Author Topic: BC-111 • The D Chord  (Read 121442 times)

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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #75 on: December 03, 2015, 11:45:20 pm »
In the big ole for what it's worth department, I interpreted it to mean "touching" as in "would be muting if" not for being fretted higher up.

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Offline m_c

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #76 on: December 03, 2015, 11:52:12 pm »
That does not make sense.
How can your 1st finger on fret 2 mute the note your 3rd finger is playing on fret 3?
You can not mute a fretted note from a position behind where it is fretted.

I suspect Jamin is aware that his 1st finger is touching the 2nd string and is worried it's a bad thing to have happen, but given the 2nd string is fretted higher up, it doesn't actually affect the chord.
It probably isn't a good thing, but as long as the chord sounds clear, I wouldn't be worried about it at this point.

As you practice and learn more chords, you'll gradually improve finger position, and be able to make the slight corrections needed to get the required strings to ring out clearly.
I know when I play a C, I have a habit of my 2nd finger catching the 5th string, but it doesn't affect what I'm playing. I probably should work on it not happening, but it's not a problem for now.

Offline JaminCat

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #77 on: December 04, 2015, 08:11:34 am »
In the big ole for what it's worth department, I interpreted it to mean "touching" as in "would be muting if" not for being fretted higher up.

Shadow

I suspect Jamin is aware that his 1st finger is touching the 2nd string and is worried it's a bad thing to have happen, but given the 2nd string is fretted higher up, it doesn't actually affect the chord.
It probably isn't a good thing, but as long as the chord sounds clear, I wouldn't be worried about it at this point.

As you practice and learn more chords, you'll gradually improve finger position, and be able to make the slight corrections needed to get the required strings to ring out clearly.
I know when I play a C, I have a habit of my 2nd finger catching the 5th string, but it doesn't affect what I'm playing. I probably should work on it not happening, but it's not a problem for now.

Yes thats that I mean. I was just fiddling around placing each finger and then plucking each string around it and found that my 1st finger was muting the 2nd string.
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Offline close2u

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #78 on: December 07, 2015, 06:30:02 am »
Yes thats that I mean. I was just fiddling around placing each finger and then plucking each string around it and found that my 1st finger was muting the 2nd string.

BUT

When you play the D CHORD, the 2nd string rings out right?

Offline JaminCat

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #79 on: December 07, 2015, 08:52:39 am »
BUT

When you play the D CHORD, the 2nd string rings out right?

Yes it does.
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Offline Quinnicus

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #80 on: January 02, 2016, 09:17:23 pm »
Hi all

I got my first guitar (electric) in the Amazon sales the other day.  Ive never even picked one up before and decided on a new hobby.  Anyway, yesterday i went through the theory stuff in the 'getting started' section. 

Today i have tried and tried at having a go at the next part The D Cord and i am struggling.  Its my fingers - especially my 3rd finger on the second string.  Its always touching the 1st string and...well.. Muting it.

I am a large person with kinda fat fingers and i believe this is the reason.  So the questions are:
  • Is it possible for someone with fat fingers to even learn?
  • Is there any techniques to overcome this problem?
  • Are there 'accessories' that one can kind of put on there fingers to thin them - kinda like a thimble in sewing but different?

I know ive only had this guitar for 'hours' and have had a go at the d cord for about 1 of them, but its put me on a downer at the moment.  So any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Offline Rossco01

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #81 on: January 02, 2016, 09:29:18 pm »
I think it's definitely possible for you to play I'm sure others who have had similar challenges will reply soon.  Why not try - if you haven't already done so- trying A and E. E in particular should be a little easier.  Above all keep going it will take many hours and many days of practice to become competent but you can do it if you keep going.
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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #82 on: January 02, 2016, 10:54:48 pm »
Your fingers aren't too fat.  I know it is hard to believe that, but it is true. 

Try to make sure your fingers are nicely curle; and the tip, the last joint/section is coming down square to the fingerboard.

Also realize that there is more than one spot on your finger tip that can press on the string.  So if you third finger is muting the first string move the third finger tip a bit further towards the third string.  Still keeping it as square to the fingerboard as you can with nicely arched fingers.

Shadow
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Offline rsophiuchi

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #83 on: January 03, 2016, 02:00:53 am »
Hi Quinnicus,

I am a beginner and have only been playing for a few weeks. I also had particular trouble with the D chord, which I found frustrating as it seems not to be difficult for most people. I found the E chord easier so maybe try that one as Rossco01 suggested.

I kept paying particular attention to the D chord at the beginning of every practise session but then moved on to something else so I didn't get too disheartened. Finally my D chord is starting to sound OK when I play it using strum and pick, and I'm also get a much better sound when I play it in songs. Just stick with it, but also work on other areas when you can make more progress.

Susan


Offline jamiebell94

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #84 on: January 04, 2016, 06:02:55 pm »
Hi All

I've been playing guitar for a couple of years but recently decided to start from scratch and learn properly using the foundation courses. I'm finding the technique Justin suggested for the first few chords a little uncomfortable (i.e thumb behind the neck and palm not touching the guitar). I'm not sure if I'm doing it wrong or if I'm just not used to it. I've always brought my thumb up over the neck to mute certain strings whilst playing open chords up until this point. Should I continue using the same technique or use the one suggested in the videos? I'm not sure since from Justin's comments it appears I'll be using the former more as the course progresses.

Thanks!

Offline javianser

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #85 on: January 05, 2016, 07:48:28 pm »
Hi, everybody!

I've started practising guitar for around 10 days now and I just started with the 1-minute-change activities proposed by Justin. I'm quite happy because I'm around the 20 changes per minute. I started practising the A-D changes and I have found some problems with the D chord, specifically with the finger that presses the thinnest string (the middle finger). My fingers don't hurt anymore, but I feel pretty uncomfortable with the position of that finger, as if it was unnatural... I don't know how to explain it. Any tips to make it easier or is it just a matter of time?

Thanks a lot and sorry about my bad English. Oh, and Happy New Year! :D

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #86 on: January 05, 2016, 08:07:10 pm »
@jamieb

If you are getting all the strings to ring clearly I see no reason to 'revert' to the beginner's grip.  That tends to be the finger hand posture that allow a raw beginner the best chance of getting all the strings to ring true.

@Javan

From what I remember from my beginner days, almost everything I learned felt uncomfortable and unnatural.  So without more detail or a picture I am gonna go with that...

Shadow
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Offline steepens

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #87 on: January 05, 2016, 08:15:43 pm »
Javianser, using a finger in new and different ways is expected to feel different, it's par for the course. It will get much easier and feel more 'natural' the more you practice it. I found it interesting that Justin noted James Taylor's way of playing the D is different (the index/pointer and middle fingers are swapped), but doing this would prevent use of the index finger on the G string as an anchor for E to A to D chord switches. I would recommend sticking with the traditional fingering as shown. And nice job on the chord changes!

Offline justinguitar

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #88 on: January 07, 2016, 08:38:28 am »
@jamiebell94
The idea here is to build stregth in the hand so that power chords and barre chords are not as much shock - as well as helping people use fingertips correctly. So up to you, if you're getting the chords clean and you can already play barre chords you should be fine.

@javianser
everything is hard at the beginning - give it a few months to get new things feeling comfortable!

@Quinnicus
When I started teaching back in Tasmania I taught loads of farmers with massive fingers, and I was thinking they wouldn't be able to play - but they all did fine - it just takes practice! Stick at it and i'm sure you get there! :)


"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

Offline Fmaj7

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #89 on: February 11, 2016, 07:40:48 am »

 :) FFS: Fat Finger Syndrom[/b]  ;D

@Quinnicus
When I started teaching back in Tasmania I taught loads of farmers with massive fingers, and I was thinking they wouldn't be able to play - but they all did fine - it just takes practice! Stick at it and i'm sure you get there! :)

As I saw the fingers of Andres Segovia first - I can´t believe it, very fat fingers, but his excellent sound is great - he played on a high level classical guitar. Ok - there is a bit more space between the strings.

Or look at  the vids of Don Ross, Andy McKee on youtube - big Fingers and big music.

Imho a good shape of the Fretting-Hand is most important to manage the D chord accurate. Sometimes it helps to let the thumb comes down a bit towards the middle line of the neck, so you win a bit more space to set the fingers down in a good way.

Greets from Germany
Fmaj7


 

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