Author Topic: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction  (Read 46237 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

geoff willo

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2009, 10:09:46 am »
could someone please explain to my dumb ass where the new post button is.I wish to post a new topic for blues basics.I read the help section.I must be thick!

Yozza

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2009, 12:34:52 am »
Hello!

Oh, and what the h*** is progression I-IV-V?? It makes me confuse, beacuse I don't know what it means. Help please.

-Tomps

The I-IV-V is the chord progression used in Blues. The 1st, 4th & 5th note of the scale.

As you know they are 8 notes in scale A B C D E F G A.

The I-IV-V would then be A D E - 12 bar Blues in the key of A.

If you start the scale from D - D E F G A B C D
The I-IV-V would then be D G A - 12 bar Blues in the key of D.

Hope that made sense.


Close, but I don't think you're totally right.

I believe the scale that is used when determining things like I IV V progressions is actually the major scale and not the chromatic scale which is what you seem to have used.

The formula for the major scale is WWHWWWH where W= a whole step or a full tone (two frets) and H = a half step or a semitone (one fret)

So the A major scale would be A B C# D E F# G# A - Funnily enough the progression works out the same in this instance (A,D&E) but you'd obviously run into problems if you were asked to play a different progression.

R0e

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #27 on: March 26, 2009, 10:39:27 pm »
Hi there. I'm fairly new to the blues.

I was wondering if there was a particular artist that you should start out with when just beginning the blues and why? I like to go for challenging stuff since I've played guitar for awhile and so I find B.B King's licks really easy to play.

Is it definitely recommended to start learning with the three Kings of blues because they might lay a particular foundation that I don't understand yet? I know my pentatonic scales in all 5 positions. But do they give something that will make learning blues that is more difficult easier to pick up or something else?

richyroo

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2009, 01:02:31 pm »
how long should it take (on average) to go from complete beginner to being able to play along to this lesson at normal speed?

Human-Thor

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2009, 10:13:31 pm »
Questions...
Hello Gang:
When you all stop laughing at this question. I would really appreciate any help.
When I practice my bends, lol, my fingers get snagged under the stings above. Example if I bend the 3rd string on the 7th fret my finger tips get snagged under the 4th and even the 5th strings,lol. Now isn't that a pisser. Any tips on how I can prevent this? I cut my finger nails real short could maybe growing them back a little help or am I just a xx--xx?

Quark

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #30 on: June 02, 2009, 10:30:46 pm »
Quote
When I practice my bends, lol, my fingers get snagged under the stings above. Example if I bend the 3rd string on the 7th fret my finger tips get snagged under the 4th and even the 5th strings,

It could be several things. First, you might be placing your fingers at too steep an angle which creates more of a "digging" motion then bending motion. You should be using your tips to bend the string. If done correctly it will not allow you to dig under the other strings but will "push" them. Which is good as it mutes out stings above.
Second, your action may be too high. Is this on an acoustic or electic? I had that problem on an acoustic once where the action was set so high I could drive a truck under it.
Third, take another look at Justins video on bending. Note how he uses the pivot motion. As far as the nails go, I don't think it makes any difference but maybe someone else here can address that.
Hope this helps.

W

Human-Thor

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2009, 04:42:41 am »
Quark: Thank you very much. I just tried your suggestion and it appears that I am holding my finger a little to flat. That's going to take some getting use to. I watch Justin's video and it appeared that he was holding his fingers flatter. could just be the angle of the camera. However, at any rate your suggestion helped. Again I thank you kind sir. Oh yes and thanks for not laughing  ;)

Quark

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #32 on: June 03, 2009, 05:41:34 am »
I am glad it worked out for you HT.  :)
Getting string bending down is a must for blues guitar playing. The tricky part for me is getting a nice vibrato once I have the string bent to the right note. Some days I get it just right, other days it sounds like nails on a chalkboard!  :D

W

Wannabe#1

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2009, 08:58:00 am »
Hey i just wanted to ask if that twang at the end of the a minor pentatonic scale necessary or is it bcoz it sounds cool..
im asking coz i cant manage that twang... im completely new to blues...

Thanks a million.....

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 16060
  • Good Vibes 680
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2009, 09:13:44 am »
'twang?'

Wannabe#1

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2009, 09:30:29 am »
Hey srry closetou by twang i meant the thing that he does when he ends the scale so it sort of hums fr sometime before dying out..u knowhe holds down the string and moves it..i dont know if u r getting this..

also do u alternate pick in these scales or all down picks??

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 16060
  • Good Vibes 680
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2009, 10:02:35 am »
I think I understand

at the end of showing a scale or lick Justin often slides his finger down the neck away from the position he was in

this is not part of learning the scale so is not necessary in that sense

it does sound cool ... sepecially with a bit of reverb / echo etc

it does finish a solo off in a cool way

it can be really useful in a solo when you want to pause for a moment - giving your playing some space

it can be a great way to link different positions of the scale when soloing

if it sounds good it is good

 :)

CPSTRAT

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2010, 02:45:20 pm »
I hope this is the right spot to ask this question. I am working on the "Really useful Blues Solos"; i.e. Albert King and Clapton presently. I am really impressed by how you (Justin) nail the tone of each individual. Can you post which guitar is used for each song and a basic starting point for pedals? I.e. how do you get the distinctive Clapton tone vs the Albert King sound? Thanks

Craig

Davidox

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #38 on: July 11, 2010, 11:56:30 am »
Hi everyone.

I'm not sure i should ask this here, but I'm doing the blues lead series and i want to know if i should do it with an acoustic guitar... I'm in the lesson 5 i think, but with my acoustic it's really hard to make the bends.. i cant even do a tone bend, only semitone... it just hurts my fingers like hell! especially at the 1st string.. i was just wondering, maybe its because I'm using an acoustic, maybe with an electric it's easier..

Offline close2u

  • Administrator
  • All Time Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 16060
  • Good Vibes 680
  • Teesside, North East England.
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #39 on: July 11, 2010, 11:59:11 am »
yes
an acoustic can be used for blues improv and Justin has some video showing this ... but bending is really an electric thing for most of us

Davidox

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #40 on: July 11, 2010, 12:06:37 pm »
Hmm ok, going to do it then
Thanks man  :)

Used n Abluesed

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2010, 02:38:40 pm »
Hello folks, just registered to the site today and here is my first post; Am I correct in assuming that I don't have to stick to soloing in order of position? for example; could I solo in pos.1 and go into say for example pos.5 and then pos.3? And one more thing, the Am pentatonic starts on the 5th fret (which I'm sure you're all aware) if I move down to G (3rd fret) then would all the positions shift down 2 frets aswell or are they altered? Quite a basic question but I'd rather know if I;m making a mistake before it becomes a bad habit.

Much appreciated, keep up the good work :) - Liam

XamTheOne

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #42 on: August 10, 2010, 09:54:34 pm »
Hello folks, just registered to the site today and here is my first post; Am I correct in assuming that I don't have to stick to soloing in order of position? for example; could I solo in pos.1 and go into say for example pos.5 and then pos.3? And one more thing, the Am pentatonic starts on the 5th fret (which I'm sure you're all aware) if I move down to G (3rd fret) then would all the positions shift down 2 frets aswell or are they altered? Quite a basic question but I'd rather know if I;m making a mistake before it becomes a bad habit.

Much appreciated, keep up the good work :) - Liam

It is not a bad technique, in fact I would recommend it!  Knowing how to switch to different positions is very useful.  I have to work on that (note on mental TODO list...)

Used n Abluesed

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2010, 11:10:21 pm »
Thanks, Xam! I was 90% sure It was ok but just wanted to be 100% as I don't want to pick up any more bad playing habits, Quite a pain to unlearn :)

Arjan

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #44 on: September 14, 2010, 09:53:30 am »
Hello Justin, real beginners question here.
I'm pretty used to strum major and minor chords now and want to start to play the bluess.

Yeah

I have some trouble with the minor pent. scale, becaurse often I can't find the right string. It's just like my left and my right hand don't communicate to each other. Do you use your fingers (which fingers for which strings) or do you use a pick? Any good tips?

Thank a lot for your anwser and all the lessons before, Arjan

Offline Phalanx

  • Pub Night Playa
  • ***
  • Posts: 189
  • Good Vibes 3
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #45 on: September 14, 2010, 10:13:29 am »
That's just normal Arjan. Everyone who starts out playing scales (or individual strings for that matter) will fail at first. They key is to to it very, very, very slow. What I did when I was learning the first Min. Pent. position was: first practise without a metronome dead slow so you get every note clear. Then put the metronome on 40bpm and just start playing along. In time you will notice you get better and then it might be a good time to move the speed up. If you practise this every day for five minutes you will be playing this scale at full speed before you know it.

Oh, and use your pick for scale practise. :)

Arjan

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #46 on: September 15, 2010, 11:17:05 pm »
Thanx a lot Phalanx. Playing along on 40bpm is no problem. Tomorrow I will be moving the tempo up a little.

Nan0guy

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #47 on: September 25, 2010, 11:52:43 pm »
Hi

I'm having a problem, basically the same problem with a lot of blues licks; Justin's and others.

Basically, when playing blues licks I'm getting too much noise when I let go of one string to play the string underneath :-[.

For example if I do a 'flick-off' on the second string with my third finger, use that finger to play a note on the third string and then go back to the second string (this move appear in Position 1 Lick 5 and Position 2 lick 4 among others, its very common) I often hear a noise, a quiet pull off to the open third string beneath the second string note I play.

It's not a big deal on acoustic, but through an amp with a bit of gain it becomes very intrusive. I'm not sure its a problem I've always had or one that's just started to annoy me now ???.

I've tried a couple of things to fix this. Like (for the above example) using my index finger on the second string to just touch and mute the third string. However this usually requires my hand to be much squarer with the fret board than feels natural for blues, and messes up the rest of my playing and flow, particularly with bends. I've tried trying to mute with my picking hand but can't find a method that doesn't dampen the strings I want to ring out or that can be moved to other strings.

I hope that's clear ;D. Anyone have similar problems could give me a tip on sorting this out, or do I hope that these 'invading' notes aren't noticable under my actually played notes.


tomdegraaf

  • Guest
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #48 on: October 04, 2010, 07:50:58 am »
Hi Justin,

started playing a few months ago, on a steel-string acoustic (Seagull Maritime).
After learning rhythm stuff and some songs, I recently fell in love with the blues. I'm trying to go through your blues course, but the bending and such is really quite hard.

My question is: is it reasonable to want to play blues like in your course - licks and all - on an acoustic, or do I really need an electric for all these bends.

Ill get an electric in six months, but I'd like to know if I should rather wait with your course until i have those easier-to-bend electric strings. (btw - epiphone dot 335, epi les paul, or regular beginner's electric by squier or so?))

Summary: can I play the same blues on my acoustic or am I making life too difficult for myself?

thanks for your site - I will certainly purchase your blues box sets when I get my electric guitar!

Tom

Offline Phalanx

  • Pub Night Playa
  • ***
  • Posts: 189
  • Good Vibes 3
Re: BL-400 • Essential Blues Lead Guitar Introduction
« Reply #49 on: October 04, 2010, 10:03:57 am »
Bending is hard on a acoustic, no doubt about it. I also want to start the blues lead guitar course, but first I'm going to buy an electric. I'm sure the licks are possible on a acoustic, but why make it extra difficult for yourself?

If you are planning to buy an electric, like me, I would just wait until you got one.

 

Get The Forum As A Mobile App