Author Topic: BC-111 • The D Chord  (Read 123599 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Motion2082

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 1
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2015, 04:29:21 am »
Hi guys,

I have a question regarding the Chords D and A.

On your website Chord D only plays the first 4 strings.

I have purchased a Progressive Guitar Method by Gary Turner and Brenton White and they claim that the D chord is play with the 5th string A played open as well. I'm confused because a lot of their chords are different than yours.

Another one I noticed is the A Chord. You claim only 5 strings are played but this Guitar Method says 6.

I have attached the example of what I mean below.




Could you please help educate me as to which is the right one.

Cheers,
Paul
« Last Edit: April 11, 2015, 07:09:23 am by Motion2082 »

Online close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 11775
  • Good Vibes 458
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #46 on: April 11, 2015, 10:30:04 am »
@ Motion2082

A D chord played with an open A string is still a D chord.
But ... it is what is called an inversion.
D is made up of three notes: D, A, F#.
When you play a 4-string D chord you play, D, A, D, F#.
The bass note is the root note.
Add in the 5th open A string and you play: A, D, A, D, F#.
This is called an inversion.
It is still a D chord as it has only those 3 notes.
But the bass note is not the root.

Similarly with a 6-string A chord you have: E, A, E, A, C#, E (the 3 notes of an A chord and nothing else).

BUT
In the majority of situations and songs and real-life uses, you play the 4-string and 5-string versions.

That book is failing to do its job by not explaining this.

I recommend you stick to Justin's course and beginners method.

:)

Offline stitch101

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 4984
  • Good Vibes 175
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #47 on: April 11, 2015, 09:39:18 pm »
They are naming the chords. If you play any note from the chord before the rot it is slash chord .
The D would be D/A  the the A would be A/E check out Justin's lesson on slash chords.

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3482
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2015, 11:04:46 pm »
The B and Bb chords bother me, too.  Looks like they are NOT showing the 5th string root note... odd. 

I could forgive them showing all the notes that "work"; low A for the D chord, low E for the A chord, low E for the C chord and all... but not showing the 5th string root for the A-shape B chords... really?

It does say "beginner", but still... I would rather see "more" notes rather than have some missing.

Maybe when you buy book 2 you get more dots?

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline Mehrdad

  • School Prom Hero
  • **
  • Posts: 73
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #49 on: July 22, 2015, 08:04:50 pm »
Hi. Can you play d chord (or any other chord) the way you want like? I play d chord with my first finger barred across the second fret of the first three strings and my second finger on the third fret of the second string can I play like that? Til now I didn't have any problems with this shape but does it really matter to play with three fingers? It's really easier this way and more efficient. you can save one finger!

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3482
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #50 on: July 22, 2015, 10:59:17 pm »
Yes.

But... there are reasons to learn the 3 finger version.  The D chord is perhaps the best chord to play around with suspensions.  With the standard grip you lift off the second finger letting the high e string ring, then put the second finger back down on the second fret, and then put your pinky down on the third fret.

These kinds of movements happen in tons of songs with the D chord.  If you can only play the D chord the way you describe, you will be limiting yourself.

It is rarely a good thing to do something just because it is easier.  If you can play the D in the standard grip, and choose an alternate grip great!  If you play the alternate grip because you can't play the standard grip I would have to say that is not good and you should expend the effort to learn the standard grip.

My two pennies.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline sylvia11361

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 1
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #51 on: August 19, 2015, 10:39:44 pm »
I play the chords and it keeps buzzing. :'( I press regulary and it doesnt work and if even if I press hard it keeps buzzing. My fingers hurt and im pressing hard but the sound doesnt come out. I just got this guitar 2 days ago and yesterday it sounded okay but now it buzzes too much.It couls be the formation but Im doing exactly what you're doing. I dont understand... I just started yesterday. When I play the a chord the i hear plucking sounds and buzzes. Im so confused. Is it just me? Im soo mad right now and I want to quit.... :-[

Offline stitch101

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 4984
  • Good Vibes 175
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #52 on: August 19, 2015, 11:38:05 pm »
Try playing each note in the D chord separately using your index finger. Does it buzz and on which
string. If it buzzes it's not you, your guitar needs to be set up. If it doesn't buzz then you are doing
something wrong when you are playing the D chord.

Does it buzz when you play other chords?

Offline 12-string_Doug

  • Concert Hall Hasbeen
  • ****
  • Posts: 390
  • Good Vibes 16
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #53 on: August 19, 2015, 11:49:52 pm »
Stitch beat me to it, and with a simpler method than what I was going to suggest. (Trying Dsus2, Dsus4, and D6 shapes. You'll get to those chords eventually, and will probably enjoy them, too.)

So all I've got to say is don't quit; it gets better over time.

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3482
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #54 on: August 20, 2015, 11:38:02 am »
Also make sure your fingers are as close to the frets as possible.

Shadow
The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline hilts17

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 1093
  • Good Vibes 61
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #55 on: August 20, 2015, 11:57:40 am »
I agree with Doug. Don't quit! It gets better.

When I first started last year I could not play a clean D chord the first few times. I thought, "Great, I can't even play the first chord I'm supposed to learn. This is going to be too hard."

BUT, within a couple days it got a whole lot better. I could play the D chord clean. Then I struggled with getting a clean sounding G chord. It was more of a struggle than D. But again, it got easier the more I practised. Heck, I'm almost finished stage 6 of the BC and can play many songs. Try not to let the frustration beat you. Watch the lessons over and over again and practise every day. The hours and hours of practise is totally worth it.
Martin D28
Seagull S6 Original
Seagull Entourage CW Black QI
Seagull Coastline 12 String
Yamaha Pacifica 112

Offline Guitar_noob

  • Arena Rocker
  • *****
  • Posts: 502
  • Good Vibes 18
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #56 on: August 20, 2015, 03:08:53 pm »
Play each string of the chord one at a time. You will easily notice which string buzzes. When you know which one is the problem, look at your hand. Is your finger close enough to the fret ? Is the string half muted by another finger ?

One other thing to consider : your finger tips will hurt during the first weeks. If it hurts too much, your hand will refuse on its own to press the string hard enough.

And of course, if none of the above is the reason. Consider checking your guitar settings.

Every new chord fingering takes time. Don't rush it. Don't panic. If it's not okay today, it will be better tomorrow, or the day after, or in a week. Your body / brain learns when resting.

New things get easier and easier to learn as you progress though so don't give up :). Hey, you only started 2 days ago ;).
限界などない!停滞しているだけだ!

Offline SteveSR

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #57 on: August 21, 2015, 07:41:42 pm »
BACKGROUND: I am a 67+ y.o. with short fat fingers, so this is a struggle for me. I'm right-handed. I'v been practicing for about 3 weeks about 6 days a week on a beginner Fender electric guitar. I start each session with some of Justin's finger stretching exercise as a long-term investment.  I am finally able to practice a little over 10 minutes a day w/o my fingers killing me. I am close to getting D, A, and E  chords sounding pretty good using strum-pick-strum, so, soon, I will be moving on to Justin's transition exercises. I'm determined to learn "the right way."

Q: I am concerned that I am not positioning my right arm properly on the electric guitar and not positioning my right hand properly. Justin's early lessons demonstrate positioning the right arm on an acoustic guitar, which, of course, is substantially thicker than the electric. I am concerned I am learning some bad habits positioning my right arm and hand, including how far up or down the guitar to strike the guitar strings. Does Justin have a video that focuses on these right arm/hand topics for an electric guitar? Another video on YouTube that shows proper right arm/hand technique?

Thanks much, Steve

Offline shadowscott007

  • Stadium Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 3482
  • Good Vibes 119
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #58 on: August 21, 2015, 10:35:16 pm »
Steve,

I assume your guitar has 3 pick ups.  You want to be striking the strings somewhere around the middle pickup.   The exact location is kinda up in the air.  Really, any where between the neck and the bridge pick ups works. 

As far as arm position goes here is a place to start.  Stand up with you arms relaxed and by your sides.  Bend your arm at the elbow at about 90 degrees fingers out as if you were about to shake hands, but keep your at your side.  Now rotate your arm so your palm touches your belly.  Some thing sorta in that area.  For me that ends up putting my hand a bit high and a bit too much toward the center line of my body (looks to be about where BB King's hand ended up.)

Anyhow now sit down with the guitar sitting on the right leg and repeat (a stool works better than a chair for this).  Stay very relaxed.  Arm to 90, rotate so palm is over the middle pick up.  Your elbow will probably move away from your body and forward a bit.  That is okay.

Don't scrunch you shoulders up like you are shrugging.  A lot of beginners do this without even realizing it.  Keep your shoulders loose.  Sit up straight avoid craning your neck too much.  Relax and breath.  A lot of beginners I have taught seem to hold their breath.

Shado




The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Offline SteveSR

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 3
  • Good Vibes 0
Re: BC-111 • The D Chord
« Reply #59 on: August 22, 2015, 03:15:42 am »
Shodo,

Thx for responding and for the info. You are correct: My Fender beginner electric ("Starcaster") has 3 pickups. (I bought the "Starcaster" from Amazon about 3 yrs ago and it collected dust until I recently retired.) Following Justin's theme of maintaining the guitar in roughly the same position, when I practice, I am usually sitting in a chair but wearing the strap so that, if I stand up, the guitar will be close to the same position as sitting.

Re right arm and right hand, when I am preparing to practice tomorrow, I'll re-review your post and attempt to execute.

Thx again!
Steve

PS Justin's Beginner songbook arrived in today's mail. Looking fwd to exploring it some after doing some of the D-A-E chord-transition exercises for a week or two. As I take advantage of Justin's excellent teaching, I'll be buying more of his products!


 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App