Author Topic: ET-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural / Ear Development  (Read 24103 times)

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Offline justinguitar

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« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 03:19:57 pm by Indigo »
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

flowerofdarkness

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2009, 12:38:47 pm »
hmm.... not sure if this is going up on the correct  bit, so i apologise now!!!

Ive teach beginners Guitar and would like to know if anyone else has found another song for the major 6th interval as i mainly teach 10-12 that have never heard of 'My Way'!!! any suggestions??!?!! flower xxx

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2009, 02:22:03 am »
I have a question about the singing excercises.  Would an easier way of remembering the pitch name be sing the the letter name of the note so that when you hear a pitch you'll recognize the note name?  Or is that too much work? 

So e.g. would be to play the note C but instead of just humming the pitch say the note C as you sing and then continue the excercise. 

Does someone understand what I'm trying to get at?  And does anyone have an answer? 

aging_bimbo

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2009, 08:45:50 am »
I have a question about the singing excercises.  Would an easier way of remembering the pitch name be sing the the letter name of the note so that when you hear a pitch you'll recognize the note name?  Or is that too much work? 

So e.g. would be to play the note C but instead of just humming the pitch say the note C as you sing and then continue the excercise. 

Does someone understand what I'm trying to get at?  And does anyone have an answer? 

Not sure there'd be much point as I think the pitch name is irrelevant - what you're training your ear to recognise/reproduce is the interval. Since most of us don't have absolute pitch and are highly unlikely to develop it.

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2009, 01:40:33 am »
That I know.  It's just I have a friend whose better at guitar playing and he can listen to something and know exactly what chords and notes are playing.  As much as that may be called perfect pitch, I've known him for awhile and I know for a fact he doesn't.  He won't tell me how he did it.  He did say he worked at it but he won't tell me his trick. 

aging_bimbo

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2009, 03:26:27 am »
Guess it couldn't hurt to sing the note names, maybe singing, eg, "C, G" or "D, A" would help that interval get fixed in your brain. It would certainly help you learn the intervals on the theoretical side. On the other hand it might, conceivably, distract you from learning the interval from a purely aural point of view. The brain works in mysterious ways! 

Be interesting to know how your friend does it - but if he can name a note he hears, wouldn't you call that perfect pitch? Some people do apparently hear different keys in different colours, or feelings. So it is possible that if he takes that as a starting point he could then identify the notes relatively, I guess. Some people also seem to be able to hear the intervals within a chord, so if you know the order of the intervals within the chord from string to string, you can narrow down the chord possibilities.

I'm just speculating, really - it's all a bit of a mystery to me! But a fascinating one.

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2009, 03:43:54 am »
Yeah I guess so.  I'm not trying to shoot you down or to be right...it's a little aggravating and frustrating to go through aural training.  Maybe I did ask a dumb question.    :-\

aging_bimbo

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2009, 03:48:14 am »
Yeah I guess so.  I'm not trying to shoot you down or to be right...it's a little aggravating and frustrating to go through aural training.  Maybe I did ask a dumb question.    :-\

No such thing as a dumb question. And like I said, just speculating. It would be interesting to hear an answer from someone (not me) who actually knows!

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2009, 01:10:47 am »
Yeah, it would be interesting.   :-\

bobg

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2009, 12:26:50 am »
The idea of singing the note names of intervals - C G, D A etc scares me when I think, when I have (hopefully) mastered them in C, I might want to practise them in, say Eb! Think i will have to save that till later, still trying to get the ears to work on the intervals, let alone remember stuff like where the sharps and flats come! Hope I am not the only one...  best regards Justin and all. :)

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2009, 12:56:31 am »
After having music theory, I have the sound of the intervals in my head, but to me it's no use unless you know you're notes pretty well if not your starting pitch.  That's just me.  I tend to hold myself to high expectations sometimes. 

Beak

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2009, 03:44:38 am »
I would suggest having a general feel for the intervals (Perf 4th, ect) before you start singing the note names. Perhaps it's just me, but I think having a strong base is essential. For example, if you can play the exact intervals that say, David Gilmour is playing in a solo, then you've got it. You're just not in the right key, and from there I'd imagine it's only a hop and a skip from pegging that down.

Another way of looking at it is if you sing the note names and memorize them to a pitch, you may get lost say if you forget one note and the person plays that. Knowing what the intervals sound like would help you with that.

And that's my little take on that subject. Memorizing both would be extremely helpful, in any case, and you probably shouldn't ignore one way for the other.

Keeping in line with the thread; talking chromatically here, everything would just be minor, yeah? A semitone up from one note would be a minor 2nd, and then the tone a major 2nd, then minor 3rd? Or would they be called 'Flatted 2nds, flattened 3rds?' Didn't see any reference to the interval names of all the chromatics in the lesson. If it's there, sorry for the unnecessary question.

Sl8sh

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2009, 03:25:03 am »
Huh....never thought of it that way.  Interesting question.....

Bennieblaze

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #13 on: September 05, 2009, 10:52:38 am »
Hey Justin i've bin following your channel on YouTube and it hs bin alot of help...wanted to ask you how i could work on my ear training without my guitar. And could you pls explain the intervals i.e how to use them as a tool in ear training.thanks :)

Flat9

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2009, 01:48:51 pm »
I realise that you asked for the Major 6th interval song reference months ago, but I have only just come across it. Try 'Hush Little Baby', the first two notes!

stof

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2010, 09:12:07 am »
When using the site
http://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-interval/

do you try to reproduce the interval on your guitar or
use the virtual keyboard to find the answer ?


Offline justinguitar

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #16 on: October 13, 2010, 11:11:37 pm »
I realise that you asked for the Major 6th interval song reference months ago, but I have only just come across it. Try 'Hush Little Baby', the first two notes!

good one dude!
"You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room." Dr. Seuss

fosterjam14

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2010, 04:34:00 am »
I' ve been writing the intervals of your song list out in order.  For example Some-where o= ver the rain- bow is
                                                                                                         1        8    7     5   6     7     8
Is this a very simplified version of transcribing?  Also I noticed he, Justin, has not mentioned solfege  maybe it's a little out of date but it's advantage is when you get into b's and #'s  Instead of saying minor seventh you would say 'tay'  the b of te.
(do-ra-me-fa-so-la-te-do) in other words a single syllable.  For the past month I've tried to learn these as a interval a day so by day 12 I'm back to the beginning but will try this instead to see if it works better.  I suppose the goal is to know your intervals in any order so when transcribing the melody it's not hunt and peck but dead on.  At least that would be my goal.

gregsi

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2011, 10:04:44 pm »
Major 6th =>  opening notes in Beatles "Two of Us" (white album -- easy to find on youtube)

DoctorJohn

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Re: AU-003 • Struggling with Aural Development HELP NEEDED!
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2012, 02:29:02 pm »
I've been struggling with the interval stage 2 ans aural training stage 3 exams getting less than 50% right on tests.   

Does anyone have any tips to assist in recognising chords?  My method has been to determine if it's a sad or happy sound to identify minor or major than backing into the chord.  It works sometimes but not most.  Now at stage three there are 8 chords and it's two many to choose from I'm have a hard time recognising them.   I am good at recognising the D And Dm chords.  The other six chords sound so similar I struggle to differentiate the sounds. 

For example E, Em , Am and A to me all get intertwined, cant quite tell the difference, if I could sort these out I'd be ok I think!  I'd like to use Justin stay relaxed tip, but I cant help but getting frustrated and discouraged because I'm not seeing the progress like I do with improving scores om 1 minute changes.   

Any suggestions to help here? 


Offline PattheBunny

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2012, 06:30:48 pm »
The lowest note will usually stand out.  And at this point it's the root note of the chord.  If you can hear that note, you can probably name the chord.  Think of it in scale degrees.    Maybe assume the scale is C?  I haven't been at that lesson in a while but it probably is.   ????

Pat
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Offline sophiehiker

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Re: AU-003 • Singing Exercises For Aural Development
« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2012, 07:10:18 pm »
I haven't tried this technique myself, but I was planning to...

Arrainge the eight chords in random order.  Record yourself playing one of the chords and, after a moment, identify the chord on the recording.  Fill a 60 minute tape with these chords in random order.  Then listen to it, doing your best to identify each chord before your voice on the tape is heard.  No cheating by using the guitar to find these chords!  Rely on your ears and make your best guess.

Hope this helps...
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