Author Topic: BC-112 • The A Chord  (Read 105784 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline joueur de guitare

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
  • Good Vibes 37
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #100 on: February 03, 2019, 01:53:21 pm »
I'm having one hell of a time with the A chord. It all has to do with my first finger on the G string. I just can't seem to get it far enough away from the fret to not buzz.

You want your fingers close to the frets as possible, not further away.

The A chord is a bit cramped though.
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Offline spinsheet

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
    • Bicycling off the beaten path
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #101 on: February 03, 2019, 11:23:14 pm »
I'm wondering if the A will be easier to play once the calluses have built up. Should I not worry too much about it for now as I have almost no calluses built up as I haven't played in over three years?

I should probably change my strings as they've been sitting on the guitar for years, I'll move to lighter strings then and see if that helps any.

Offline spinsheet

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
    • Bicycling off the beaten path
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #102 on: February 04, 2019, 04:27:39 pm »
You want your fingers close to the frets as possible, not further away.

The A chord is a bit cramped though.

I should have been more clear. When I said I couldn't get my finger further away from the fret, I meant the first fret, not the second. My other two fingers crowd it out and I can't get it further down the neck, away from the first fret and closer to the second.

Offline hilts17

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1102
  • Good Vibes 61
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #103 on: February 04, 2019, 04:54:04 pm »
Are you fingering the A chord using Justin's suggested fingering technique? Are your fingers thick and you feel there is no room in the fret? See this link below.

https://www.tomasmichaud.com/a-chord-fat-fingers/

Note this paragraph: "even though students think that there's some physical problem keeping them from playing guitar, it often is more about underestimating what they can do with practice."

Regarding your strings being on your guitar for years, yes they are long overdue to be changed.
Martin D28
Seagull S6 Original
Seagull Entourage CW Black QI
Seagull Coastline 12 String
Yamaha Pacifica 112

Offline spinsheet

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
    • Bicycling off the beaten path
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #104 on: February 04, 2019, 07:29:32 pm »
Are you fingering the A chord using Justin's suggested fingering technique?

Yes, I'm using Justin's fingering technique. I figure he knows a lot more about this than I do!

I do have rather big hands so I imagine my fingers are probably a bit thicker that most, but I'm sure it's nothing I can't work around, they're not THAT big  :)


Offline joueur de guitare

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
  • Good Vibes 37
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #105 on: February 04, 2019, 07:36:55 pm »
You'll probably find the A mini barre easier, but carry on with the open A until you reach Stage 4. :)
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Online stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5449
  • Good Vibes 247
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #106 on: February 04, 2019, 08:07:30 pm »
To quote myself.

Try 2 fingers to cover the three strings. Either the index and second or second
and ring. Been playing my open A like that for over 40 years. Don't let anyone
tell you it's wrong. Or you can barre all three string with one finger. Just don't
play the high e string or mute it.both methods are perfectly Okay.

Offline spinsheet

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
    • Bicycling off the beaten path
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #107 on: February 05, 2019, 01:47:33 pm »
I replaced my strings with 11's (can't help but think of Spinal Tap when I say that) and that seems to have helped a bit, at least I can hit a decent A chord half the time instead of one out of five. I guess three years is long enough for one set of strings. Of course, I haven't played the guitar for those three years, but still.

Anyway, thanks all for the advise.

Offline Peakoverload

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 36
  • Good Vibes 3
  • How does Gilmour make it look so effortless!
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #108 on: February 18, 2019, 02:46:50 pm »
Apologies if this is a bit of a dumb question but I'm having a few problems with unlearning some stuff.

I started to try and teach myself guitar from a book nearly 20 years ago but didn't get very far and ended up giving up. I've recently decided to try again but this time following Justin's Beginner Course which I'm already finding so much easier. The problem I'm having is that I previously learned and can still remember how to play most open chords (except F and B which always evaded me and still does) and the way I learned the A chord was 1st finger 4th string, 2nd finger 3rd, 3rd finger 2nd. I can absolutely see the benefit of Justin's method and if I'm very slowly switching between D and A I can do it but as soon as I start to speed up the changes my fingers get in the way and I can't do it. If however I use the fingering for the A chord I originally learned I can change between D and A very quickly and kinda feels more natural. I kinda like having to take my fingers off all strings as leaving one behind seems to complicate it in my brain.

So the question is, is it okay to keep using the original fingering position I learned or should I concentrate on unlearning that and switch to Justin's?

The other problem I'm having is the thumb position of my left hand (right handed player). I know Justin says to have your thumb on the back of the guitar but I'm really struggling with that. I have large hands and my thumb naturally wants to roll over the top. If I force my thumb to the back of the neck a number of things happen:

1. My fingers start to ache after a while
2. My accuracy of finger placement drops quite a bit
3. My thumb aches quite quickly
4. After a couple of chord changes, my thumb has rolled back on top again.

I know it's necessary to persevere with this as correct thumb position helps with barring which I always found utterly impossible so does anyone have any tips/advice/exercises on how to keep my thumb on the back of the neck short of super gluing it there?

Offline DavidP

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 6883
  • Good Vibes 365
  • You're always learning about guitars-Keef Richards
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #109 on: February 18, 2019, 03:29:19 pm »
Apologies if this is a bit of a dumb question but I'm having a few problems with unlearning some stuff.

I started to try and teach myself guitar from a book nearly 20 years ago but didn't get very far and ended up giving up. I've recently decided to try again but this time following Justin's Beginner Course which I'm already finding so much easier. The problem I'm having is that I previously learned and can still remember how to play most open chords (except F and B which always evaded me and still does) and the way I learned the A chord was 1st finger 4th string, 2nd finger 3rd, 3rd finger 2nd. I can absolutely see the benefit of Justin's method and if I'm very slowly switching between D and A I can do it but as soon as I start to speed up the changes my fingers get in the way and I can't do it. If however I use the fingering for the A chord I originally learned I can change between D and A very quickly and kinda feels more natural. I kinda like having to take my fingers off all strings as leaving one behind seems to complicate it in my brain.

So the question is, is it okay to keep using the original fingering position I learned or should I concentrate on unlearning that and switch to Justin's?

The other problem I'm having is the thumb position of my left hand (right handed player). I know Justin says to have your thumb on the back of the guitar but I'm really struggling with that. I have large hands and my thumb naturally wants to roll over the top. If I force my thumb to the back of the neck a number of things happen:

1. My fingers start to ache after a while
2. My accuracy of finger placement drops quite a bit
3. My thumb aches quite quickly
4. After a couple of chord changes, my thumb has rolled back on top again.

I know it's necessary to persevere with this as correct thumb position helps with barring which I always found utterly impossible so does anyone have any tips/advice/exercises on how to keep my thumb on the back of the neck short of super gluing it there?

Welcome to the Community.  No dumb questions ...

I can't help with the thumb position question.

As for A: I play it that old traditional way as well.  And I am lucky enough to have had a lesson with Justin and he never raised that as a problem.

If you are not struggling to change between the A D & E then I'd not worry about this.

I also find it easier to lift the middle finger to play an A7 ... middle finger and "middle" string of the the three.  And to slide the ring finger into the 3rd fret.

I said no dumb questions, but sometimes you get dumb answers ... hopefully this is not one that is dumb through overlooking some future issue yet to be discovered by playing A as you are.

Offline gerrymac

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #110 on: February 20, 2019, 11:03:56 pm »
Thanks for answer, David P.    Like Peakoverload, I am unlearning an A chord fingering, in my case 234---which Justin specifically advises against in one of his Stage 1 videos.   But sounds like I can use 234 and move on in course--though maybe keep practicing Justin's preferred 213?

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14080
  • Good Vibes 627
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #111 on: February 21, 2019, 08:32:22 am »
I use

1, 2, 3

2, 3, 4

2, 1, 3

1---1

depending on where I'm coming from and where I'm going to and whether I need to play any embellishments on the A chord (A sus2, Asus4 or A slash chords etc).

Offline sdd56

  • Pub Night Playa
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
  • Good Vibes 5
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #112 on: February 21, 2019, 10:11:42 am »
I really don't like the A chord. I've been learning using Justin's course for 2.5 years (but still consider myself a beginner).

Using fingers 213, I struggle to get a consistent clean chord, unless I really press hard with my index, which tends to limit speed of chord changes. obviously I try to get as close to the fret as possible, but the other fingers mean that my index is usually roughly halfway between frets. The acoustic I'm currently using has a fairly low action.

Using 123 or 234, I find it difficult to fit all fingers in, especially further up when using a capo. I have average size fingers.

I've tried using single finger barre, but the sound of that muted high e string just makes the chord sound wrong to me.

And even when I play the chord cleanly, e.g. using 213, I just don't like the sound of the chord, it sounds dull compared to other chords.

I much prefer the sound of A7 or Am, which I find I can use as a substitute in some cases.

Is substitution likely to be a valid solution, or should I persist and master the A even if I don't like the sound?

I think I know the answer already but any comments/tips would be much appreciated!
Stan
Started BC Sept 2016.
Acoustic: Yamaha F310, Washburn WD7, Freshman FA1AN, Taylor GS Mini
Electric: Epiphone Les Paul Standard Pro
https://soundcloud.com/user-372122422
aka Stan

Offline DarrellW

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3911
  • Good Vibes 195
  • Black country bloke, ijut intollerant 😂
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #113 on: February 21, 2019, 10:38:16 am »
What you could do is look at other shapes of the chord or using triads (only 3 strings), it might be that you’re not ready for this idea yet but if you’re having so much trouble maybe worth a look see.
Really the best thing to do is persevere and get it right but don’t let it hold up your progress just for the sake of one chord!
Still here, still learning - no longer letting Fibromyalgia get in the way, it sucks but doesn’t have to mean your life stops!

Offline Drtbker

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #114 on: April 25, 2019, 06:48:06 pm »
This about my 3rd day learning lesson 1. I’m able to play A,D,E but when I try and change to A I just can’t seem to get finger 1 to go in the right spot without being on the fret to dull it out. What have you learned to  help get that finger in there more? I know I’m still new and just starting but the other cords I’m able to play and not have any issues now and transition from E and D with out issues.  Which is awesome cause I thought it would take me a lot longer to get it down.

Thank you for the help everyone!

Offline jono

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 581
  • Good Vibes 26
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #115 on: April 25, 2019, 07:06:11 pm »
There are no tricks, just keep at it and you will get there. Three days is good to be able to do E to D changes that you are happy with.

Sent from my [device_name] using JustinGuitar Community mobile app


Offline joueur de guitare

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 826
  • Good Vibes 37
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #116 on: April 25, 2019, 07:12:55 pm »
This about my 3rd day learning lesson 1.

Patience, and practice. And developing muscle memory. :)

There's not a lot of space to get three fingers down, as you've discovered.

If you haven't watched the vid, do. It's here.

https://www.justinguitar.com/guitar-lessons/the-a-chord-bc-112

Put finger 1 down first, a little way back from the fret. Strum. If it's clean fret the other two strings. Pick each string in turn. If the B string isn't good, adjust and repeat.
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Offline savarezguy

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 54
  • Good Vibes 7
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #117 on: April 25, 2019, 08:10:32 pm »
I did have the same issue once and figured out some ways to deal with it. I forced the fingers a bit larger distance to stretch the placement. I alternate between correct placement (which obviously is a little off) and the "stretch" (which often hit the correct position). After some time I didn't have to think about it anymore since the placement converged between what my mind thought was right and the stretch which was correct, but my mind didn't think so.




Offline hilts17

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1102
  • Good Vibes 61
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #118 on: April 25, 2019, 08:26:45 pm »
You're doing great for only 3 days of practising. It's just going to take more practice, practice, practice. You'll get it just like we all did.
Martin D28
Seagull S6 Original
Seagull Entourage CW Black QI
Seagull Coastline 12 String
Yamaha Pacifica 112

Offline Drtbker

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 6
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #119 on: April 25, 2019, 08:43:38 pm »
Yeah I’m very happy with the progress I’ve made. It actually surprised me how quick I was able to get the cords down. I’ll just keep practicing the A cord. Maybe get a  few songs to practice with and see if it just starts coming to me.

Offline sairfingers

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1609
  • Good Vibes 93
  • 󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿“Keep that one, mark it fab”. Paul McCartney.
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #120 on: April 25, 2019, 10:37:46 pm »
Hi Drtbekr.
I recommend you buy Justin’s Beginner Songbook. Loads of A, E, D songs in there. His songbooks are great, lots of hints and tips in them, not just the lyrics and chords like most other sources.
Studying Intermediate Course, Folk Fingerstyle and Blues modules.
Pickin’ an’ lickin’.....😎.
Martin D28 : Gibson SG : Boss Katana 50.

Offline Liebie

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 1
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #121 on: July 09, 2019, 07:54:29 pm »
After 2 months of practice I still battle with the A major cord. How can I solve this problem or must I just give it up as a bad job.

Sent from my [device_name] using newbielink:http://JustinGuitar Community mobile app [nonactive]


Online stitch101

  • All Time Legend
  • *******
  • Posts: 5449
  • Good Vibes 247
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #122 on: July 09, 2019, 08:07:31 pm »
Could you be more specific at what the problem is.
Hard to help if we don't know what it is.
Have you tried different fingering?

Offline GermanGuitarNoob

  • Bedroom Rocker
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #123 on: September 23, 2019, 02:57:19 am »
Is there any harm in using the 2nd finger on the G-String, the 3rd on the D-String and the pinky on the B-String? It is basically the way Justin plays it but one finger "up".

I can play an A very good... but only with the thumb behind the fretboard. I am now trying to learn the chords with muting unnessecary strings. I am pretty good with all the chords who need muting now, the D, the C, the Am, the Dm... but the damned A is a problem.

I can do it but only if I turn my wrist in a very awkward position (otherwise I block the e-String) and after a few practice strumms it is beginning to get sore. Sometimes it even hurts a bit.

Last night I tried the position which I described at the start of the post. And it was like magic... the e-String ringed like a bell in my ears and I didnt have to turn the wrist. The E-String was muted with my thumb comfortably.
It even felt natural. I could change to a D or an E pretty quick after a few times I practiced the new position. You lose the "anchor finger" for the A-D-E changes of course but I can live with that. I felt more comfortably with lifting the fingers for this chord changes anyway... I don´t know why.

I know the answer to that question myself. For guitars it is: Whatever floats your boat and sounds good. But I used this fingering for an Am chord too and noticed while playing that you need the pinky for sus and add-chords sometimes. So I am a bit afraid of learning a mistake.

This A-Chord with a muted E-String is the only basic chord I have problems with. I can even play bar-chords very good.

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 14080
  • Good Vibes 627
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BC-112 • The A Chord
« Reply #124 on: September 23, 2019, 07:16:58 am »
Is there any harm in using the 2nd finger on the G-String, the 3rd on the D-String and the pinky on the B-String? It is basically the way Justin plays it but one finger "up".

This is not a good way to learn the A chord at all as it makes it impossible to play extensions / embellishments. It will harm your long term progress and ability to play many songs and riffs.

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App