Author Topic: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios  (Read 59635 times)

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Offline GreenAsJade

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2009, 07:25:02 am »
In respect of the Mag7 D shape, Justin writes:

"You could always experiment yourself and see what you find ;)"

I think that using the 3rd finger for both notes on the B string is a leap forwards in ease... a very easy clean little slide is all that's needed.

GaJ

Srdjan

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2009, 07:47:53 pm »
If you do it all as barres you'll end up with notes ringing out forever and then your arpeggio sounds more like a chord than individual notes, which kind of makes the whole thing pointless.

So, should I barre with 2nd finger in D shape or 3rd finger in A shape? Without barre I can't play it fast.

diango

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2009, 11:11:56 pm »
hi,

what i want to know is over the e major 7 Arpeggio shape can i play only e major chord or only e major 7 chord or both ?


Offline hmtaylor

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2009, 09:26:35 pm »
sort of along with what diango said.......


if arpeggio means "notes of a chord" then why are the lessons dealing with major/minor dominant 7ths???

i would think that if your chord progression was A, E, D  you would want to play a "major A, E then D" arpeggio over the progression (at the appropriate places)

so, are the "Major 7th arpeggios" just adding the 7th of the major scale?  And if it is...then why bother adding the 7th if the major chords only have a roote/3rd/5th?  Is it because the 7th sounds good too?  I'm a little confused...it seems that a major 7th arpeggio would really be the notes of a 'major 7th chord (if that makes sense?)


MAYBE IT WOULD BE EASIER IF: someone could explain WHICH ARPEGGIO FORM (i.e. primarily the ones on this website which seem rather exhaustive) would be played over what chords? 


PetriDish227

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2009, 11:53:51 pm »
Hey Justin,

Are you by any chance going to make a video version of some of your arpeggio lessons??  Cheers, great site!

Dash Rendar

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2009, 10:49:26 am »
To answer the queries from diango and hmtaylor, you have to recall how the chords are assembled for a given key.  For example, if you take the C major scale, the notes (as you all know) are:

C D E F G A B

The chords that fit this scale are assembled - at the most basic level - by taking alternating notes from the scale.  So, for example, the chord built on the C note of the C major scale would be assembled by taking the first, third and fifth notes.  Thus we have CEG, which is our C major scale.

If we do the same for the chord based on the D note of the C major scale, we have to take the D (the 2nd note) and then add the 4th and 6th notes of the scale.  Thus we have DFA, which is Dmin.

The E chord that fits within the C major scale would be assembled from 3rd, 5th and 7th notes: EGB, which is Emin.  If we continue through the whole scale, we find that the following chords can all sound good within the context of a song written in C:

I.  C
ii. Dm
iii.Em
IV. F
V.  G
vi. Am
VII Bdim

We're most of us familiar with a typical blues or rock progression using the I, IV, V pattern.  The breakdown above shows us why this sounds good and why it works.

Now, all the chords above are triads.  Thus, playing the notes individually from these chords gives you 3-note arpeggios.

But, rather than assemble all the chords using just three notes, we can assemble them using four, called quadads.  If we do the same thing, the chord list now looks like this:

I.  Cmaj7
ii. Dm7
iii.Em7
IV. Fmaj7
V.  G7 (dominant 7)
vi. Am7
VII Bdim

Note that when assembled as quadads, the chords all end up as 7th chords of some flavour or other.  Recall that major 7th chords are assembled using the 7th note of the scale (specically, the scale from which the chord root came from), whereas dominant 7th (and minor 7th) chords are assembled using the flattened 7th note of the scale.

So, if we play the arpeggios that make up these chords, we now have the 4-note arpeggios that Justin describes in his lessons.

Back to the original question, which was basically... can you play a maj7 arpeggio over a major chord, a major 7th chord, or both?

Well, you can always play a major 7th arpeggio over a major 7th chord, since that's the chord the arpeggio was assembled from.  You can *sometimes* play the major 7th chord over the major chord, but this depends on how the chord is being used in the progression, and the mode of the progression.  For example, in a typical I, IV, V using the C Ionian mode, a C major 7th arpeggio should sound fine over the C major chord.   And, if a song has a root chord in the Lydian mode, then a major 7th arpeggio sounds perfect, since the Lydian mode has a raised 4th degree, meaning that the 'I' chord (quadad) assembled from the Lydian scale will always be a Major 7th chord.

However, you could never play, say a V Major 7th arpeggio over the V chord in a typical I, IV, V progression, because the V chord - even though it may be played as a major chord - would be a dominant 7th chord if all four notes were used (as indicated in the list above). For example, in a C, F, G rock progression, if you were to switch your arpeggios with every chord change, then you should use a G7 arpeggio (or a 3-note G major arpeggio) over the G chord, but definitely not a G major 7 arpeggio.  But, over the C, you could use a three-note major arpeggio, or a C major 7 arpeggio, to give it a more modal or jazzy feel.  And, you could play an F major 7 arpeggio over the F, or simply a three-note F major arpeggio.

I think this is where, in order to make the most out of arpeggios within chord progressions, it's probably a good idea to have an understanding of the modes, since the theory overlaps.

Hope that helps...

cellblade

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2010, 08:34:32 pm »
could someone explain simply what an Arpeggio is? 

batifoulier

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #32 on: December 02, 2010, 09:01:39 am »
Hello Justin,

do you use the rolling technique to play the arpeggios?


en4ian

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #33 on: April 30, 2011, 04:57:15 pm »
Place the second finger on the 9th fret and you will play the C Major 7th arpeggio (because the note at the 9th fret of the 6th string is the note C#)

I don't understand this part. Shouldn't it be C# Major 7th arpeggio? Since the root note would be C#?

fishingblade1889

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #34 on: August 04, 2011, 04:23:56 pm »
hi all basic theory thicko here, I have learnt the A major arpeggio and the D major arpeggio, my question is do I play all the arpeggio or pick out notes from the arpeggio to the A major chord and the D chord thanks

old mumbler

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #35 on: November 21, 2011, 09:31:07 am »
Ok, great stuff on Arpeggios, I get it but...how do I "know" which chords are being played when on say a backing track to practice over?  Is it just a matter of learning the backing track first so that you are chord perfect with every part of it?

Offline BDC

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #36 on: November 22, 2011, 02:16:11 pm »
I'm just starting to get a handle on using arpeggio's but basically, yes ...... you need to know the chord progression to be able to use the arps.  Each time the chord changes you'll be using a different arpeggio.

flosideon1

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #37 on: January 08, 2012, 12:07:28 am »
alright i have one question about all of this- are these positions moveable, can i take the 1st position, E, and place the root on an F, and it will be F. Im confused on why the positions are labeled as either an E,D,C,A, or G. Are those the arpeggios for the chords they are being named after, if so, what about B and F ?

Offline close2u

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #38 on: January 08, 2012, 08:09:04 am »
alright i have one question about all of this- are these positions moveable, can i take the 1st position, E, and place the root on an F, and it will be F.
Yes

Quote
Im confused on why the positions are labeled as either an E,D,C,A, or G. Are those the arpeggios for the chords they are being named after, if so, what about B and F ?

EDCAG = CAGED = CAGED system ... the 5 underlying chord shapes are named after the open C, A, G, E, D chord shapes ... but the pattern sequence starts with an E shape  .. therefore EDCAG

you need to know about CAGED if you are learning arpeggios

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/TB-031-CAGEDsystem1.php

Offline misterg

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #39 on: January 09, 2012, 12:15:07 am »
..are these shapes moveable, can i take the first position, E shape, and put the root on any note, using F for example and make it into a major 7th F arpeggio ?

Yes :)

Andy

Offline dezag.c

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #40 on: September 02, 2013, 07:59:17 pm »
Hi i've got a basic question that i'm struggling to understand

I can follow  the lesson  and know  how work out the intervals  for the major 7th ie if you play it in A you would start on the  5th fret of the 6th string and then  work out the intervals in relation to the A major scale

what I don't understand is why is this not called  an A major  arpeggio ( instead of the A major 7th)  if we are using the major scale

is there such a thing as an A major arpeggio  and  what notes   are in this  and what is the difference between this and a major 7th arpeggio

hope that makes sense

Offline stitch101

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #41 on: September 02, 2013, 08:21:12 pm »
Quote
what I don't understand is why is this not called  an A major  arpeggio ( instead of the A major 7th)  if we are using the major scale

An Arpeggio is the note of a Chord not the notes in the major scale. The A major Arpeggio is the R(A) 3rd(C#) and 5th(E) the A major 7th is R 3rd 5th 7th. Playing these notes one at a time in a solo or one
at a time as a chord is what makes it an Arpeggio.

You can use any chord or notes of a chord

Offline dezag.c

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #42 on: September 03, 2013, 01:22:37 pm »
Hi Stitch

does that mean  the only difference between the two arpeggios is that in the 7th Arpeggio you  play  4 notes  with the last note being the 7th interval

wheres in a major arpeggio you only play 3 notes  R  3 & 5

is that correct

thanks

Offline stitch101

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #43 on: September 03, 2013, 04:48:32 pm »
Hi Stitch

does that mean  the only difference between the two arpeggios is that in the 7th Arpeggio you  play  4 notes  with the last note being the 7th interval

wheres in a major arpeggio you only play 3 notes  R  3 & 5

is that correct

thanks


Yes but You don't have to play the 7th last. If soloing using arpeggio you use only the notes in the
chord. So if your playing over major or minor chord you would only use the R 3rd(b3rd for minor) and 5th.
Over a 7th chord you can use the 7th, playing over a 9th you use the 9th etc.

If you play a chord one note at a time that is called arpeggiating a chord. Here's the proper definition

arpeggiating  present participle of ar·peg·gi·ate
Verb
Play (a chord) as a series of ascending or descending notes.


Offline TB-AV

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Re: AR-001 • Major 7th Arpeggios
« Reply #44 on: September 03, 2013, 05:03:51 pm »
No it means an arpeggio is a collection of notes that exactly match a -specific- chord.

Here, try this exercise.

Chord: Adom7 aka A7 .. Notes equal A C# E G ... now map those notes across your fretboard and play at will. One note at a time. That's an A7 arpeggio. Now strum an A7 chord. that's an A7 chord. Same notes, two different methods.


Chord: A7#9 = A C# E G B ... now map those notes across your fretboard and play them one at a time. That's an A7#9 arpeggio. Strum the chord, play the arpeggio. Same notes, two differnt methods of application.

Chord: F#mAug#9  = F# A D G# -- again map the notes on neck, play one at a time.


======= How do you do it?

Name Chord --- any possible chord that anyone can think of
Obtain Chord Spelling Chart -- free everywhere on Internet
Determine from spelling chart the required notes to spell chord
map those notes on fretboard
play those notes one at a time via any means and order you deem appropriate

ETA: Areas of mental confusion to be avoided
1. Chords are always played from lowest note to highest... FALSE. Chords are played in may different orders, Inversions, high to low, low to high, middle to low to high, middle to high  to low, makes not difference, it's still a chord

2. Arpeggios need to be played in order of notes..... FALSE... just like chords, play the notes any way you like.... The point is while band is playing a certain harmony such as an A7 chord, you too will be playing A7 notes in the form of an arpeggio and thus it will sound good because you are all playing the same notes.

ETA2: Practical application.

The band is playing A7 E7 repeating. If you know your A7 and E7 arpeggios you really can't play anything -wrong- provided your timing is good. You will be playing the same notes they are playing. That get's boring though and limits you. So you use your arpeggio notes and knowledge as your home base or safety net.  At the same time you use other notes to approach them, to highlight them, to add suspense, to add interest... those other notes are any of the other 12 available notes and it's up to you how you go about applying them. When you need to take a breather, think, change ideas, then just fall back on your arpeggio notes and you will be locked in with the band.


« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 05:19:28 pm by TB-AV »
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