Author Topic: BC-112 • The A Chord  (Read 105794 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline nickbay

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 4
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #50 on: February 12, 2016, 05:44:26 pm »
On the A chord, my 1st finger has an indented line on it from practicing.
This makes it very difficult to make the G (3rd) string ring out correctly.
The more I practice the deeper it gets and the worse it sounds.
It is starting to form a bit of a callus.
What now?

Offline stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5449
  • Good Vibes 247
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2016, 06:34:57 pm »
Don't press that hard. You only need as much pressure as it takes to make the note ring clean.

On a well set-up guitar that is a lot less than people thing.
Calluses are part of guitar playing. If yours has a permanent grove sand it down with an emery board.

If you have to press hard to make the notes ring out clean get your guitar set-up properly.

Offline AshKyrie

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
  • Cats are good.
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #52 on: February 16, 2016, 06:05:02 am »
Okay so here's the deal, i just started playing (2 days ago, to be exact), and i've tuned my guitar, can play the d chord pretty well, but i'm having trouble with the a chord, my fingers seem kinda too big to fit, I can't get my index finger low enough to avoid the buzzing,everything else is fine though, now I know it'll get easier and all once my fingertips get harder, but here's my question, should I go on to the next lesson while my fingertips get harder or should I stay on this one until I can play it without the buzzing?  :-\

Edit: Also hey, I'm Ash, nice to meet you all.  :)
If life ain't just a joke then why are we laughing?

Offline derek.knight

  • Pub Night Playa
  • ***
  • Posts: 166
  • Good Vibes 4
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #53 on: February 16, 2016, 07:03:43 am »
Hi Ash, welcome to the forum. I started playing a few months ago and rushed through the first few lessons. I didn't perfect any of the chords, but I also remembered that I had not perfected them. So I didn't kid myself that I was great at the easy chords, then get so far ahead that I would get discouraged. I think I learned A,D & E, which gave me enough to do some simple songs. Then I worked on getting them better. I was probably a few weeks before I was on the minor chords. Initially I could only practice for 10 mins or so before my fingers hurt a lot. After a month I guess, my fingers were calloused enough that they didn't hurt, and I could practice for an hour, which I still do every day.

So a few key things. It doesn't happen instantly, you don't magically become Clapton (or even Sid Vicious). But practice and it will happen, quicker than you think. Second. This is my experience. Everyone is different, so don't feel that because it works for me, you must do what I did.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Offline Rossco01

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2673
  • Good Vibes 116
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #54 on: February 16, 2016, 08:28:42 am »
The only thing I'd add is make sure you mix structured practice in with learning songs. Even at this early stage learning songs with those three chords will bring you on as much as just practicing the lessons. Above all it will keep you honest and give you a better assessment of where you are than just being able to do the lessons....after all you want to learn guitar so you can play songs.
Epiphone Masterbilt DR500MCE, Yamaha Pacifica 112V, HB Tele, Fender Mustang 1v2, Katana 100, Trio Plus, Boss GT1
Follow me on >> https://soundcloud.com/rossco01
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHlzgAndj0AFFSNE1iGnbQQ

Offline Katia

  • Bedroom Rocker
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #55 on: February 21, 2016, 05:37:25 am »
Agreeing with the above re: playing actual songs.  I find with most things (whether it's music or learning languages or anything else) that I progress a lot faster if I also actually put it into use rather than doing only isolated drills over and over (and psychologically it's a lot less boring).

Offline Purple Turtle

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #56 on: August 28, 2016, 08:02:57 pm »
This chord is giving me a slight amount of grief. I can pick each string individualy with no buzz, so I feel fairly sure my fingering is well, but when I go to strum the chord, the higher attack from my pick seems to make the high E vibrate on my ring finger slightly. The string still sounds though I feel I still shouldn't be touching the string at all. I've tried altering my finger position, but it's pretty much at a 90 degree angle now already. I'm using the tip of my finger, so I'm not sure what to do >.<

I do feel this isn't such a song-breaking finger position as I did state it still rings.

I'm playing an Epiphone Les Paul Standard.

Offline ajc24

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 50
  • Good Vibes 1
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #57 on: September 05, 2016, 08:07:35 pm »
I can pick each string individualy with no buzz, so I feel fairly sure my fingering is well, but when I go to strum the chord, the higher attack from my pick seems to make the high E vibrate on my ring finger slightly.

This plagued me, too, on the early chords (I'm only just on Stage 3 so am barely ahead of you as regards the work I've covered). I found that as my fingers hardened up, this happened much less and now rarely happens at all.

Give it time. Once your fingers toughen up, I think you'll find that this won't happen as much / any more.

Offline Joerfe

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2926
  • Good Vibes 108
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #58 on: September 06, 2016, 08:21:59 am »
Like AJC24  I suggest that it will come in time, but a good thing that you are aware of the issue.
When you are in the early stages of learning the guitar many tilts the guitar towards themselves to see what is going on at the fretboard. This position exposes the high e (1st string) to both your fretting hand and you also tend to hit that particular string a bit harder than the other strings.
/Jesper

Sigma SOMR28H, Fender Classic '50s Tele, Tokai Les Paul Reborn 2010, Gibson Les Paul Standard Faded TB 'Slash specs'.
Boss GT-1000, Line6 Powercab 100

Offline Purple Turtle

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #59 on: September 07, 2016, 07:49:29 pm »
This plagued me, too, on the early chords (I'm only just on Stage 3 so am barely ahead of you as regards the work I've covered). I found that as my fingers hardened up, this happened much less and now rarely happens at all.

Give it time. Once your fingers toughen up, I think you'll find that this won't happen as much / any more.

I think this makes sense, as it does appear to get worse over time. I found a little work around but I feel this might even make things worse for me. If I angle my finger downwards, there's less room for the finger to touch, but this also means bringing my wrist forward, which I feel makes things so much worse.

It is really sucky that the only finger that wants to harden is the index finger you wouldn't want to get on the wrong side of, but the others are still as soft of kittens >.< I suppose it's best to just power through it!

This hangup has been a really massive downfall for me. I've been getting so angry at the A chord that I just stay on it. Every other chord in the first three stages is fine and even E based barre chords aren't such an issue (Just need that slightly extra strength on the push down and I'm there) while the A based barre chords are coming in.

I'm not very good at changing either, I think this is probably the issue of always looking at where I'm putting my fingers so I don't pay much attention on getting things fast.

Like AJC24  I suggest that it will come in time, but a good thing that you are aware of the issue.
When you are in the early stages of learning the guitar many tilts the guitar towards themselves to see what is going on at the fretboard. This position exposes the high e (1st string) to both your fretting hand and you also tend to hit that particular string a bit harder than the other strings.

This also makes sense, as I've already pointed out, I do find myself looking down at the strings, though I did make a conscious effort to try to move me guitar to be more perpendicular to me as I thought that was the more correct way of doing it. Would I be making a mistake? I stopped trying to play sitting down as I've got a bed which always made me touch my leg anyway so figured that was a bad idea, so just continued to play standing up.

Offline Jekzik

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #60 on: January 04, 2017, 02:58:42 pm »
Hi All!

This chord is causing me some serious grief.  D was really easy for me but A is causing me untold frustration after practicing it for about a week solid I still cannot seem to form it in a manner that is comfortable for my hand and that also makes the G string ring clearly.   Essentially what is happening is I will place my index finger on G somewhere in the center or slightly behind the middle.  Slide my middle finger over my index and place it on D.  I have no problems with this stage.

The problem then comes in when I try to place my ring finger on B.  It's a really tight fit so when I try to force the ring finger in, my index can no longer stay curved/pointed straight down at the string to hold it down straight.  Instead, my index is getting sort of forced either back the string, which I try to compensate for by pressing harder to keep it in place.  When I do that, it stays in place but it starts to form an awkward angle and I end up playing the G string from the side of my finger and doesn't look correct and doesn't feel comfortable.  After forming this death grip to compensate my finger sliding it's starting to cause me some pain in the first join right above my finger nail so I've decided to quit playing for a few days to fix that.

My fingers tips no longer hurt as calluses have started to form, but mostly the pain is in the index fingers first joint.  To compensate for that awkward angle I then try to move my hand/thumb but it throws my wrist into a position that's not straight/natural.  Overall, this chord has me in a rut and I'm not sure how to correct this.  The only way I can seem to play it remotely correctly positioned is if I have my index finger in the very back of the fret but I then have to press incredibly hard to make it ring out.  Any advise/guidance?  Thanks!

Offline Drubbing

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3273
  • Good Vibes 104
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #61 on: January 04, 2017, 03:05:29 pm »
A week? you're going to have to adjust expectations. Some chords take longer than others. Wait til the F - that's usually a 6 month project for most.

As you've found out, you're pressing way too hard, and is counter productive.

The answer is to relax and stop trying to force it. With practice your fingers will find a way to slot in. They always do.

Offline skinnyT

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 81
  • Good Vibes 3
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #62 on: January 04, 2017, 07:22:13 pm »
I have been playing 7 months now and am on stage 5. It took me a month to do stage 1. The A chord still causes me grief on occasion . Try putting your fingers down in a different order. What worked best for me was to get the middle and ring fingers down then push your index finger behind them as close as it will go. Hope this makes sense.

Offline SiegeFrog

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 528
  • Good Vibes 18
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #63 on: January 04, 2017, 09:07:05 pm »
Like skinnyT said, your goal is to get all three fingers as close to the fret as possible. Squish more. It can help to focus on moving your 2nd and 3rd fingers apart more to make more room for your index finger. A couple of mm of width will give your index finger a lot more space. Also, as your fingertips toughen up more, they'll spread less making it less likely that you touch adjacent strings. Keep squishing and practicing. Focus a lot on the strum pick out strum exercise.


Sent from my iPhone using JustinGuitar Community mobile app
Fender Squier Affinity HSS Stratocaster
Fender Mustang 1
Seagull Maritime SWS CW SG QI

Started BC January, 2014, Completed May, 2015

Offline Jekzik

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 2
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #64 on: January 04, 2017, 10:52:48 pm »
Thanks for all of the insight! I'll take this all to heart and keep working on it.

Sent from my SM-G930V using newbielink:http://r.tapatalk.com/byo?rid=93296 [nonactive]


Offline MyKindaMoves

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #65 on: August 06, 2017, 07:54:03 pm »
Whenever I play an A chord my wrist is being stretched in a really uncomfortable manner to accommodate it. I believe it's because I've got very petite hands and I'm playing on a full sized guitar although this could be complete hogwash.

Do any other small handed guitar players have trouble with the A chord?


Because my hands are small I have to put my thumb really low on the neck or otherwise my hand ends up pressing on the bottom string, Then cos it's half way down the neck I have to press abit to keep it in place, all in all it's just a very awkward chord for me. I can play it but not for longer than a few minutes. I'm thinking I need a 3/4 sized guitar instead or am i just being silly? I'm sure plenty of girls with small hands can play on a full sized guitar

Here are some pictures of my straining playing it:

Offline stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5449
  • Good Vibes 247
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #66 on: August 06, 2017, 08:04:27 pm »
You have you guitar to flat. Lift the neck up on an angle so you're not cranking your wrist.
There's nothing wrong witn your hands it's your technique. Your wrist should be as straight as possible.

Offline DavidP

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6883
  • Good Vibes 365
  • You're always learning about guitars-Keef Richards
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #67 on: August 06, 2017, 08:16:20 pm »
Don't have too much experience but from the picture it looks like the thumb is pressing really hard.  You may be using more force than is  necessary. Try easing off and use just enough pressure to let the note sound true.

As stitch suggests, experiment with position and posture to be able to be totally relaxed as you play.  It may be just the camera angle but looks like the neck may be angling away.

Keep at it, till you solve it.

Offline Drubbing

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3273
  • Good Vibes 104
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #68 on: August 07, 2017, 12:56:16 am »
Small hands big guitar is just an excuse. Don't go there. As advised bring the neck up, like classical players do. This will allow you to drop the arm and play with a straighter wrist.

And you need to let go of the death grip on the thumb. You will develop wrist injury trying to do that.

Offline joshguitar

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 1
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #69 on: September 17, 2017, 05:27:44 pm »
I have trouble muting the low E and letting the high E ring at the same time. My palm will hit the high E, so I'll move it off the neck, but then I can't reach my thumb onto the low E. If I put my thumb on the low E, my palm hits the high E.

The only solution I can see is when strumming to not hit the low E, but I don't really see how this is feasible when doing faster/harder strumming.

Any suggestions?

Offline Rossco01

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2673
  • Good Vibes 116
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #70 on: September 17, 2017, 05:39:46 pm »
It's been a long time since I learnt the A chord so can't remember Justin's advice on muting the low E. what I can tell you is that with practice you will be able to skip the the low E and play just those 5 strings and you'll be able to do it fast and without looking. If you think A is hard then D is the same, just D, G, B and high E. all it needs is constant steady and initially slow practice.
Epiphone Masterbilt DR500MCE, Yamaha Pacifica 112V, HB Tele, Fender Mustang 1v2, Katana 100, Trio Plus, Boss GT1
Follow me on >> https://soundcloud.com/rossco01
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHlzgAndj0AFFSNE1iGnbQQ

Offline dakadama

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 4
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #71 on: February 10, 2018, 07:18:29 pm »
hi. I have never played a guitar before and I love your lessons. I have started right from the beginning and received your Beginner's Course and Beginner's Songbook as gifts. I have been trying to practice 10 to 15 minutes every day. I am still struggling with the 1 Minute Changes. Especially playing the A chord.
I can't get it to consistently sound good. If I concentrate I can play a Good A chord but once I start the
1 Minute Changes at least half of them don't sound good. Any suggestions? Just keep practicing and be patient? My son is studying to become a Luthier and is making my wife and I a guitar that he wants us to play and not just display. So I really want to be able to play.
     Your lessons are great!! I just can't seem to get past where I am stuck.
Thank you for your help

Offline joueur de guitare

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
  • Good Vibes 37
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #72 on: February 10, 2018, 07:40:31 pm »
Just keep practicing and be patient?

That. How long have you been playing?

Plus you're old, and learning new things don't come quite as easy as they did when you were 20. But what do I know? I'm only a kid of 62. :)
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Offline dakadama

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 4
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #73 on: February 10, 2018, 07:44:45 pm »
About 3 Months

Offline LP

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 4
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #74 on: February 11, 2018, 10:38:43 am »
Hi!
I'm no pro, just a beginner :)
I think you should identify the faulty string(s) when your A chord sound dirty, then you can find the solution and concentrate specifically on it when you strum it.

Also A chord can be a struggle despite it's newby status me think: if you got big fingers or if your scratch has a thin neck with strings very close to each others.
So, don't get stuck on the first chapter only because of that. Move on to the other chapter if you didn't do it already, you'll improve your A chord while working on others things also.

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App