Author Topic: TE-301 • Scale Picking  (Read 78074 times)

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KRIBER

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #50 on: September 17, 2009, 07:22:16 pm »
Hi Sl8sh,
Something whic helps me a lot as weel to work with 16th note is to tap my foot every 4 notes (each tick of the metronome) and even to softly put an accent on all 4th notes.
try that if you 're not already doing it, it will help u for such.

The benefit to work as I mentioned previoulsy, only with right hand, is the fact that you can concentrate on what your pick is doing and still keep this bloody question in mind: "how can I improve that to go faster?".
some of tips are to attack the string not having your pick flat but with an angle / minimum movement during down and upstroke / relax your wrist and all muscles. you can explore many different things to improve your speed.
cheers

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #51 on: September 17, 2009, 10:05:03 pm »
I don't tap my foot because it is considered unprofessional.  My primary instrument, as many people on the forum know, is the double French Horn so I count mentally in my head which is what the "professionals" do.  However, I tend to do alot of head banging when I'm playing guitar though because I find that when I lock solidly into a tempo, then I get a really cool groove going. 

The other reason my left hand is faster is after playing Horn continuously for almost 7 years for about 3 hours a day, the left hand gets alot of dexterity from having to play fast.  The French Horn, similarly to the guitar if you are right handed, the valved hand is the left hand.  And my fingers move faster than my tongue. 

The funny thing is is I can play quarter notes and eighth notes at the top tempo on my metronome which is 216bpm and they come out clean.  !6th notes are harder because I'm still not used to doing both hammer ons and pull offs in order to play 16th notes more smoothly and faster. 

KRIBER

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #52 on: September 18, 2009, 07:13:44 pm »
being french, I have already experimented the double French Horn as a lot of people use to play that instrument in my village.
I found it really difficult as one hand is doing the rhythmic and the other one the melody. 7 years / 3h a day!! you must play well.
I'm have a guitar since 25 years now but I know nothing about music except for some basic theory and I really start since 2 month playing  1 to 5 hours a day.
the problem is that I'm focused on the music style I like and it doesn't seems to be the easiest music to start with, especially when you would like to play some Iron Maiden / metallica / satriani or gun's and roses solos.
for all solos I dream about, the metronome must be set to something like 120 minimum (16th) and that's really a challenge for me.
I 'm not really stressed about how long it Will take as I know I will never be a guitar hero but I really struggle To in order to be able to have fun covering some of players I appreciate.
all the best

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #53 on: September 18, 2009, 10:02:36 pm »
As far as my playing capabilities go with horn, 3 hours a day doesn't mean that I've hammered out all my problems with the instrument.  It truly is, if you are committed to it, a life long instrument and everyone progresses differently on the horn just like people progress differently with guitar. 

A book my horn teacher recommended to me for light reading was called "A Devil To Play".  It's about a guy who used to play horn and then in his mid life crisis decides to pick it up again and play at the British Horn Society in a years time.  It will give some insight into how French Horn players see the world.  And not every horn player sees things the same way.  Just mentioned it if you were interested. 

KRIBER

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #54 on: September 20, 2009, 07:54:04 am »
I will have a look if I can source this book; could be interresting..
Anyway regarding Guitar, it is true that there are 1000's of thinks to try as exercices to improve picking and dexterity but there is only one way to progress which is to pratice every day with a metronome.
as I said before, my goal is to be good enough to have fun with my guitar.
I am doing so many different things that I can only achieve to be good with all that I'm doing but not more.
people which have only one passion can achieve to be perfect. it is a personnal choice.
Now it is time for me to  pick up my jackson and switch on my metronome.
see you then and all the best.
cheers

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #55 on: September 20, 2009, 05:33:05 pm »
Thanks. 

Offline Jecc

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #56 on: September 28, 2009, 08:56:02 am »
Right now, I'm following the 1 hour intermediate practice routine and it seems to working great cause I don't feel as if I'm wasting my time doodling when I pick up the guitar. However when it comes to the 5 minutes of scale picking, the area between my thumb and index finger starts to hurt at about my second or third down and up and as I continue it progressively starts to hurt more to the point where I have to take a small break for the pain to subside. I always dismissed this cause I thought it was just strengthening the muscles in that area and I would eventually get passed it but of course it hasn't yet. I place my thumb square on the back of the neck however it seems if I move it higher up toward the top of the neck when I'm fretting the higher strings (b, high e) the pain starts to subside a bit. Anyway, my question is, is this normal? Could it be something wrong with my technique?

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #57 on: September 28, 2009, 11:23:47 pm »
Hard to say.  It could be your technique or it could be that you might be gripping something too hard.  It might even be your string gauge.  It could be a multitude of things that I don't know.  Think of all the things that could cause the pain and slowly test each one out to figure out what you are doing wrong. 

Not the best advice but sometimes the good old trial and error model seems to fit here. 

I'm not an expert.  That's what I think could be wrong because I don't have these kinds of issues when I play.  So it's interesting for me to read how some of these problems occur. 

thekidkid32

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #58 on: November 09, 2009, 09:35:21 pm »
Right now, I'm following the 1 hour intermediate practice routine and it seems to working great cause I don't feel as if I'm wasting my time doodling when I pick up the guitar. However when it comes to the 5 minutes of scale picking, the area between my thumb and index finger starts to hurt at about my second or third down and up and as I continue it progressively starts to hurt more to the point where I have to take a small break for the pain to subside. I always dismissed this cause I thought it was just strengthening the muscles in that area and I would eventually get passed it but of course it hasn't yet. I place my thumb square on the back of the neck however it seems if I move it higher up toward the top of the neck when I'm fretting the higher strings (b, high e) the pain starts to subside a bit. Anyway, my question is, is this normal? Could it be something wrong with my technique?

I'm having a similar problem.  I've been doing this exercise for a few days and have seen it improve my coordination a whole lot, but my wrist is killing me.  It isn't a crazy amount of pain.  But i can feel that it does not feel right, even in everyday activities.  I'm giving it a break and hoping it will heal up, but would could be the problem? It seems to really only be this exercise that does it, although playing contributes obviously.  The area between my pinky and wrist hurts a lot when I get to the lower strings, but no problems on the higher ones.  Any idea what I could be doing wrong?

Fuzzel

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #59 on: November 11, 2009, 09:48:55 pm »
The angle of your wrist in the usual suspect. Make sure when you practicing it's always as straight as possible. If that's not it then I'll try and think of what else it could be....

bigoli

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2009, 04:49:29 am »
Hey
Just a beginner here, i'm trying to master the lower speeds (120 bpm (1 note per click)). When I see justin doing it I notice he is looking at the camera. When I do it i have to fixate on the fret otherwise i start missing notes. Should I try and do it while looking away or is staring at the fretboard fine?
Also, should I be keeping my fingers on the strings while playing higher notes?
Cheers

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #61 on: November 19, 2009, 05:18:37 am »
Wecome Bigoli - everyone has to look at the fretboard when they learn new stuff. Once you know it you will naturally tend to look around a bit so it isn't a problem.

Ultimately where you look is up to you, if you just play in your bedroom staring at the fretboard is no problem - but if you intend to play to an audience you might want to get some eye contact going.

Not sure exactly what you meant with your 2nd question.

Cheers, Bootstrap
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

mvk20

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #62 on: November 19, 2009, 06:10:54 pm »
I'm assuming Bigoli means do you continue to fret the notes behind the current note - leaving your index finger in place while playing with your third or fourth finger, for example.  My answer would be no, I'm generally already moving that finger to get on the first note on the next higher string, but maybe someone has a different answer...

bigoli

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2009, 01:13:49 am »
Yea thats what i meant, cheers for your help, spent like 3 hours on this last night and it sort of worked itself out 8)

asguard44

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #64 on: December 04, 2009, 08:41:26 am »
I would dearly love to master scale picking but I have hit a rather annoying couple of setbacks.

Setback 1 - I have a really bad habit of completely missing a string with my pick suddenly after a couple of runs of the scale. Happens at random and I can be totally focused on the run and then my pick just misses. Very frustrating.

Setback 2 - I am absolutely fine at doing the alternate picking up to 115bpm of the metronome set on 8th notes but as soon as I start at 120 I get an incredible ache in the pinky. It aches mainly down by the knuckle and makes the finger go all stiff and its like someone takes control of my hand and tries to push it off the fretboard. As soon as I get the pain I put the geet down and it stops hurting almost immediately.
Makes my wrist hurt a bit aswell. Not sure if it happens to anyone else but I find it quite worrying actually because there is a history in my dads side of the family of that hand problem where all your fingers contract into your hand and become unmovable (Dupuytren’s Disease). My fingers are quite straight and healthy so I am praying I just have weak muscles and it goes away. Maybe I should do a few days on 115-120 and see how it goes.
Trying this with the minimum movement technique before hand aswell but the little one refuses to co-operate but thats not for here lol.

Offline Bootstrap

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #65 on: December 04, 2009, 12:30:16 pm »
Dude problem 1 - we've all been there - slow down and remember the 3P rule - perfect practice makes perfect.

For problem 2 - try ice.
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

asguard44

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #66 on: December 05, 2009, 09:43:09 am »
Cheers Bootstrap.

I bought one of those little stress balls yesterday to squeeze the fingers about. I stick a couple of yes songs on through the headphones and just work the fingers for around 15 minutes. You can actually feel the fingers stretching at times and as a bonus you don't feel like smashing your head through the window when your picking's gone wrong Lol.
Cheers.

Christo16

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #67 on: December 07, 2009, 03:57:27 am »
i really have no idea where to post this anywhere else but here. i've heard from a lot of people about a technique called sweeping. i have no idea how it works and what the use of it is for. maybe a lesson on sweeping would a lot of people some good.

thanks, chris


Offline Bootstrap

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #68 on: December 07, 2009, 04:17:23 am »
Chris - check out the first U-stream video Justin did (link from home page) - Justin gives a brief description and demo but admits it isn't something he is very good at and therefore won't do a lesson on.

Cheers, Bootstrap
The best guitar is the one you have in your hands
Road Case last update 11 Mar 2012

thekidkid32

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #69 on: December 16, 2009, 10:52:35 pm »
I would dearly love to master scale picking but I have hit a rather annoying couple of setbacks.

Setback 1 - I have a really bad habit of completely missing a string with my pick suddenly after a couple of runs of the scale. Happens at random and I can be totally focused on the run and then my pick just misses. Very frustrating.

Setback 2 - I am absolutely fine at doing the alternate picking up to 115bpm of the metronome set on 8th notes but as soon as I start at 120 I get an incredible ache in the pinky. It aches mainly down by the knuckle and makes the finger go all stiff and its like someone takes control of my hand and tries to push it off the fretboard. As soon as I get the pain I put the geet down and it stops hurting almost immediately.
Makes my wrist hurt a bit aswell. Not sure if it happens to anyone else but I find it quite worrying actually because there is a history in my dads side of the family of that hand problem where all your fingers contract into your hand and become unmovable (Dupuytren’s Disease). My fingers are quite straight and healthy so I am praying I just have weak muscles and it goes away. Maybe I should do a few days on 115-120 and see how it goes.
Trying this with the minimum movement technique before hand aswell but the little one refuses to co-operate but thats not for here lol.

Be careful man, it could just be weak muscles but this exact same exercise has put me out of playing for well over a month.  It started off just hurting a little and barely even noticeable but I know that it is this exact exercise that led to what I believe to have been tendinitis and probably a mild case of Carpal Tunnel too.  I'm just finally starting to get back into playing again but it still hurts a bit.  Just be careful man that's all, I'll never do it again.

asguard44

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #70 on: December 17, 2009, 09:05:20 am »
Sorry to hear you suffered mate. I have come to the conclusion now that I am kidding myself trying to do this scale picking. I am 45 years old now and I really don't think there is any chance of making my fingers more supple and looser. Besides which, my pinky hurts more and more now so I believe it is doing my hand a lot of damage so the girlfriend has pleaded with me to leave the picking alone a while. When I stretch out the fingers on the fretting hand, index, middle and ring finger all feel fine and there is plenty of feeling there. Wheen I stretch Mr pinky it feels like there is no finger there like a numb sensation and then the side of the hand near the pinky down to the wrist has a tremendous ache as the finger is manipulated. Surely that can't be right can it?
Anyway going to rest it and stick to rhythm guitar I think for now. Proper cheesed off at the moment  :'(

Fuzzel

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2009, 01:32:41 am »
There's absolutely no chance that it's weak fingers at 8th notes at 120. You don't need to strengthen up your fingers you need to sort out your technique. The most likely possibility is that you tensing up you hand once you reach 120 which uses up was more energy is necessary and takes its toll most on the weakest fingers (3rd and 4th.) Combined with probably pressing too hard your fingers get a real battering, The problem is that people are always in too much of a rush to speed up. If i were I'd slow it down all the way to 80 and make sure your totally relaxed with each fretting motion. Give it 5 minutes a day at 80 for a couple of minutes then start pushing it up slowly again. Remember you've got years to get your speed up fot blazing picking runs, there's no point beating yourself up if it doesn't come instantly :)

asguard44

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2009, 11:14:30 am »
Cheers Fuzzel. Must point out though that I aint doing scale picking to be a speed demon on the guitar. I just started doing this to loosen my fingers in general. I am quite happy with my hand now on 120 bpm and I don't squeeze the neck as hard as I use to except when I try and do a bit of finger picking. All 4 left hand fingers still have a lot of tightness in them, especially when I straighten them out from bent. I think it's possibly related to the awful time I had with the frozen shoulders over the last couple of years.
BTW, I have back problems aswell and Justin recomended a kneel chair for bad back sufferers in one of his videos. Well I went and bought one and highly recomend them. Its made playing for me a hell of a lot easier. Cheers Justin.

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #73 on: February 01, 2010, 12:51:57 am »
Hope all is well with your playing.  Need some inspiration with a bad back, look at Mick Mars from Motley Crue.  He has a degenerative bone disease and he's still playing.  So don't give up!!!!!

asguard44

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #74 on: February 02, 2010, 03:54:44 pm »
Cheers Sl8sh. I don't intend giving up mate. I had surgery on my spine back in 1984 and 1991 because it was severely curved. Now 20 odd years later the working parts in my spine have had enough and have decided to throb a lot ;D Bit annoying when your trying to play something and you feel like someone has suddenly booted you right in the bottom of your back. Much easier with the kneel chair though.

Don't think my coordination is ever going to improve though trying to do this scale picking. I am fine at picking 8th notes up to about 180bpm but after that my brain goes dead and the concentration starts to dwindle. Don't mind being stuck at 180 though. Thought I wasn't going further at 120 a while back so there is still hope ;)

 

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