of being able to switch between Dm and A for 30 complete, seems like it would be easier to fly to the moon in my car. Thanks in advance.

Offline tobyjenner

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #185 on: February 25, 2015, 11:15:31 pm »
Lovenow

To keep it simple, one changes is for example A to D or A to E or D to E. Aim for 30 of theses at Stage 1.
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Offline Zapped

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #186 on: March 06, 2015, 12:40:50 pm »

BC115 about 4 minutes in.  He says the goal is 30 complete changes eventually (meaning 60 chords). No problem there. Now on BC129 'Should I Move On' he states you should have your one-minute changes down to 30 in a minute.
:
So the question is, is that 30 complete changes, or 15 complete changes.
:
I would think that 30 complete changes is pretty ambitious at this point, so I wonder if he means 30 chord changes, in other words 15 complete. I mean, I'm in beginner stage 2. The idea of being able to switch between Dm and A for 30 complete, seems like it would be easier to fly to the moon in my car.

As you said, at about 4 minutes into the BC115 video Justin is unambiguous. A "change" is two chords, so a goal of  "30 complete changes" in one minute is 60 chords total. If you instead find it easier to count each chord separately, that's fine, but to reach your goal in that case you count to 60. A recording of two people who are exactly meeting the goal would sound identical, even though one musician might say he meet his goal of 30 and the other say she met her goal of 60.

Playing the chords

    A  D  A  D  A  D  A  D

makes 4 complete changes, or 8 chord changes. Now if you really look at it you've only changed chords 7 times in that sequence, but most players return to the initial chord A to make the 8th chord change. I don't write a final A chord at the end because folks will just argue about whether that makes it 4-1/2 complete changes, and that's silly. When you're playing N complete changes per minute, and N is a large number, that final return to the first chord isn't worth talking about.

If you think 15 complete changes per minute is doable and 30 complete changes would be more difficult than driving to the moon in your car, as you put it, you need to set your metronome at a speed you're comfortable with and advance it just a little every day or so as you become comfortable with a new slightly faster tempo.

Now I personally think it's tough for a beginner to "lock on" to a slow metronome tempo. At some risk of making this more confusing, if I could play 15 complete changes per minute, meaning 30 chords per minute, I wouldn't set my metronome at 15 or at 30. I'd set it to 60bpm (beats per minute), tap my foot to that 60bpm tempo, and just change chords every 2nd beat.  That is exactly the same as "15 complete changes per minute".

Then in a single practice session I would try to move up from 60bpm (a new chord every other metronome tick/beat) to 64, to 68, to 72 until it all fell apart. Do a minute at 60bpm, then a minute at 64, etc. After it falls apart, I would drop back to 60, make sure that 60bpm still felt easy peasy, and try to push the tempo up again.

Next practice session 64bpm (i.e. 16 complete changes per minute) might feel easy.  Or you might plateau and be unable to get faster for a day or two. But after a week or so you should definitely look back and wonder how 15 complete changes per minute ever felt difficult. And eventually you'll get to your goal of 30 complete changes per minute, aka 60 chord changes per minute, aka 120bpm with chord changes every other beat.

Crank up that metronome, tap that foot, and keep practicing!
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Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #187 on: March 06, 2015, 04:51:50 pm »
Zapped I have to correct you on this.

This is a Quote From Justin's Lesson Page
Quote
Use the practice schedule (we'll look at this more in BC-119) and write down how many times you make the change each session. You will find that being able to watch your progress will really help keep you motivated. Count ‘1' for each change; so D–A–D–A = four changes.

When he explain the change as being 2 chords he starts telling the story of how he came up with
this exercise and state he use to have his student count the two chords as a full change.

Watch this video a the 2 minute mark where Justin is counting the changes he counts every chord
To do 30 changes and play 60 chords you would have to play A-D D-A A-D D-A and that is not what Justin
is doing. He is playing ADADADAD  Justin should edit everything he says from 3:16 second on. This is what
confuses every body and is irrelevant to the lesson. Up until that point in the lesson it is crystal clear
how to count the One Minute Change.





Offline Zapped

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #188 on: March 09, 2015, 07:10:01 pm »
Zapped I have to correct you on this.
:
Watch this video a the 2 minute mark where Justin is counting the changes he counts every chord
To do 30 changes and play 60 chords you would have to play A-D D-A A-D D-A and that is not what Justin
is doing. He is playing ADADADAD  Justin should edit everything he says from 3:16 second on. This is what
confuses every body and is irrelevant to the lesson. Up until that point in the lesson it is crystal clear
how to count the One Minute Change.






Hi stitch - I don't mind being corrected at all, but you'll have quote my previous reply and tell me where I'm disagreeing with BC-115. The 8 chords I wrote about in my reply, which can either be counted as 4 complete changes or 8 chord changes, are exactly what Justin was talking about at the 3m16s mark you mentioned.

I didn't think anyone ever suggested counting what you wrote ( A-D D-A A-D D-A ), since what you wrote has the student striking each chord twice. Justin never demos it that way in his video so I don't know where you're getting it from. You wrote (correctly) what Justin plays in the video ( "He is playing ADADADAD" ) which happens to be the exact 8-chord, 4-complete-changes example in my earlier reply.

Where do we (or Justin & I) disagree exactly? That's not my intent.
- Jim
Austin, TX

Offline KasperFauerby

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #189 on: March 10, 2015, 09:19:33 am »
Here is a thing to consider - it doesn't matter how you count it ;)

Doing exercises against a clock or metronome is a way for you to keep track of your own progress, so as long as you count the same way every time you practice you'll be ok. Do the exercise, write down your results and see how the number increases over time.

Your chord changes are fast enough when you're no longer struggling to play the songs you want to play.

Not trying to dismiss anyone's point of view here, only trying to offer some advice that might clear up the confusion for some..
« Last Edit: March 10, 2015, 09:48:41 am by KasperFauerby »

Offline pt3r

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #190 on: March 10, 2015, 09:43:12 am »
I can only agree, you need to get as fluent as suits your playing, this said, don't fool yourself by lowering your requirements when playing a song. If you play it (too) slow to justify your troublesome chord changes then be honest enough with yourself to keep on grinding on those changes. You will thank yourself later for sticking with it. Said the guy who still struggles making clean changes to and from the B7 chord.  ;D
You gotta put a lot o' time in that thing. (Buddy Guy)

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #191 on: March 10, 2015, 03:35:52 pm »
You are correct it doesn't matter how you count or keep track of your progress.
But it does matter when you need help or ask questions when having trouble.

Having two ways of counting the one minute change is confusing to beginners and
the people trying to help them. You need to remember the people who are on lesson
BC 115 have most likely just started playing. It is after all the 5th lesson of stage 1.

This is one of the most common question on the forum and people don't get clear answers
or they get conflicting answers.
Justin explains it very well on the first part of the video and he should leave it at that.
Like you said it doesn't matter how you count so why not just have one simple easy to
understand way for everyone?





 

Offline aakudaku

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #192 on: April 05, 2015, 12:39:29 am »
Hi I'm a newbie as well and I had a question. When I'm changing between chords (say A to D to A), the sound from my previous chord is still playing when I go to my new chord. I see in the video that somehow Justin is able to stop the sound from his previous chord from playing when he switches to the next chord. How does he do that? And also, when I keep my anchor finger on the string between chords, it drags on it and makes a high-pitched screech sound. How do I prevent that?
« Last Edit: April 05, 2015, 12:54:36 am by aakudaku »

Offline mike42

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #193 on: April 05, 2015, 01:09:55 am »
Hi aakudaku,

Welcome to the forum. There are many different ways to mute the strings using either your left or right hand, but at this point I wouldn't worry too much about all of that. It can be tricky and is covered later on, so right now just worry about getting those notes fretted cleanly.

When you say the sound is still playing, is it only the open string (5th string if you're playing A, 4th for D) or do all the strings ring out when you lift your fingers off? If it's only the one string, that's fine and you can hear it in Justin's video. If it's all the strings, you can focus on lifting your fingers cleanly to avoid them all starting to ring out.

To answer your 2nd question, you are probably still pressing down on that string when you change, correct? If you're applying pressure & your finger slides a bit, it'll cause that squeak. If you want to avoid it, let up on the pressure a bit when making the change.

I wouldn't suggest trying to incorporate these techniques into the 1 minute changes right away. Focus on making the changes very slowly to get the technique correct, and once you get it down try to apply them to this exercise. Since the point of the exercise is to improve speed, trying to apply a new skill without practicing it first will slow you down and likely cause some frustration.

Hope this helps!

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #194 on: April 05, 2015, 01:12:06 am »
Later on in the courses you will learn about string muting and keeping unwanted string ringing from happening.  At this stage I wouldn't worry too much about it.

For now I would focus on targeting the strings you want to play, 4 for the D, 5 for the A and 6 for the E.

As far as the squeak goes, slightly relax you finger as you shift it.  Again that is a subtly that will develop as you progress.

Shadow
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Offline aakudaku

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #195 on: April 05, 2015, 01:31:00 am »
Thanks, that explains it! Also, I had another question. Currently, whenever I try to do one-minute changes, I am forced to turn my head from my fretting hand to my strumming hand to make sure I'm doing each correctly. Is there any exercise to learn how to only strum the strings you need for a certain chord? For instance, I am looking at the fretboard and make a D chord, and then I have to look at the strumming hand to make sure I only get the lower 4 strings, etc. That makes me quite a bit slower.

Offline CRaZY BiTS

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #196 on: June 15, 2015, 11:47:57 am »
Hi there, I've been practicing guitar for a week and I'm struggling @ 1-minute changes. I'm picking up wrong strings and unclear notes. But I'm get pace as fast as 20. Please Help!!!!!!!!

Offline Boobook

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #197 on: June 15, 2015, 12:12:21 pm »
 Hi Crazy bits,

Slow down and concentrate on placing your fingers  correctly before pushing too fast on the one min changes. Yes it's about speed, but accuracy is more important. In one week of playing your fingers are still trying to work out what on earth you're asking them to do, let alone do it fast. Take your time, build the muscle memory and patterns first, then the speed will come.
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Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #198 on: June 15, 2015, 04:13:38 pm »
Try practicing one chord. Play any chord lift your fingers off put them back and play it again.
When you can do this with out missing any notes try taking your hand off the neck then place
it back to play the chord. When you can do this with no mistakes try taking your hands completely
off and touch your knee then back on and play the chord.


Offline iChow

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #199 on: July 26, 2015, 09:47:26 pm »
Hi, I've been playing for a week or so and learnt the A, D, and E chord. My chords from best to worst would be A, E, and then D. A chord I could do the strum-pick out-strum thing without any adjustments. E chord requires a bit of adjustment every time while D chord takes me a while to do the strum-pick out-strum thing. I was just wondering when should I progress to the 1 minute changes? Even if I progress should I only try to change between the chords I am comfortable with (A and E) or should I learn to switch between all the chords at once?

 

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