Author Topic: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes  (Read 186765 times)

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chronophasia

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #120 on: May 11, 2013, 08:23:31 pm »
I have seen great improvement with this exercise. The chords are 100% perfect and I still have a bad habit of looking where my strumming hand is landing(the strings and frets don't seem to be as bad). Although I have learned Am,Em, and Dm, I still feel like I should stick with the major chords first. Should I incorporate these into the routine now? I've been averaging about 30 switches lately. It'll probably take a while for me to get to 60 though.

Offline Charlatan30

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #121 on: May 13, 2013, 11:02:44 pm »
Hi, I've been practicing for around 3 months now and checking these forums every now and again.  I found it slightly frustrating to keep reading comments along the lines of 'don't worry it'll just happen' but it is SO true!  I've just had my eureka moment tonight and moved from around 40 strums a minute to over 60.  So I would encourage everyone to stick at it, because it will happen!

Offline Lucky_Luke

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #122 on: August 30, 2013, 10:05:57 am »
I manage to do 17-20 chord changes from D-A in a minute, what slows me down is that I need to look at my picking hand too to see if picking the right strings. I haven't figured out picking the strings without looking at them yet. I look at the fretting hand to get the finger placements on the strings correct and then I look at the picking hand to see if I'm picking the right strings. Is there a technique to learn picking the right strings without looking at them. Should I have learnt picking without looking when I was learning the chords? When I was learning the chords D,A & E , my focus was on the fingers and making the chords sound right. I never bothered about being able to pick without looking at the strings.

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #123 on: August 30, 2013, 03:56:53 pm »
Lucky_Luke  try practicing playing the bass note then strumming the chord with out looking.
When playing the A chord pluck the A string only then play the chord with out looking. If you hit the wrong
string don't play the chord and start over. Do it slowly for a few minutes every day and with in a couple
of days you will have it down. Do the same with the D chord. D string first then the chord. Use your ears
and not your eyes. You should also try not looking at your fretting hand let your ears tell you when your
doing it right or wrong.

Offline Dmon1Unlimited

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #124 on: September 07, 2013, 02:57:46 am »
So far it has been taking me some time to complete this exercise...

In order to play a chord adequately, i need to see what i am doing i.e. look at my fret hand when going into position and look at my strum hand. I end up with about 40 chord changes.

however, i can meet my target of 60 if i ignore my strum hand and focus on my fret hand (i.e. keep looking at my fretting hand when positioning my hand, and randomly strum)

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #125 on: September 07, 2013, 03:40:36 am »
(i.e. keep looking at my fretting hand when positioning my hand, and randomly strum)

The more you rely on your eyes the longer it will take to learn anything on guitar. Use your ears not your
eyes. Read the four posts above your post.

Offline Dmon1Unlimited

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #126 on: September 07, 2013, 10:16:49 pm »
Lucky_Luke  try practicing playing the bass note then strumming the chord with out looking.
When playing the A chord pluck the A string only then play the chord with out looking. If you hit the wrong
string don't play the chord and start over. Do it slowly for a few minutes every day and with in a couple
of days you will have it down. Do the same with the D chord. D string first then the chord. Use your ears
and not your eyes. You should also try not looking at your fretting hand let your ears tell you when your
doing it right or wrong.

erm, just to clarify what i should be doing:
first learn the string names: http://guitar.about.com/od/freebeginnerlessons/ss/guitar_lesson_two_3.htm
then:

1)hold the guitar, dont touch any strings
2)strum A string without looking
3) look at string that was strummed
      3a)if correct string is strummed, then position fret hand to play A chord without looking
               3ai)strum chord
               3aii)check if correct strings were pressed down with fret hand
               3aiii)repeat step 1 onwards again
      3b)if wrong, repeat step 1 onwards again
« Last Edit: September 07, 2013, 10:49:50 pm by Dmon1Unlimited »

Offline countryguy87

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #127 on: September 12, 2013, 12:27:28 pm »
Just got done with my first week of playing guitar.  I have practiced every day from anywhere between 1-2 hours each day split into 15-30 min. sessions.  Currently at 82 from D to A, 83 from A to E, and 60 from E to D.  I've pretty much been solely practicing chord changes during each practice session.

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #128 on: September 12, 2013, 05:14:26 pm »


erm, just to clarify what i should be doing:
first learn the string names: http://guitar.about.com/od/freebeginnerlessons/ss/guitar_lesson_two_3.htm
then:

1)hold the guitar, dont touch any strings
2)strum A string without looking
3) look at string that was strummed
      3a)if correct string is strummed, then position fret hand to play A chord without looking
               3ai)strum chord
               3aii)check if correct strings were pressed down with fret hand
               3aiii)repeat step 1 onwards again
      3b)if wrong, repeat step 1 onwards again

Your making it more complicated than it need to be. Let's use the A chord as and example.
Fret the A chord. If you need to look then look. Now that your fingering is correct look away from the
strings. Play the A string with out looking. If you've played the A string correctly strum the whole chord.
If you played the E or D string find the A string and play it. If you can do all this with out looking move
on to the D chord. This will help with your accuracy and your Ears will learn what the notes sound like.
You may have to look to make sure you are doing it right but the less you look the faster you'll improve.

Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #129 on: September 13, 2013, 01:09:08 am »
Personally, I think an absolute beginner is only making it harder by not looking at their fretting hand to learn their chords.

Yes, they might end up relying less on sight earlier than others, but progress will be much slower, and take longer to get onto playing simple songs. This will frustrate many people IMO.

I preferred to learn my chords by sight and let the muscle memory tae over with practice and repetition. Without 'learning' how to do it, I can find and form any open chords (and a few barres) by feel.

Offline bradt

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #130 on: September 13, 2013, 04:31:36 am »
Personally, I think an absolute beginner is only making it harder by not looking at their fretting hand to learn their chords.

^ that

Look at your hand while you play. That's fine. When we first learned to tie our shoes we looked very closely at the process as we did it. Now most of us can do it blindfolded without a second thought.

I found the same thing to happen with playing guitar. Eventually you just start looking round naturally. It just happens on its own.

Offline Dr Winterbourne

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #131 on: September 13, 2013, 06:23:00 pm »
Just got done with my first week of playing guitar.  I have practiced every day from anywhere between 1-2 hours each day split into 15-30 min. sessions.  Currently at 82 from D to A, 83 from A to E, and 60 from E to D.  I've pretty much been solely practicing chord changes during each practice session.

60 would be fine. You don't need to change that fast yet, as if you just began your strumming wont be that fast yet, especially if you spent all your time on just one aspect. Check the consolidation list for Stage one, because you can do ADE, so maybe time to add some more chords.

Do not over specialize yet; practice chord change speed, yes, but also strumming, and chord accuracy (strum pick strum), aural training and songs. Start on the songs straight away. Just trust the course.
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Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #132 on: September 13, 2013, 07:04:14 pm »


I preferred to learn my chords by sight and let the muscle memory tae over with practice and repetition. Without 'learning' how to do it, I can find and form any open chords (and a few barres) by feel.

How good are you at learning by ear? You'd be a lot better at it if you used your ear to learn your chords
and not your eye. When you where first learning how many times did you look at your fingers to fret a
chord then strum that chord an it was wrong? I see that happen with beginners all the time. Your ears
never lie but your eyes do. I'm not saying never look, when I'm learning new chords I still look but the
sooner you stop relying on your eye the faster you learn the chord.

Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #133 on: September 14, 2013, 01:57:02 am »
How good are you at learning by ear? You'd be a lot better at it if you used your ear to learn your chords
and not your eye. When you where first learning how many times did you look at your fingers to fret a
chord then strum that chord an it was wrong?

I used both. My ear sucks though, as I've not done any of the ear training, which I should have.

When playing and not looking I can tell instantly if I've missed a chord slightly. I don't miss by much, but it's obvious. I still use both when learning new chords.

I'm not disputing it's an important skill, but beginners need to decide if they're going to do it - it will slow them down significantly, and some people will prefer the skill to evolve naturally.

I don't have the time or patience to be a really good musician as well, I got 3 kids a FT job and help my wife run a family business. I want to play stuff I enjoy. If that means watching the fretboard more regularly than others, then I can live with that.

Offline Dmon1Unlimited

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Re: BC-115 • 1 Minute Changes
« Reply #134 on: September 14, 2013, 04:46:38 am »
Should you ideally be playing till your fingers hurt?

I want to keep playing till this happens but I always come short because of my wrist getting uncomfortable. I can only play a couple minutes before it gets uncomfortable. It seems like this issue is hindering me from getting the most out of my sessions and making this longer to learn than expected

I've been doing some twisting exercises (holding a book and doing about 50 reps of twisting) but I'm not sure it's working (though I've only started it recently). I also tried to alter my hand placement (when switching between A and E fretting, by having my thumb parallel to the neck instead of perpendicular). This helps although I don't know if this is bad practice

 

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