Author Topic: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered  (Read 158691 times)

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Offline joueur de guitare

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #255 on: August 13, 2016, 08:27:32 am »
Your 1 minute changes don't have to be perfect, just not terrible. Perfect will come, but it'll take time.

Justin writes:

Quote
One Minute Changes
The object of this exercise is to get your fingers moving quickly. Although you should be trying to get the fingers in the perfect positions that you have been working on in your chord practice, if they are a little sloppy it is OK, we are working up the speed here!

Here http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-119-PRACTICEstage1.php


You don't NEED a certain level of proficiency to start playing songs. Start now. It's a great way to develop your chord changes and strumming. Start slow, and build up. You'll sound crap at first, but no-one else can tell you that they didn't either  ;)

Use a metronome. Start with something simple.

It doesn't get much simpler than Feelin' Alright.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BS-102-FeelinAlright-JoeCocker.php

Three Little Birds is a bit more interesting.

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BS-101-ThreeLittleBirds-BobMarley.php


...and what Joerfe said.





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Offline scorpio58

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #256 on: August 13, 2016, 01:14:51 pm »
Something I found helpful when starting one minute chord changes was doing 2 strums per chord at first.

ie - E chord 2 strums - A chord 2 strums for 1 minute.

Doing this for a few days really helped when I moved onto single strum chord changes and it has continued to be handy going through the Stage 2 chords.

I found it allows me to make any minor little shifts to resolve muted strings without rushing the change.

Then, when I move to single strum changes it seems my finger muscle memory is more settled and the chords ring clean with a greater consistency.

Just thought I'd share, maybe it will help someone.

Offline mvpetri

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #257 on: October 24, 2016, 02:16:25 pm »
One weird thing that made me get better at the 1 minute changes: Sleep.

The first day I tried the 1 minute changes I was the worst at it. I had time to spare, so I practiced for a long time, more than the suggested 5 minutes.

I ended the day frustrated, because it was so hard and because my fingers were sore like hell.

Then I went to sleep, thinking I had made a mistake buying this guitar.

The next day I woke up. It was saturday, I wasn't going to work that day. Ate my breakfast and after that I gave the guitar another change. For my surprise, I kind of get 100% better. The day before I did what? Less than 10 changes in one minute. But the next day I was able to do 18-20.

It is very interesting how the brain works your memory while you sleep.

Offline deadeye_ag

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #258 on: October 25, 2016, 01:54:37 pm »
Yes mvpetri, sleep helps and I would say rest in general (meaning not playing the guitar 24/7) allows time for your brain to process what you've learned. There is a reason why Justin only has you practicing individual skills (chord changes, strumming, scales, etc.) for 5-8 minutes tops. Our brains tend to see the biggest gains when we practice in intense short spurts with rest in between. Will you get better if you practice longer? Probably but the rate at which you will improve will likely be far lower. In other words, short, focused practice will yield the biggest "bang for your buck" in respect to time spent.

In my experience, I'll be stuck on something, I'll not practice that skill for a few days and come back to it and it just clicks. The brain is an amazing thing

Offline wickedrum

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #259 on: April 12, 2017, 04:38:06 am »
Hi all,

Firstly, thanks a ton Justin! This site is amazing and super useful for beginners like me.

My question is - so I have an electric guitar that I have started learning with and I have zero experience with guitars before. I am in Stage 2 of the beginner's course - so been using the electric as an acoustic, ie, without an amp or connecting it to anything. Can someone tell me when I can actually start using it as an actual electric guitar? By connecting the amp, using a pedal etc? Is there some specific course/stage for that?

Thank you!

Offline Drubbing

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #260 on: April 12, 2017, 05:01:51 am »
You can use your guitar with an amp anytime you want. The course is the same for either guitar. You will need to buy an amp if you haven't already. You don't need pedals, those are for effects.

Offline bigbl5

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #261 on: April 12, 2017, 01:16:23 pm »
Exactly as Drubbing said, use an amp at any time.  If you have to buy an amp, don't waste your money on a super cheap $50 amp - they sound terrible.  You can get a decent modeling amp for under $200 if you want to mess with some effects later.  However, for now, just use the basic clean settings.
I will eventually play as well as David Gilmour - even if it takes me another 40 years.

Offline joueur de guitare

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #262 on: April 12, 2017, 01:35:41 pm »
Hi all,

Firstly, thanks a ton Justin! This site is amazing and super useful for beginners like me.

My question is - so I have an electric guitar that I have started learning with and I have zero experience with guitars before. I am in Stage 2 of the beginner's course - so been using the electric as an acoustic, ie, without an amp or connecting it to anything. Can someone tell me when I can actually start using it as an actual electric guitar? By connecting the amp, using a pedal etc? Is there some specific course/stage for that?

Thank you!

Start now!

I've always found that unamped electrics flatter my playing. Maybe it's just me, but when you plug in and turn it up a little it magnifies any sloppiness.
Guitars. Fender Highway 1 Tele: Fender Shortboard LE Mustang: Ibanez AS73 semi-hollow: Ibanez SR370 bass: Squier Affinity Strat: Squier Jagmaster.

Offline wickedrum

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #263 on: April 12, 2017, 01:46:43 pm »
Perfect, yeah makes sense, it does seem to help! And the starter kit did come with an amp, so I will use that for now.
One question though, the guitar has 2 knobs - volume and tone. What exactly does tone mean? When I was playing around, I see it kinda makes the guitar come 'alive' but what exactly is it?
Thanks again!

Offline DarrellW

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #264 on: April 12, 2017, 03:05:52 pm »
The tone knob changes the balance of the sound going to the amplifier between treble and bass, it is usual to turn both volume and tone knobs fully up when you're learning and change the sound on the Amp; so put the tone knob so it sounds bright through the amp.
My singing sucks so I’m learning Guitar and Ukulele, it’s fun 🌟

Offline Paulvm

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #265 on: May 18, 2017, 07:19:40 am »
Hi there,

I am new to this forum and relatively new to playing guitar. I have tried the justin beginner guitar course a year ago but stopped after a while. I now decided that I really want to learn to play guitar and become somewhat proficient. I am at stage two now and my chord changes are all almost at 60. Ido have some questions
1. I find myself strumming more string than I should with my D chord, A chord etc. Justin says it will come in time that you only strum the correct number of string. However, I read some posts here that you should correct this as soon as possible. 
2. I use a 0,38mm pick because it feels right to me. Should I start experimenting with thicker picks, and what is the 'normal' thickness of a pick?
3. I now own a old Maya fk 344r steel string guitar and a phoenix stc 100 electric guitar. Should I go for better quality guitars or are these fine as well?
4. I know this one has been asked a lot. When did you move to another stage? I now am at stage 2, trying to get my chord changes a bit faster. I can play with a few songs from stage 1, but still struggle a bit with my made up chord sequences with Am, Dm and Em. Should I work some more on that or should I include G and C as well? Because I do know how to play the G and C from earlier.
5. I mostly have an hour or more to play every day. What best to work on after you have done the practice schedule from the justin course? Does the effect of trying to get your chord changes faster wear out after those 5 minutes of practice? There is so much to learn but I am struggling what is more important right now for me.
How, a bit more typing than I hade in mind. Hopefully it is a bit understandable.
Cheers,
Paul

Offline Rossco01

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #266 on: May 18, 2017, 08:29:49 am »
Hi Paulvm and welcome to the forum.

1. It'll come with practice but focus on trying to hit the 4 strings only for the D. Just focus on the practice routines (pick/strum and 1 minute changes). By the time you get to the end of the course you'll have forgotten this was an issue.
2. Personally I'd stay with a light pick at this point. It's more forgiving (a heavier pick can tend to catch in the strings more). However if you feel you want to step up do so.
3. If you're comfortable playing the guitar you've got and it generally stays in tune stick with it for now. Set yourself a goal to treat yourself when you get to the end of BC! If however it's not comfortable then search around for something else. There are plenty of suggestions on the forum for good beginners guitars (generally Yamaha). I'm still playing my original guitars.
4. If you know all of the material for a stage and are making the progress against the practice goals that Justin has set then feel free to step on to the next stage. Not for all but a general rule of thumb is that people tend to lag by a couple of stages in terms of playing songs from the BSB. Make sure though that you do know all the material and are comfortable with the goals. I have to admit I didn't do (and still haven't) done any of the ear training etc. I'm not saying that because it's a good thing just to say that I don't believe you shouldn't progress if this is the only thing that you're not quite there with.
5.If you've got more time than needed then songs is the obvious place to practice. It's what you're learning guitar for AND my experience tells me that some of the things are easier to learn and embed through songs. On good days I spend about 1-2 hours on guitar and even on bad days I'll spend 20 minutes strumming a couple of songs. Close will tell you learn SONGS SONGS SONGS. There is also no harm in reading ahead a little on the course even if you're not ready to progress to the next stage.

Have fun and stick with it. In no time you'll be playing quite fluently.
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Offline DavidP

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #267 on: May 18, 2017, 04:20:14 pm »
Paulvm,

Agree fully with Rossco.

There aren't hard and fast rules, just guidelines and principles.

You need to stay engaged and interested, striking a balance between challenging yourself to learn new things and practising to lay a solid foundation.

For example, if you spend weeks and weeks on the D chord you could become bored.  But rushing through stage 1 too quickly could dilute your efforts to get solid on A, D & E. 

What worked for me, was doing the strum-pick-strum and one minute changes every time I practised in the initial stages.  And immediately starting to work on songs.  As an absolute beginner I'd follow Justin's advice that "Three Little Birds" is the first song in Beginner Song Book vol 1 for good reason" and start with that as soon as you can play ADE chords.  Work with the video lesson on the song.  I found as I got better at making the changes I could up the tempo.  On that note ... get a metronome.  Start with the 4 down strums at whatever tempo allows you to change from A to D etc.  And then speed it up slowly.  Eventually I could play along with Justin as he taught the chord progressions to play the song.  And some time after that I could play along with Justin when he plays the song at the start of the lesson.

I think that approach would work well throughout the Beginner Course, it has for me. I know he (and others) encourage playing along with original recordings. I've found it difficult to hear the changes and the beat to do that, even when I know I have the ability to play and make the changes at the right tempo.  But playing along with Justin makes following along easier, since it is just the guitar.

I also found it quite effective to go quite quickly through to stage 3 and then consolidate on those 8 chords.  Kept it interesting and expanded the possibilities for songs to play. For me stage 4 was quite challenging so I focussed on that while continuing to work on the stage 1-3 songs for a couple of months.  Only once I was starting to work on stage 4 songs did I think about stage 5.

Just do what works for you to stay engaged and build a strong foundation.

Cheers
David 

Offline Paulvm

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #268 on: May 18, 2017, 10:58:16 pm »
Thanks!

I put the G and C chord in my practice routine today. 25 changes on the first real try:).(Or 12,5 if you count it different). I think I will stay at stage 3 for a while, work on some songs and get better with my timing. I am a lefty learning to play guitar right handed so I think rhythm with my right hand will be a challenge. My goal for now is learn to play a few good songs to play at a gathering or at the campfire. Will see how far I will get.

Offline DavidP

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Re: BC-101 • Common beginners questions answered
« Reply #269 on: May 19, 2017, 07:22:41 am »
Always a pleasure, Paul

Enjoy the practice and working up the songs. 

A good way to help measure progress and get feedback to help get even better is to post recordings in the Performance section once you are able to play through a song.

I did that, scary as it was to take the plunge, and it has been invaluable in terms of giving myself milestones to work to and achieve, plus feedback and loads of encouragement. 

Something to consider when you are reach that point.  For now, maybe just read and listen, from which you will probably pick up useful tips and maybe even more inspiration to work at your playing.

Love the journey!! Celebrate the moments!!

Cheers
David

 

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