Author Topic: TE-301 • Scale Picking  (Read 78077 times)

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Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2009, 06:17:38 am »
To rendelven:

What kind of set up should I do or have the shop do?  I bought it from a shop that is going pro in my area.  I love them but I'm really afraid of damaging it because for some reason its one that collectors want.  I loved it for its sound when I tried it out.  I didn't know what I bought at the time until I took it home that day and did some research on it.  I do want to increase in speed I just don't want to lose the sound of my guitar. 

And as far as the posting questions goes...thank you so much for the advice.  I'm just trying to not sound desperate or really really needy. 

rendelven

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #26 on: April 15, 2009, 06:10:58 pm »
What kind of set up should I do or have the shop do?  I bought it from a shop that is going pro in my area.  I love them but I'm really afraid of damaging it because for some reason its one that collectors want.  I loved it for its sound when I tried it out.  I didn't know what I bought at the time until I took it home that day and did some research on it.  I do want to increase in speed I just don't want to lose the sound of my guitar. 

And as far as the posting questions goes...thank you so much for the advice.  I'm just trying to not sound desperate or really really needy. 

You can take a look at this thread, http://www.justinguitarcommunity.com/index.php?topic=14023.0 , which is a sticky in the Equipment forum. I suggest following that guide to ensure that the guitar is setup properly. If you see that something is a bit off you can either try fixing it yourself or bring it into the shop.

The sound of your guitar should not change too much after undergoing a proper setup ( unless things like intonation, etc are out of whack ). If you are worried about them damaging your guitar then I suggest taking pictures and documenting it's current condition. Although, I wouldn't worry too much about them damaging the guitar in an attempt to get it from you.

I also recommend getting to know the people who work in the guitar shop(s) in your area.

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2009, 01:30:19 am »
Will do rendelven.  Thank you so much.  I'll take a look at the thread you posted. 

mangkyou

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2009, 07:04:02 pm »
hey when i have to pick the first or the second string i use to rely my picking hand on the 6th, 5th and 4th string, is that a bad technique?

Offline TomaszJ

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2009, 06:58:04 pm »
Well, I've got one question about correcting bad habits.
I've learned to play the scale but only with downstrokes and got to about 180bpm. Now trying to use alternate picking but struggling with strength and keeping this down/up motion. When I just play without thinking much what I'm doing I tend to employ economic picking albeit unconciously. I can get it right when I try to think about it and remember exactly what motion should be on which fret. Yet, playing faster than let's say 100bpm becomes a problem. Not too much time for thinking. Any tips?
And yeah, how fast I should gain speed? I'm trying to be as accurate as possible

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2009, 01:06:59 am »
TomaszJ

I had the same problem you had.  I could down stroke my scales at a tempo of 216 quarter notes and eighth notes were around 180 also.  It takes time to break this habit.  Start slowly at 60bpm like Justin suggests under techniques.  I have my alternate picking sorted when I play scales but when it comes to playing a song for me, unless the solo is very scaler I'm not paying attention because it messes me up to be honest.  It takes time and start slowly.  You're doing it right by being conscience about what you are doing right and what you are doing wrong.  It is tough to teach yourself. 

whiteboy1150

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #31 on: June 04, 2009, 01:45:28 am »
One thing I've always had trouble with is picking, it seems like my left hand develops at twice the rate my right hand does.

I've been playing about 6 months and I wanted to know from some experienced guitarists what is the best way to hold the pick and position your hand, while doing scales or any lead playing, for optimum speed and accuracy.

I've watched guitarists playing with a finger or two resting on the body or against the strings as an anchor, but I've also seen a lot of guitarists with their hand just floating above the strings in a fist. So I guess what I'm asking is what is the best way to position your hand when you're picking for speed and accuracy.

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #32 on: June 04, 2009, 02:21:19 am »
I don't know.  Whatever is comfortable for you.  I hold my pick wrong.  I guarentee it.  I can't play by holding my pick the way most textbooks show because then I feel like I don't have control over my picking. 

Work with a metronome to syncopate both hands.  And start slowly and then slowly speed up the excercise. 

The only reason my left hand has more speed is because after 7 years of playing French Horn your left hand gets alot of dexterity when you play really fast stuff that use really odd fingerings for notes. 

It took me a few weeks to syncopate my hands.  Everyone moves at their own pace. 

drumdrum

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #33 on: June 05, 2009, 09:06:18 am »
Quote
Hi,
 I have no problem doing 1/16th notes at 120, my worry is that I can't keep my thumb behind the neck, it seems akward to me.
 I tend to have my thumb verticle or sometimes hooked over the neck, I've always played that way and have no problem with speed and clarity.
when I try to position my thumb "properly" and make my fingers exactly verticle, It's totaly foreign. I've watched alot of pros and I see alot of them play the way I do. am I hindering myself or should I just continue the way I have been?

here's a video of a Steve Lukather tutoral  I found,, I wanted to post it because this is exactly how I use my left hand and thumb(of course I'm not as skilled)
I want to post this and ask ,,If he plays this way why shouldn't I?  thanks in advance


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUKSHViWNHw&feature=related

I've got the same question. My thumb is not hooked over the neck but it is completely horizontal and points to the headstock.
If I hold my thumb the classic way (vertical) I always mute the other strings with my fingers which is bad for solos, right?

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2009, 04:10:42 am »
My thumb does the same thing sometimes.  First it's in the classical position of being vertical and then if I have to reach across it shifts to being horizontal and my hand and fingers have to curl to reach a few notes.  Although I don't have you're problem where you wind up muting the strings. 

Question:

Why is it for solo's your hand is supposed to be relatively flat against the fretboard but when it comes to chords your hand and fingers have to be somewhat curled? This sounds like a contradiction to me. 

Orion

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #35 on: June 06, 2009, 11:25:35 am »

Question:

Why is it for solo's your hand is supposed to be relatively flat against the fretboard but when it comes to chords your hand and fingers have to be somewhat curled? This sounds like a contradiction to me. 

Simply because in all probability, while you're soloing you'll encounter stuff like bends, legato, muting, etc. For all these you need you hand to remain flat against the fret-board. Check out justin's string bending lesson to see what i'm talking about. Also, in lead work, your fretting hand(more precisely, your index finger) is supposed to mute the higher strings.
With chords, you're looking for more reach and a little extra power to hold down those nasty barres. Also, your fretting fingers will hardly ever hold down more than 1 string each. So, to make sure that your finger lands cleanly on the desired note, you need to curl it a bit. Hope that clears it up...

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #36 on: June 06, 2009, 09:32:57 pm »
That makes sense.  I was just curious.  Now I need to work and making my hand flat for lead work.  I can curl for chords but fingers aren't all that flat.  I guess that's what happens when you play chords first and then work on solo's. 

rendelven

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2009, 05:19:40 pm »

Question:

Why is it for solo's your hand is supposed to be relatively flat against the fretboard but when it comes to chords your hand and fingers have to be somewhat curled? This sounds like a contradiction to me. 

Simply because in all probability, while you're soloing you'll encounter stuff like bends, legato, muting, etc. For all these you need you hand to remain flat against the fret-board. Check out justin's string bending lesson to see what i'm talking about. Also, in lead work, your fretting hand(more precisely, your index finger) is supposed to mute the higher strings.
With chords, you're looking for more reach and a little extra power to hold down those nasty barres. Also, your fretting fingers will hardly ever hold down more than 1 string each. So, to make sure that your finger lands cleanly on the desired note, you need to curl it a bit. Hope that clears it up...

Not to mention that a lot of songs require some kind of muting with the fretting hand. You can't mute if you don't touch the strings. :)

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #38 on: June 13, 2009, 04:28:47 am »
Right.   8)

Offline bika

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2009, 01:23:03 pm »
Muscle memory-
Often after playing a scale over and over you develop muscle memory.
For me it's like I could have spent ages playing a scale over and over and feel as though I'm not moving forward (ie; speed and accuracy) then I will put the guitar down go away for an hour or whatever, come back pick up the guitar for a bit of a fidget and play the scale without paying particular attention ... and my little old fingers just take off and do their thing.
Sometimes maybe we can  over concentrate or something.


Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #40 on: July 14, 2009, 08:20:24 pm »
I do that sometimes. 

jasonfields

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #41 on: July 22, 2009, 12:51:55 am »
Hello,

I have just started working on this exercise and had a question.  Should I be concerned with keeping the other strings muted at this point or should I just worry about my accuracy and allow some unwanted string noise? 

I have noticed that if, for instance, I play a note on the D string I am able to mute the A string with the tip of my left index finger.  I am having trouble muting the low E with my palm.  I am not hitting this string its like it vibrates with the A string.  I have checked by setting up and plucking just the one note and checking that I am not hitting anything else.  This occurs with other strings also.

A little background on my experience is basically I have none.  I got my first guitar when I was 14 and played for a couple of years, but didn't learn the proper way.  I would just play tabs I could learn.  I quit playing until about a month ago, I am now 29, after being laid off from my job and having a lot of free time.  I found this site and started using Justins beginner course about 2 weeks ago.  Awesome site by the way.  I am in stage 3 of the course, I was familiar with some of the chords already.  The anchor finger and 1 minute changes made an immediate impact on my playing though.

My equipment info in case it is needed:
Ibanez ex1500
Fender Jam amp

Should I just wait until I am further along before trying this exercise?

Should I not worry about the small amount of sound or keep concentrating on trying to mute with my palm?
I can keep the higher strings muted alright its the palm mute that is the problem.


Thanks for any info
Jason


rendelven

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #42 on: July 22, 2009, 05:08:01 pm »
Should I just wait until I am further along before trying this exercise?

Should I not worry about the small amount of sound or keep concentrating on trying to mute with my palm?
I can keep the higher strings muted alright its the palm mute that is the problem.


Thanks for any info
Jason

I would recommend that you separate these into two different exercises ( one just scale picking ) and one focusing on muting.

Once you get the basics down for muting you can speed it up and eventually combine both exercises into just 'scale picking'.

jasonfields

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #43 on: July 22, 2009, 09:12:34 pm »
Thanks for the advice.  Thats what I'll do.

Jason

Danilo

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #44 on: July 29, 2009, 11:02:39 pm »
Hi there...just 2 simple questios

I'm right now at 140 BPM with 2 notes per click....this is: slow, kind of slow, moderate, quite fast or fast??

And before I start practicing should I do a warm up exercise? Because let's say that I've just woke up...if I get the guitar and start playing the scale where I were (140 BMP 2 notes/click) I feel like I "forgot" how to play on that speed that I was the day before.

You guys think that a warm up would resolve that or I'm just moving on to fast? (I do play 4 times perfectly before going on)

Thanks!

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #45 on: August 15, 2009, 05:41:34 am »
Before I do any technical excercises I tend to use justin's finger stretch.  It stretches the muscles in a good way and then I practice the technical excercises.  My advice is to always build up to that speed until you can just play at that speed without worrying about it.  I can't really play 8th notes past 180bpm.  I can almost get to the top of my metronome of 216 bpm for 8th notes but I find that I get stressed and that I need to work to get to those tempos.  I'm still working on my 16th notes.  I can't go faster than maybe 76bpm for 16th notes.  I'm barely at 80bpm.  If you have an 8th note setting on your metronome, then turn that on and play your notes to each of those clicks.  That might help too.  See if any of my suggestions help.  If they don't that's okay, everyone learns differently. 

KRIBER

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #46 on: September 15, 2009, 07:53:27 pm »
Hi all,

I want to share some tips which helps me.
I can do 16th notes at 100bpm feeling comfortable and it took me 1 month to go from 90 to 100.
first of all it is good to vary alternate picking exercise (u will find 1000's on the net).
Something with help me so much:
just mute all strings using your left hand and simply do 16th note at your maximum speed performing an alternate picking starting on E (big) down/up/down/up then A d/u/d/u and so on and when you reach E (thin) climb up doing the same method.
You will notice that you can go faster as you don't care about your left hand which is doing nothing but muting all notes.
increase the metronome to your new limit (120bpm for me) and do this for 5 - 10 mn;
Have an attentive look to your picking and try to correct it.
Small movements / using only a minimum part of the pick / relax.
 then start the Justin scales picking exercise at your previous limit.
You should feel more comfortable now as you need less care to your right hand, speed being lower. tricky to explain but I hope you understand.
It helps me a lot and I hope it will help some of you.
Now if someone could also share some experiences and tips I would be gratefull.
Move on guy and all the best

« Last Edit: September 15, 2009, 08:28:13 pm by KRIBER »

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #47 on: September 15, 2009, 08:39:40 pm »
Are you referring to a chromatic exercise?  I found one similar except it starts with quarter notes, then eighth notes and finally 16th notes.  However, for whatever reason when you get to the 16th notes thats when there are hammer on and pull off markings.......which I don't do well with pull off's so I tend to do the insane thing by trying to pick all the notes and then it comes out messy. 


KRIBER

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #48 on: September 16, 2009, 05:36:03 am »
to my opinion, when it becomes messy it is mostly due to the fact that both hand are not well synchronized.
Chromatic exercices are quite good as doing 1234 successively on every strings dudu dudu dudu when move to the next fret and climb up when move and down again up to the 12th fret then reverse 4321 to the top of the neck.this is more easy than scale let's say you can go 5 - 10bpm more faster which help right hand.
I think instead of increasing your scale picking speed both hand at a time it is better to work on the right hand first by doing simple chromatic exercices which are more easy to memorize for left hand.
then when you feel comfortable stick to that speed and concentrate on left hand using scales.

Sl8sh

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Re: TE-003 • Scale Picking
« Reply #49 on: September 17, 2009, 12:13:19 am »
I'll see what it does.  My left hand is the one that tends to move faster than my right hand. 

 

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