Author Topic: BC-111 • The D Chord  (Read 145905 times)

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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #50 on: July 22, 2015, 10:59:17 pm »
Yes.

But... there are reasons to learn the 3 finger version.  The D chord is perhaps the best chord to play around with suspensions.  With the standard grip you lift off the second finger letting the high e string ring, then put the second finger back down on the second fret, and then put your pinky down on the third fret.

These kinds of movements happen in tons of songs with the D chord.  If you can only play the D chord the way you describe, you will be limiting yourself.

It is rarely a good thing to do something just because it is easier.  If you can play the D in the standard grip, and choose an alternate grip great!  If you play the alternate grip because you can't play the standard grip I would have to say that is not good and you should expend the effort to learn the standard grip.

My two pennies.

Shadow
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Offline sylvia11361

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #51 on: August 19, 2015, 10:39:44 pm »
I play the chords and it keeps buzzing. :'( I press regulary and it doesnt work and if even if I press hard it keeps buzzing. My fingers hurt and im pressing hard but the sound doesnt come out. I just got this guitar 2 days ago and yesterday it sounded okay but now it buzzes too much.It couls be the formation but Im doing exactly what you're doing. I dont understand... I just started yesterday. When I play the a chord the i hear plucking sounds and buzzes. Im so confused. Is it just me? Im soo mad right now and I want to quit.... :-[

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #52 on: August 19, 2015, 11:38:05 pm »
Try playing each note in the D chord separately using your index finger. Does it buzz and on which
string. If it buzzes it's not you, your guitar needs to be set up. If it doesn't buzz then you are doing
something wrong when you are playing the D chord.

Does it buzz when you play other chords?

Offline 12-string_Doug

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #53 on: August 19, 2015, 11:49:52 pm »
Stitch beat me to it, and with a simpler method than what I was going to suggest. (Trying Dsus2, Dsus4, and D6 shapes. You'll get to those chords eventually, and will probably enjoy them, too.)

So all I've got to say is don't quit; it gets better over time.

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #54 on: August 20, 2015, 11:38:02 am »
Also make sure your fingers are as close to the frets as possible.

Shadow
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Offline hilts17

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #55 on: August 20, 2015, 11:57:40 am »
I agree with Doug. Don't quit! It gets better.

When I first started last year I could not play a clean D chord the first few times. I thought, "Great, I can't even play the first chord I'm supposed to learn. This is going to be too hard."

BUT, within a couple days it got a whole lot better. I could play the D chord clean. Then I struggled with getting a clean sounding G chord. It was more of a struggle than D. But again, it got easier the more I practised. Heck, I'm almost finished stage 6 of the BC and can play many songs. Try not to let the frustration beat you. Watch the lessons over and over again and practise every day. The hours and hours of practise is totally worth it.
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Offline Guitar_noob

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #56 on: August 20, 2015, 03:08:53 pm »
Play each string of the chord one at a time. You will easily notice which string buzzes. When you know which one is the problem, look at your hand. Is your finger close enough to the fret ? Is the string half muted by another finger ?

One other thing to consider : your finger tips will hurt during the first weeks. If it hurts too much, your hand will refuse on its own to press the string hard enough.

And of course, if none of the above is the reason. Consider checking your guitar settings.

Every new chord fingering takes time. Don't rush it. Don't panic. If it's not okay today, it will be better tomorrow, or the day after, or in a week. Your body / brain learns when resting.

New things get easier and easier to learn as you progress though so don't give up :). Hey, you only started 2 days ago ;).
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Offline SteveSR

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #57 on: August 21, 2015, 07:41:42 pm »
BACKGROUND: I am a 67+ y.o. with short fat fingers, so this is a struggle for me. I'm right-handed. I'v been practicing for about 3 weeks about 6 days a week on a beginner Fender electric guitar. I start each session with some of Justin's finger stretching exercise as a long-term investment.  I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me. I am close to getting D, A, and E  chords sounding pretty good using strum-pick-strum, so, soon, I will be moving on to Justin's transition exercises. I'm determined to learn "the right way."

Q: I am concerned that I am not positioning my right arm properly on the electric guitar and not positioning my right hand properly. Justin's early lessons demonstrate positioning the right arm on an acoustic guitar, which, of course, is substantially thicker than the electric. I am concerned I am learning some bad habits positioning my right arm and hand, including how far up or down the guitar to strike the guitar strings. Does Justin have a video that focuses on these right arm/hand topics for an electric guitar? Another video on YouTube that shows proper right arm/hand technique?

Thanks much, Steve

Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #58 on: August 21, 2015, 10:35:16 pm »
Steve,

I assume your guitar has 3 pick ups.  You want to be striking the strings somewhere around the middle pickup.   The exact location is kinda up in the air.  Really, any where between the neck and the bridge pick ups works. 

As far as arm position goes here is a place to start.  Stand up with you arms relaxed and by your sides.  Bend your arm at the elbow at about 90 degrees fingers out as if you were about to shake hands, but keep your at your side.  Now rotate your arm so your palm touches your belly.  Some thing sorta in that area.  For me that ends up putting my hand a bit high and a bit too much toward the center line of my body (looks to be about where BB King's hand ended up.)

Anyhow now sit down with the guitar sitting on the right leg and repeat (a stool works better than a chair for this).  Stay very relaxed.  Arm to 90, rotate so palm is over the middle pick up.  Your elbow will probably move away from your body and forward a bit.  That is okay.

Don't scrunch you shoulders up like you are shrugging.  A lot of beginners do this without even realizing it.  Keep your shoulders loose.  Sit up straight avoid craning your neck too much.  Relax and breath.  A lot of beginners I have taught seem to hold their breath.

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Offline SteveSR

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #59 on: August 22, 2015, 03:15:42 am »
Shodo,

Thx for responding and for the info. You are correct: My Fender beginner electric ("Starcaster") has 3 pickups. (I bought the "Starcaster" from Amazon about 3 yrs ago and it collected dust until I recently retired.) Following Justin's theme of maintaining the guitar in roughly the same position, when I practice, I am usually sitting in a chair but wearing the strap so that, if I stand up, the guitar will be close to the same position as sitting.

Re right arm and right hand, when I am preparing to practice tomorrow, I'll re-review your post and attempt to execute.

Thx again!
Steve

PS Justin's Beginner songbook arrived in today's mail. Looking fwd to exploring it some after doing some of the D-A-E chord-transition exercises for a week or two. As I take advantage of Justin's excellent teaching, I'll be buying more of his products!


Offline SiegeFrog

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #60 on: August 22, 2015, 08:47:12 pm »
I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me. I am close to getting D, A, and E  chords sounding pretty good using strum-pick-strum, so, soon, I will be moving on to Justin's transition exercises. I'm determined to learn "the right way."

I'm not sure I'm understanding your post correctly, but Justin has designed the BC to progress stage to stage. When you're in Stage 1, you should watch all the Stage 1 videos (including the last one that details the practice routine) and practice all the skills taught. He has a very detailed practice routine for each stage and milestones to reach before advancing to the next stage. You should be practicing chord changes as well as the strum-pick-strum. Also, you should be trying to play in rhythm. If your fingers haven't toughened up enough yet to do the full 20 minute routine at once, consider splitting it up and do half in the morning and half in the evening. I'm just imagining someone only doing strum-pick-strum and thinking your missing about 2/3 of your practice.
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Offline 12-string_Doug

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #61 on: August 22, 2015, 09:48:25 pm »
I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me.
  This might or might not help: I'm just wondering what the Strat has for strings (gauge). If it has .011 or heavier, maybe a set of .010 would bring less finger misery than the present ones. (As far as the effort needed for pressing down to form the chords, more so than the eventual toughening of fingertips.)
  Also, was it set up properly when you first got it? Maybe a good setup could also help reduce the effort needed to form the chords.

Offline hilts17

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #62 on: August 22, 2015, 10:07:26 pm »
I agree with Doug about getting the guitar set up properly. It was the best money I ever spent, taking mine to a good luthier. It was like night and day. He made the guitar so much easier to play because I didn't have to press the strings nearly as hard. Even made it possible for me to play the F barre chord!
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Offline SteveSR

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #63 on: August 23, 2015, 02:04:08 am »
SiegeFrog, 12-string_Doug, and hilts17,

Thx for the additional responses. I appreciate the general advice, given in response to my "BACKGROUND" intro. I think that Shado addressed my question re right arm and right hand placement and where to strike the string with the pick, and at today's practice I followed his instructions. Thx again Shodo!

Perhaps I missed it, but I still don't think Justin adequately covers right arm & hand placement on an electric in his early lessons. In lesson BC-106 [starting @ 1:57], Justin discusses right arm placement on an acoustic, but he doesn't discuss an electric at all. When he finally demos an electric (starting at 3:56), it is in terms of placement of a strap, not placement of the right arm and right hand and where to strike the string with the pick. He then (starting at 6:01) discusses left hand placement, nothing about the right arm/hand.

In lessons BC-111, 112, & 113, Justin covers the D, A, and E chords, but, to the degree that the right hand is ever shown, it is using an acoustic.

Don't get me wrong: The lessons, over-all, have been excellent so far, but I suggest that there is a hole in his coverage, ie, on an electric, right arm and right hand placement and where to strike the string(s) with the pick.

SiegeFrog's advice to split up the session into 2 parts is well taken. In fact, even giving myself a 5 minute break allows me to practice significantly longer.

Be assured that I have been methodically progressing through the lessons and occasionally preview a few ahead of where I am actually practicing. Also, for fun, I occasionally roam around Justin's web site, which is how I found the finger-stretching lesson, which I see as absolutely essential to my long-term progress, especially given my aging, short, fat fingers.

12-string_Doug & hilts17, Not sure of the gauge of the strings on my Fender. They were the ones that came with it. I'm finally starting to adapt to them, so I am hesitant to mess with whatever gauge they are and the current set up. But if I get frustrated again, I'll consider taking it to a "guitar-smith." Thx for bringing this option to my attention.

Best regards, Steve

Offline Dr Winterbourne

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #64 on: August 23, 2015, 01:54:54 pm »
Wíth regards to right hand on electric, once you are holding the pick correctly and comfortably, I would let my ears guide me. It is early days for you, I understand, but you will find that where you hit the string with your pick will alter the sound. And I would say hit the string at the place where it makes the sound you want for the song or lick or bit you are playing.

For example, if you pick right in front of the bridge, the tone is very brittle, very tense and trebly. Perfect for Dick Dale surf rock. The further forward you go, the less these thin trebly qualities will dominate. As an experiment, try strumming above the 12th fret - very warm, very smooth. It is not for everyday, but sometimes I'll strum there, for effect (and I usually pick there when I tune my strings.) As you develop you will discover things like harmonics at certain places on the strings, and you may want to strike or avoid these harmonic points.

In short, let your ears guide you.
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Offline iChow

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #65 on: October 02, 2015, 04:54:54 am »
Although I'm on stage 2 right now I was wondering if the way I position my hands to play D chord currently is okay (ie. it is not going to cause me problems later on). If I need to correct it might as well do it now. Here are some pictures: , .

Online close2u

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #66 on: October 02, 2015, 06:37:25 am »
Your middle finger 1st knuckle is almost bending backwards, this is not helping your whole hand arch around and for your tips to be pressing from an optimum angle on the strings.
Your 3rd finger is coming from the side instead of above because of this.
Your index finger is also a little too straight at the 1st knuckle.
Look very carefully at the video 'still frame' and the pic on this page to see how the 1st finger knuckles need to bend to allow your fingers and hand to 'arch'.
Your hands and fingers seem long and large - but you must bend not keep them straight.
Hope that helps.
Good luck.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 09:53:48 am by close2u »

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #67 on: October 02, 2015, 04:35:38 pm »
I know Justin want you to put your thumb in the middle of the neck at the beginning to help
strengthen your hand but in your case with your long fingers I'd suggest moving your thumb
up form the center. And angle your guitar up a little more so you can bring your hand down more
(like in the link Close posted)
Look at how straight Justin's wrist is compared to yours. By moving your thumb up and rotating
your hand you will save yourself a lot of wrist pain in the future.

Offline suzidownunder

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #68 on: October 03, 2015, 11:44:01 am »
When I play D, my third finger is last down  trailing about a beat. It doesn't seem to be a problem - just wondering if others experience the same?
I reached the intermediate stage and play many songs but still wander back through the beginner stages to brush up.

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Offline iChow

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #69 on: October 04, 2015, 07:28:17 am »
Your middle finger 1st knuckle is almost bending backwards, this is not helping your whole hand arch around and for your tips to be pressing from an optimum angle on the strings.
Your 3rd finger is coming from the side instead of above because of this.
Your index finger is also a little too straight at the 1st knuckle.
Look very carefully at the video 'still frame' and the pic on this page to see how the 1st finger knuckles need to bend to allow your fingers and hand to 'arch'.
Your hands and fingers seem long and large - but you must bend not keep them straight.
Hope that helps.
Good luck.
Thanks you and stitch101 for your replies.  I was wondering if this is better?
« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 09:53:29 am by close2u »

Offline stitch101

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #70 on: October 05, 2015, 03:50:28 am »
I'd say yes . Your wrist is straight and your fingers aren't bent backwards. Both solving future pain issues.

Offline justinguitar

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #71 on: November 04, 2015, 12:05:21 pm »
@SteveSR - agree that I need to put some additional material in for electric guitar. Have added in some FAQ, but will do something in video next update!

@suzidownunder - the "air changes" exercise should help, do try and get them to come down all together, especially if you've reached intermediate level!
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Offline JaminCat

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #72 on: December 02, 2015, 07:29:38 pm »
Hi,

I've been playing for just over two weeks now.

I've noticed that when playing the D chord my 1st finger is muting the B string. Even though this is the case the chord rings out nicely because my 3rd finger is pressing the B string at the 3rd fret.

I know that the D6 chord is essentially the same as the D major but with the B string open. So my question is should I work on the placement of my 1st finger now? or not worry about it until I get to the D6 chord?

Thanks
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Offline shadowscott007

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #73 on: December 02, 2015, 07:43:07 pm »
Not sure you need to bother, for now.  But I would choose the D7 chord to get working rather than the D6...

It gets played a lot more commonly than the D6 shape in that shape.

It will be just a little bit easier to get working because the B string will be just a tad closer to the fret board as it passes your index finger.

Shadow
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Online close2u

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Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #74 on: December 03, 2015, 08:49:58 pm »
[quote author=JaminCat link=topic=16420.msg332989#msg332989 date=1449084578

I've noticed that when playing the D chord my 1st finger is muting the B string. Even though this is the case the chord rings out nicely because my 3rd finger is pressing the B string at the 3rd fret.

[/quote]

That does not make sense.
How can your 1st finger on fret 2 mute the note your 3rd finger is playing on fret 3?
You can not mute a fretted note from a position behind where it is fretted.

 

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